Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on economic and technological ties between America and Israel by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The U.S.-Israel economic bond

Much of the talk around President Trump’s meeting this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House surrounds the political and security relationship between the two countries. That is important. But it is only part of the story. Despite having a tiny population of eight million people, Israel is playing a crucial role in helping to power the U.S. economy for the next generation.

California Claim Jumpers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why California’s mining ban is against the law

If you ask a rural Westerner how he feels about federal lands, the response will likely contain plenty of four-letter words. For decades, decisions made by faraway bureaucrats to restrict the productive uses of these lands have significantly affected nearby property owners and local economies, creating a constant source of conflict.

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Russia conundrum

Donald Trump’s presidency is in deep trouble. After nearly four weeks in office, he has yet to finish filling his administration’s top posts, and Congress is about to conduct an investigation into his ties to Russia.

CIA Bullies Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The CIA’s affront to Trump

The CIA has denied a security clearance to Trump National Security Council (NSC) official Robin Townley without any allegation, much less evidence of disloyalty to the United States. Quite simply, it is because the CIA disapproves of Mr. Townley’s attitude toward the agency, and this is unprecedented.

President Donald Trump calls out to the media after escorting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to his car to depart the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Intellectual honesty and political indifference

Over the past weekend, Trump administration officials offered harsh criticisms of the judicial interference with the enforcement of the president’s immigration order. The Jan. 27 order suspended the immigration privileges of all refugees from Syria indefinitely and all immigrants from seven designated countries for 90 days.

ISIS Drone Attacks Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ISIS drones could target Europe

Killer drones guided by Islamic State terrorists have made their debut in Northern Iraq, prompting concern about a new terror weapon outside of Iraq.

Illustration on the EMP threat to the U.S. from North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

North Korea, the real threat

When might North Korean develop missiles capable of striking the United States? Today.

Illustration on the Left's protests against Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The angry Loser Party

Proponents of the Women’s March and other protests that have broken out in various city centers and airport terminals across the country often compare themselves to the Tea Party movement.

Shattered Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A new approach to U.S. Middle East strategy

The Trump administration has a unique opportunity to implement a new strategic policy to bring some semblance of stability to the current Middle East chaos. Under the pledge of putting “America first,” our core national security interest in the region should include the following:

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, joined from left by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., takes questions from reporters about President Donald Trump's ousted national security adviser, Michael Flynn, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

An overlooked Republican empire

Donald Trump’s narrow presidential win actually masks Republicans’ growing national dominance. By focusing on the unconventional “who” and “how” of November’s presidential race, we overlook the “what” and “why” lying beneath it. Below the presidential results rests progressively stronger Republican bases at the state and congressional levels.

Related Articles

When a vaunted life and fiction converge

The very term Dame of the British Empire -- the female equivalent of a knighthood in the British gentry -- inevitably summons up a majestic figure. But there was nothing genteel about the British novelist Dame Beryl Bainbridge DBE (1932-2010).

Illustration on exposing subversive elements in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring America's leadership and security

There is no question that on Nov. 8, 2016 we had a political revolution in America. Over 63 million Americans had had enough of President Obama's "fundamental transformation" of America. His embrace of the progressive socialist agenda with its Marxist roots, coupled with his attempt to force the spread of Islam on our Judeo-Christian culture, resulted in not only a failed domestic policy but also a disastrous foreign policy. His actions have left the Middle East in total chaos in addition to creating the greatest strategic instability throughout the world since WWII.

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2016 file photo, then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures as he talks with Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke, left, during a campaign stop at Milwaukee County War Memorial Center in Milwaukee. Clarke has risen to the national political spotlight with a brash, unapologetic personality reminiscent of President Donald Trump. But while some Republicans swoon over his prospects for higher office, the tough-talking, cowboy-hat wearing lawman remains one of the most polarizing figures in Wisconsin politics. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

A mad man, or maybe a magician

Donald Trump as a real estate dealmaker thrived on chaos -- creating and then exploiting it to achieve his goals. Now as president, Mr. Trump is upsetting allies and disrupting international security and economic arrangements to deliver on his campaign promises to make Americans safer and more prosperous.

Illustration on the need for voter ID laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why the North Carolina voter ID case matters

They may never admit it, but the civil rights industry is tired of spending millions of dollars only to lose most voter ID fights in court. Instead of declaring defeat, the strategy has shifted to changing the rules of engagement, and trying to transform the Voting Rights Act into something it isn't. The Supreme Court can now stop this transformation of the Voting Rights Act into a partisan political weapon, if it accepts an appeal from North Carolina.

Executive order necessary

As attested to by the FBI, the U.S. intelligence community is concerned that the Islamic State has the ability to manufacture fraudulent passports ("How Donald Trump strengthens national security," Web, Feb. 1).

A rainbow is shown from Bernal Heights Hill in San Francisco, Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Indigestion at the table

San Francisco has long been on the cutting edge of fine cuisine, the gustatory equal of New York and New Orleans. The city sometimes calls itself "Baghdad by the Bay," a marketing stroke obviously coined by someone who had never been east of Suez, "where the best is like the worst." So when restaurant after restaurant started closing in recent months the foodie fashionistas in San Francisco swallowed hard and asked what happened.

Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., speaks at the Jefferson College of Health Sciences at the Carilion Clinic on Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, in Roanoke, Va. (Stephanie Klein-Davis/The Roanoke Times via AP)

When the party's over

The radical left, which now, alas, includes the Democratic Party, has gone off the rails. Worker bees at the Environmental Protection Agency and certain other federal agencies, encouraged by their superiors, are now using encrypted messages to coordinate undermining the policies of the new Trump administration. Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, the party's recent vice presidential nominee, seems to endorse "fighting" the new president "in the streets." The country has never seen such subversion by a major political party.

Family troubles and war-torn London

Those people were war dead and the memory as portrayed by Elizabeth Wilhide is that of Julia and her existence in the World War II blitz of London. The scenes of what Londoners suffered in 1944 are harrowing not only for their gruesome qualities but for their chilling emphasis on how much trivia came to matter.

Illustration on the application of law to Hillary Clinton by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton and the law

Hillary Clinton's email scandal and the Clinton Foundation scandal are back in the news, as they are likely to be for years to come. At his confirmation hearing, Attorney General-designate Jeff Sessions said he would recuse himself from all investigations involving the Clintons.

Illustration of Linda Sarsour by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Linda Sarsour, the left's latest star

What to make of Linda Sarsour of Brooklyn, lead plaintiff in the lawsuit against President Trump's immigration order and the new, seemingly ubiquitous symbol of the hard left-radical Islam alliance?

Rex Tillerson (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The coming test of Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is about to get a tough test of his presidential leadership, with no true-or-false or multiple-choice questions. Every new president gets the test, usually administered by international creeps and bad guys. There's no fudging the answers. Reality is the teacher, grading on a steep curve, and presidents pass or fail. There's no soft grading.

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2017, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Prime Minister of Australia Malcolm Turnbull in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. For decades, Australia and the U.S. have enjoyed the coziest of relationships, collaborating on everything from military and intelligence to diplomacy and trade. Yet an irritable tweet President Donald Trump fired off about Australia and a dramatic report of an angry phone call between the nations' leaders proves that the new commander in chief has changed the playing field for even America's staunchest allies. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

The Australian mess-up?

- The Washington Times

The mainstream media erupted Wednesday night after a Washington Post report said President Trump had a heated exchange with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Comedian Sarah Silverman speaks during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia , Monday, July 25, 2016. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

What exactly is the resistance?

- The Washington Times

Rather than regrouping and concentrating on reconnecting in areas of the country where President Obama won twice but Hillary Clinton lost, it seems like the left is doubling down on crazy.