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Trig Dommer, 4, of Sioux Falls, checks out the voting booth next to his mom Naomi Dommer as she fills out her ballot during the South Dakota Primary Election, Tuesday, June 7, 2016, at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Sioux Falls, S.D. (Joe Ahlquist/Argus Leader via AP)

A suspicious wind in the rigging

- The Washington Times

There’s no such thing as voter fraud, as the Democrats and right-thinking press mavens have been telling us for weeks, but some curious things are happening out there in flyover country. Some of the assurances that all is well on the old ship of state have been caught in what looks suspiciously like the rigging.

Illustration for the 130th anniversary of the dedication of the Statue of Liberty                The Washington Times

A monumental gift

Today is the 130th anniversary of the dedication of the Statue of Liberty, a national monument that most Americans simply associate as a gift of the French people to honor the working of the two nations together during the American Revolution.

The Hillary Effect on Women Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s problem with women

Two weeks before the election, Hillary Clinton appears on track to win the presidency and become the first female commander in chief. She can credit her surge in the polls this last month to women — primarily her opponent’s offensive comments unearthed from a decade ago and the various accusations that have suddenly surfaced and have dominated the media.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greets supporters following a "Get out the vote," rally at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016 in downtown Tampa, Fla. (Loren Elliot/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Hillary’s anti-transparency bargain

President Obama recently condemned the Republican Party, claiming that its “central principle” is to suppress voting. But, while his administration piously pledges to protect voting rights, it has almost guaranteed that Americans will be blindfolded on Election Day. While the Justice Department will deploy election monitors at polls in 25 states, no one watched Uncle Sam.

Illustration on NATO fiscal responsibility by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A threadbare alliance

Historians and political scientists commonly describe the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as the most effective military alliance in contemporary history. It was the bond between the United States and Western Europe that helped contribute to the decline and eventual collapse of the Soviet Union.

Illustration on the 2016 campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Donald Trump is still the safer choice

America is a two-party system and after party conventions select the nominees, we have two choices and only two choices. Both nominees have demonstrated serious character flaws. The current spotlight is on lewd, vulgar comments from Donald Trump that cannot be defended. Nevertheless, his words could never be used to justify a vote for Hillary Clinton and her leftist agenda.

Donald Trump arrives at a Trump rally at Sanford Orlando International Airport in Sanford, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. Trump is pledging to bolster the government's investment in the space program, a boon to the Space Coast of Florida. (Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

The staying power of populism

Despite evidence from the 2016 presidential campaign, doubts dominate about populism’s ability to win America’s ultimate prize. “It can’t happen here” is as wrong as the political establishment’s misreading of the populist movement itself. Populism’s history here and abroad argues a populist triumph could eventually occur — if not this November, then soon.

Missile Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran’s proxy missile attacks

The recent missile attacks attributed to Yemeni Houthi rebels, with assistance from the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and Hezbollah, demonstrate Iran’s classic use of proxies to promote its political agenda. The Houthi rebels denied any involvement in the missile attacks.

Illustration on non-voters by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In defense of the nonvoter

Between now and Nov. 8, Americans will be inundated with good-intentioned public service announcements urging them to take the time to vote. And to buttress that argument, statistics about the usual low turnout rate — about 60 percent or so — will suggest that this American trend is somehow illustrative of a major defect in the body politic.

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Illustration on Trump's promises to reduce the burden of government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yes, I still support Donald Trump

I have been asked a dozen times by news reporters over the last week: Do you still support Donald Trump? The elites at The New York Times, Washington Post, and CNN would love to be able to add me and dozens more to the list of Republicans who have publicly denounced the Trump-Pence ticket.

FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2016 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to volunteers at a campaign office in Seattle. Hillary Clinton has a tight grip on the Electoral College majority need to be elected president of the U.S., and may very well be on her way to a big victory, and that's how some Republicans see it.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

The last real election

A Hillary Clinton presidency would bring many things, but one consequence is assured: a continued assault on our competitive, two-party political system.

The Clinton campaign's bigotry

How does Hillary Clinton and her gang not love you? Let me count the ways: Standard rednecks. Deplorable. Irredeemable. Not American. Needy Latinos. The mocking of Catholics and Evangelicals, and Southerners. And let's not forget those poor Bernie Sanders-supporting basement dwellers.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Public Library and Other Stories'

While the number of libraries is gradually shrinking, Ali Smith preserves these literary sanctuaries in her short story collection, "Public Library and Other Stories," with shifts between past and present, resembling the mechanics of our own memory.

Michelle Obama (Associated Press)

Trash talk and the White House

- The Washington Times

The darndest people have ants in their pants in the wake of the revelations of Donald Trump's vulgar trash talk. Who knew such behavior still had the power to offend?

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, in Cincinnati, Ohio. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

The tawdry 2016 campaign

If the tawdry, tasteless, and utterly classless 2016 presidential campaign is remembered for anything, it will be its failure to deal with significant political issues that matter most to the American people.

Illustration on the evangelical dilemma in the 2016 election by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A plea to Christian conservatives

- The Washington Times

If the election were to be held today, the evangelical vote would be at least 20 percentage points lower than that of evangelicals for the Republican candidate in each of the last five elections, a recent poll by Barna Group, a Christian pollster, shows.

HSBC market prediction self-serving

I read that HSBC is predicting a major stock market calamity similar to the 1987 crash. Of course, a stock market crash would severely damage hundreds of millions of middle-class workers' retirement portfolios. If it were any other bank except the global criminal enterprise HSBC has become, I'm not sure whether I'd be fearful or dismissive of this analysis.

Politically Correct American Military Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How politicizing the military puts national security at risk

There have been many articles written about "political correctness" and how it has effectively silenced any dissent from our military leaders. In a recent article in Foreign Affairs by Michael E. O'Hanlon and David H. Petraeus, titled "America's Awesome Military," the authors continue to promote political correctness and the Obama administration's propaganda that "the United States has the best military in the world today, and have few, if any weaknesses."

Clinton a career criminal

Recently released emails show that the Justice Department was in contact with the Hillary Clinton campaign, warning it about various aspects of the criminal investigation into Clinton. This means that the fix (as anyone whose been paying attention already knows) was in. The Democratic nominee for president is a criminal who is not in prison because Obama's Justice Department is totally corrupt.

Campaign buttons in support of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rest on a vendor table before a campaign rally at US Bank Arena, Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

The partisans in the tall weeds

There's nothing quite as sad as watching grown men racing for the tall grass in the face of difficulty and danger. The Republican elites panicked by the disclosure that Donald Trump said something gross -- even if not necessarily as gross as some of the things attributed to JFK and LBJ and Bill Clinton -- should remember what Donald Rumsfeld, who was then the secretary of Defense, said during the first Gulf War.

A member of the audience holds up a mask depicting Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as she speaks at a rally at the Colorado State Fairgrounds in Pueblo, Colo., Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, to attend a rally. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hypocrisy and Hillary

If Hillary Clinton and hypocrisy are not exactly synonymous, they share the same web address. The WikiLeaks cache of emails containing excerpts of her paid speeches to private donors and organizations demonstrate that every time she opens her mouth, out comes cant.

Capitol Castle Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Medieval America

Pessimists often compare today's troubled America to a tottering late Rome or an insolvent and descending British Empire. But medieval Europe (roughly 500 to 1450 A.D.) is the more apt comparison.

Illustration on the deplorable content of the 2016 presidential campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The presidential candidates we deserve

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are only an accurate reflection of our culture of vulgarity and hypocrisy. Both of them. They're the candidates we asked for. The country may not deserve them, but we the people do.

Illustration on Hillary's redistributionist intentions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What this campaign is really all about

- The Washington Times

The political firestorms of the past week -- the 2005 tape of Donald Trump uttering crass statements about women, WikiLeaks' disclosure of thousands of Hillary Clinton's emails revealing her two-faced hypocrisy, the appearance at the second presidential debate of several women who have accused Bill Clinton of rape and sexual assault, Mr. Trump's comeback debate performance -- have obscured one critically important truth.

President Barack Obama gestures as he speaks during a reception for Hispanic Heritage Month in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Secrets from the closets of skeletons

Hacking files of other people is not nice, and if the FBI finds out who's doing it the perps should be punished, even if they're Russians, and severely. But we're nevertheless learning some interesting things in the WikiLeaks disclosures. This sudden mania for disclosure of bad language and naughty behavior encourages others to contribute entertaining and embarrassing videos.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Ten Restaurants that Changed America'

In these days of ever-increasing specialization in the academic world, with its micro-courses and all too narrow focus, it is a delightful surprise to encounter someone like Yale's professor Paul Freedman.