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George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sad tale of two stumbling parties

- The Washington Times

We’ve heard the words and music of this song before. The hoariest cliche in American politics, presented as accomplished fact by every wise head in academe and media after every wipe-out election, is that the losing party is finished. Kaput. Destroyed. Done for. Dead, as in the graveyard.

Royhingya refugees from Myanmar receiving food from Bangladeshi aid workers          Associated Press photo

A refugee emergency and the terrorism it breeds

Bangladesh has been a haven for the Rohingya people since they began fleeing unprovoked oppression in their home state of Rakhine on Myanmar’s western shore, bordering Bangladesh, in 2015. Denied citizenship in their own country, the Rohingya have been in conflict not only with the other citizens of Rakhine but also with the government of Myanmar, which considers many of them to be anti-government insurgents. The United Nations describes the Rohingya as one of the world’s most persecuted people.

Trump's Door and Wall Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MAGA and DACA

What does it mean to ‘Make America Great Again’? That’s a seemingly simple question with no simple answer, but an important part of it is certainly fixing our broken systems.

Illustration on possible solutions to the North Korea situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump, the statesman, at the U.N.

President Trump is right. His speech at the United Nations was his third act of Reagan-like statesmanship, after the historically accurate, morally rooted and inspirational speeches in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and Warsaw, Poland. This time, he pointedly spoke for those who cannot speak in Iran, North Korea, Venezuela, and suppressed people around the world. It was a tour de force, and it’s hard to disagree with any word. Once again, Ronald Reagan would be nodding.

Illustration on Russia's attacks on Ukraine by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Taking Putin seriously

President Trump mentioned the word sovereignty 21 times in his address to the United Nations Tuesday, but said little about Russia’s efforts to seize parts of Ukraine, piece by piece, and threaten other neighboring states.

In this June 2, 2017, file photo, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Scott Pruitt, in fight for EPA life — literally

- The Washington Times

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has apparently generated so much controversy that radical green peeps are threatening him with near-regularity, to the point he’s now getting extra armed protection. Seriously, folks, some perspective, please. Are trees that important?

Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year’s presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump’s favor.

Courage and Vision of Columbus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Good-bye, Columbus

With Columbus Day upon us leftist rage is approaching gale force. Blinded by their irrational hatred they denounce Columbus and the civilization he symbolized for every ill ever visited upon this hemisphere. They are domestic Taliban, whose goal is the cultural obliteration of our society.

A protester is silhouetted as he carries the United Nations flag during a rally against Nigerian President Buhari as pedestrians walk through federal plaza Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Jarring minds with facts, not fists

The economics of free speech have become quite strange. It took $600,000, a sea of police officers in riot gear and concrete barricades to ensure Berkeley didn’t devolve into anarchy and chaos when conservative political commentator Ben Shapiro came to town last week. Demonstrations outside remained mostly peaceful with only nine arrests. This, however, is a troubling sign in light of what comes next on Berkeley’s campus.

Illustration on John Dickinson     The Washington Times

Planting the seeds of American independence

This year marks the 250th anniversary of one of the most influential series of writings in American history: the first of John Dickinson’s Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, which appeared in 1767.

Then-first lady Barbara Bush and then-Missouri Gov. John Ashcroft attend a "Parents as Teachers" event in Florissant, Missouri, where Mrs. Bush reads to the children. (National Archives)

Reading is still fundamental, even amid hurricanes

- The Washington Times

Christian and Skyler were anxious. The 5-year-old Texas twins were set to enter kindergarten — until Hurricane Harvey ripped their world. Their school is among five north of Corpus Christi that remain shuttered, having lost heating and air conditioning systems, roofs, electrical systems and much of what ordinarily defines a schoolhouse, including children, teachers and books.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters about the Graham-Cassidy health care bill during a meeting with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump takes leadership reins, pushes top items of agenda

First, President Trump marshalled the full attention and focus of the federal government in response to hurricanes Harvey and Irma, winning broad praise for the federal government’s response. Criticism has not come, despite the size and scope of the storms and the harsh partisan atmosphere.

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Illustration on the hazards of potential global cooling by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Preventing the other climate catastrophe

Climate cooling, as opposed to warming, presents serious problems for humanity. As cooling causes agriculture to fail, most of the world's population will starve and we will be reduced from its present level to about a million, hunting animals and collecting nuts and seeds for sustenance. This has happened before during the ice ages, when nomadic bands of prehistoric humans had to shelter in caves for protection from the cold, and had to rely on uncertain supplies of food.

Illustration on North Korea's martial mentality by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Countering North Korea's nuclear blackmail

North Korea's official statements following its recent underground nuclear test for the first time revealed plans to use its nuclear weapons to create an electromagnetic pulse (EMP).

Illustration on improving the U.N. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Fixing the United Nations

The United Nations was created in the wake of World War II by the major Allied nations that had prevailed -- at an enormous cost in blood and treasure -- over the Axis powers. Its founders proclaimed ambitious goals: to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of war," "reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights" and "promote social progress." That the U.N. hasn't come close to succeeding should, by now, be obvious.

Illustration on negotiating with North Korea by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Putting North Korea over a barrel

The theme of this year's 72nd session of the U.N. General Assembly is a world "striving for peace." This meeting of 193 member states comes at a time when one of its members, North Korea, is threatening nuclear conflict.

Love and arson on the Eastern Shore

What does it take to make a silk purse from a sow's ear? A silkworm and a needle. What does it take to make a mad-crime story into an elegiac page-turner? A writer with a police reporter's calloused grasp of gritty facts, a farmer's dogged patience and a silken touch at the keyboard.

Let Taiwan into Interpol

Interpol is the world's largest international police organization, with the role to enable police around the world to work together to make the world a safer place. The 86th Interpol General Assembly will be held Sept. 26-29, 2017, in Beijing.

Destroyed trailers are seen at the Seabreeze trailer park along the Overseas Highway in the Florida Keys on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017. Florida is cleaning up and embarking on rebuilding from Hurricane Irma, one of the most destructive hurricanes in its history. (Al Diaz/Miami Herald via AP)

Lessons from the storm

The lasting effect of two hurricanes, Harvey and Irma, may be settling the fundamental argument about climate change, although neither side in that bitter and costly dispute recognizes it just yet.

Two American astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Joseph Acaba, together with Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, were launched on a mission to the International Space Station using Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft.

Message to Washington and Moscow from Space

Let's assume that after Special Counsel Robert Mueller and numerous Congressional committees have spent tens of millions of taxpayers' dollars they finally find smoking gun, i.e. indisputable proof of the Kremlin's hack into the Clinton campaign's and the DNC's emails, plus other attempts to influence the outcome of the U.S. presidential election. Then what?

A view of the Florida Keys during the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Christians beat FEMA, and in so doing, tame Big Government

- The Washington Times

Faith-based groups -- Christian nonprofits, specifically -- have been busy bees of late, providing more aid to hurricane victims than even FEMA, the federal agency that's supposed to swoop to the scenes of natural disasters, assess the situation and speed the recovery and rebuilding process. Just goes to show: Where charity exists, government is not needed.

Illustration on corruption in Italy's support of refugees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Mafia and the migrants

I spotted them on my way to dinner with a friend near Castel Gandolfo. They are migrants from Africa, sitting by the side of the road outside a "temporary" residence that, for many, appears to have become permanent. They all have cellphones. They all seem oblivious to us as we pass by.