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Illustration on the cultural importance of Shakespeare and his play, 'Julius Caesar'              The Washington Times

Donald Trump Julius Caesar mockery reduces Shakespeare

Whether the famous dead Roman is a look-alike for Donald Trump, with a blond comb-over and a long red tie, a cool black dude in a tailored suit suggesting Barack Obama, or a 1930s Orson Welles with a Sam Browne belt resembling Benito Mussolini, the character has captured the imagination of public and players since Shakespeare wrote it more than four centuries ago.

Illustration on the fiscal plight of Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sinking feeling in Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is drowning. The island, so popular with tourists, is $123 billion in debt. That’s more debt than the $18 billion bankruptcy filed by the city of Detroit in 2013. In May, San Juan declared a form of bankruptcy after creditors filed lawsuits demanding their money. A federal district judge appointed by Chief Justice John Roberts will handle the case.

Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism

“The Germans are either at your feet or at your throat,” wrote the Roman historian Tacitus 2,000 years ago. Sadly, that axiom is not just ancient history. In the last century, Germany started two world wars, caused the death and suffering of tens of millions, and was responsible for the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust.

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Trump and his generals

Donald Trump earned respect from the Washington establishment for appointing three of the nation’s most accomplished generals to direct his national security policy: James Mattis (secretary of defense), H.R. McMaster (national security adviser) and John Kelly (secretary of homeland security).

Sponsor of Terror Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Qatar threatens peace

Qatar, a small oil- and gas-rich nation in the Arabian Peninsula, has been boycotted by its neighbors, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt. Other nations, including Libya, Maldives, Mauritania, Jordan, Djibouti and Senegal, also have commenced severe diplomatic measures against Qatar.

Illustration of American consul Raymond Geist              The Washington Times

A disingenuous handling of the Jewish refugee issue in ‘Genius’

Albert Einstein was one of the greatest scientists of all time. His contributions to physics revolutionized our understanding of the universe. The current television series based on his life is appropriately titled “Genius.” But did he also help facilitate a mass rescue of Jews from Germany?

In this file photo taken Aug. 31, 2015, a cow grazes at Hickory Hill Milk in Edgefield, S.C. (Susan Ardis/The State via AP)

The fallacy of ‘unhealthy competition’

Just when you thought liberals were focusing only on destroying our government, there is now ample evidence that fellow travelers have been working diligently to destroy the ideas and dreams of our young people.

Illustration on Chinese encroachment on South America by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

China’s encroachment into Latin America

China’s June 14 poaching of Panama, helping it to switch diplomatic relations from Taiwan to China, belies a growing campaign by Beijing to seek greater economic and strategic influence in Latin America at the expense of the United States.

Illustration on the virtues of Kurdish independence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The case for Kurdish independence

On Sept. 25, Kurdistan will hold a referendum for independence. For a number of reasons, the United States should welcome this development and support the referendum.

Illustration on the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The tragic Bolshevik legacy, 100 years on

This year marks 100 years since the Bolshevik Revolution took place in Russia. That year, the centuries-old czardom of Russia and the brief liberal democracy that replaced it collapsed and was soon replaced by the Soviet Union, the world’s first stable communist state.

FILE - This June 7, 2017, file photo, Jodie Ferguson leaves flowers at a small memorial for the victims of a fatal shooting in Sandy, Utah. Sandy Police Chief Kevin Thacker spoke at a news conference Tuesday, June 20, 2017, after questions were raised about whether police missed chances to help victim Memorez Rackley when she reported her ex-boyfriend was threatening her and her children. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

Making sense of senseless shooting

There are events that force a “time out.” One just occurred. Pausing to think about it, is worth the time.

Illustration on the history of the Department of Justice by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A tortuous start for Justice

If you think the Department of Justice is grabbing the headlines these days, on June 22, 1870, the news was even bigger. Congress seemingly remedied the federal government’s legal shortcomings that day when it created the department.

In this image from Senate Television video, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., pauses as he speaks Wednesday, June 14, 2017, on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Washington, about the shooting at the Republican congressional baseball practice. In remarks made on June 22, Mr. Sanders told an audience that the U.S. is headed in an authoritarian direction under President Trump. (Senate Television via AP) **FILE**

Bern victims pile up in Democratic Party

- The Washington Times

If the anti-Trump fever the media keeps telling us all about cannot break through in Georgia’s 6th District, then it truly is nothing but a phantom that exists nowhere but in the minds of media elites hysterically trying to will President Trump out of existence.

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Ice Cube attends a ceremony honoring him with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Monday, June 12, 2017, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

An angry cloud of snowflakes

Into each life a little rain must fall, as ancient wisdom teaches, and sometimes, when the season is right, the rain turns to snow. Many of these precious snowflakes fall on campus, but not all, and sometimes the snowflakes (mostly fragile millennials who imagine themselves, like snowflakes, unique) fall on unlikely places. Southern California is the last place to expect a heavy snowfall, but it happens. We can blame President Trump, apparently not global warming.

FILE - In this Friday, June 9, 2017 file photo, Iranians attend the funeral of victims of an Islamic State militant attack, in Tehran, Iran. Its strongholds in Iraq and Syria slipping from its grasp, the Islamic State group threatened to make this years Ramadan a bloody one at home and abroad. With attacks in Egypt, Britain and Iran among others and a land-grab in the Philippines, the group is trying to divert attention from its losses and win over supporters around the world in the twisted competition for jihadi recruits. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi, File)

Terror turnaround in Tehran

Terrorism is a scourge born in an evil place in the heart, extinguishing hope and breeding cynicism like little else. Now that the Islamic Republic of Iran has felt the lash of wholesale murder, perhaps the hard-hearted mullahs will reconsider their "holy" war against the world. Pigs, not necessarily the favorite animals of the followers of Muhammad, will sooner fly.

Oakland Raiders quarterback Derek Carr throws during the team's organized team activity at its NFL football training facility Tuesday, May 30, 2017, in Alameda, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

SNYDER: Fireworks ahead for the Cousins soap opera

The Kirk Cousins melodrama is coming to a head: Either he signs a long-term deal or he plays a second consecutive season under the franchise tag, virtually guaranteeing himself a roster spot with San Francisco, Los Angeles or elsewhere in 2018.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is one of many high profile Democrats attending a progressive ideas summit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, latest leftie to f-bomb over Trump

- The Washington Times

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Democrat, went on a bit of an f-bomb tangent during her recent address before the Personal Democracy Forum, telling the audience those who aren't "helping people" should go the eff home, saying President Donald Trump has not kept his promises -- eff no he hasn't.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., questions former FBI Director James Comey during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 8, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

John McCain, off rail, says Obama better than Trump

- The Washington Times

We know Sen. John McCain is no friend of President Donald Trump's -- but this is ridiculous. The Arizona senator, who says he's a Republican, actually came out and told a left-leaning overseas newspaper, the Guardian, that Barack Obama provided better leadership for America than Trump.

Hearing Aid Solutions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'Now hear this!'

I'm technically disabled -- but not mentally disabled the way some of my foes on CNN seem to believe. No, my disability is hearing loss (in one ear I'm nearly deaf).

Illustration on the West's reaction to Islamist terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Have we finally had 'enough'?

Islamic terrorists killed eight people and wounded 48 more in London on June 3 before being shot to death by police. It was the third terrorist attack in Britain in as many months.

Illustration on Trump and a divided America by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

This deeply divided nation

President Trump inherited a deeply divided and troubled nation. We have always had regions that lead and others that lag, and sectionalism. However, not since Reconstruction and the Great Depression have economic and cultural divisions been so stark.

Illustration on Bernie Sanders' as a priest of the god of government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Bowing to Bernie's secular gods

An extraordinary exchange took place this past week amid the hysteria surrounding former FBI Director James Comey's impending testimony the next day before Congress.

From left, Anheuser-Busch InBev Chief Executive Officer Carlos Brito, Brewers Association Chief Executive Officer Bob Pease, National Beer Wholesalers Association President and Chief Executive Officer Craig Purser, Iowa Brewers Guild Minister of Iowa Beer J. Wilson, American Antitrust Institute President Diana Moss, and Molson Coors President and Chief Executive Officer Mark Hunter, are sworn in to testify before the Senate Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights Subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015, during a hearing on world's two biggest beer makers, AB InBev and SABMiller, deal to join forces to create a company that produces almost a third of the world's beer. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Leveling the antitrust playing field

American businesses are suffering as foreign governments misuse their antitrust laws to discriminate against U.S.-based companies. A recent report from Chamber of Commerce's International Competition Policy Expert Group examined this problem, and Congress is now holding hearings on the topic.

Any fight left in U.S.?

Seventy-three years ago, 19- and 20-year-old "men" saved the world from Nazi oppression and unfathomable evil. At 26, my father was older than most of his fellow soldiers, and among the first wave to hit the Normandy beaches. One out of every 10 was killed that day. Every soldier had a buddy who died. Only by the grace of God did Dad come home; otherwise I would not be here writing this letter.

No apologies for self-defense

Before one asks what Israel might have done differently in 1967, it is important to remember why the Six Day War occurred and what efforts Israel has made to achieve peace. To be clear, the war was forced on Israel by Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser. In May 1967, Nasser, emboldened by Yasser Arafat's terror attacks against Israel from 1965 to 1967, demanded that U.N. peacekeepers withdraw from Egypt's Israeli border. The United Nations shamefully complied. Nasser then massed 900 tanks and 130,000 troops along its Israeli border, while another 100,000 troops from a dozen more Arab countries massed along Israel's borders with Jordan and Syria, completing the siege. Egypt also blockaded Israel's port of Eilat — an act of war under international law. On May 26, Nasser boasted: "The battle will be a general one and our basic objective will be to destroy Israel."

FILE- In this Friday, May 26 2017 file photo, a man stands next to flowers for the victims of Monday's bombing at St Ann's Square in central Manchester, England, Friday, May 26 2017. British police say everyone arrested over the Manchester concert bombing has been released without charge, but detectives are still not sure whether the attacker had accomplices. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti, File)

The Tory disaster in Britain

Theresa May is hanging on as the prime minister in Great Britain, but her grip is slipping and the Tories are trying to get a blood transfusion from a tiny fourth (or maybe fifth) party from Northern Ireland, just to survive.

Former FBI Director James Comey recounts a series of conversations with President Donald Trump as he testifies before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 8, 2017. Comey alleges Trump repeatedly pressed him for his "loyalty" and directly pushed him to "lift the cloud" of investigation by declaring publicly the president was not the target of the probe into his campaign's Russia ties. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Winners, losers and factoids

Sorting out the winners and losers in the James Comey soap opera is almost as much fun, for media groupies, as the hearing itself. Whether the sacked FBI director repaired his reputation, or Donald Trump was severely damaged by having mean things said about him, depends, as always, on partisan point of view.

On July 3, 2017, the American University in Moscow and the Burganov Museum will unveil a sculpture of Reagan and Gorbachev in downtown Moscow. For additional information please visit www.RussiaHouse.org/wrf.php

America Needs to Recall Reagan's Approach to Russia

Witnessing the unprecedent anti-Russia hysteria in Washington one feels a real danger that it may end badly for everyone as the poisonous rhetoric from politicos and the media gets more out of hand.