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Barack Obama      Associated Press photo

Rough justice for President Obama and the Saudis

- The Washington Times

Throwing a stone at Saudi Arabia, where stoning women is the national sport, is great fun, and nobody deserves an occasional stoning like the Saudis, just to let the king and his legion of princes know how it feels.

Illustration on the undermining of the Hyde Amendment by Linas GArsys/The Washington Times

The life-saving amendment

Today marks 40 years since the life-saving Hyde Amendment was first enacted. This annual appropriations amendment stops taxpayer dollars from being used to fund most abortions and abortion coverage through government programs like Medicaid.

A Complete Takeover Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ISIS in the Middle East and now here

A comprehensive strategy to defeat Islamic supremacists must include not only a war plan to defeat the enemy on the active battlefields of the Middle East, but it must also address how to defeat this enemy now inside the United States.

Illustration contrasting the media vetting of candidates Obama and Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A biased media in action

- The Washington Times

If Donald Trump becomes the next president of the United States he’ll be more thoroughly vetted by the media than Barack Obama.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 file photo, smoke rises over Saif Al Dawla district, in Aleppo, Syria. Residents in the rebel-held districts of Aleppo have a reprieve from the incessant bombings by Syrian government warplanes and the promise of an end to the crippling siege that has left produce stalls bare. (AP Photo/ Manu Brabo, File)

Vladimir Putin’s bombings

Donald Trump, who has been Vladimir Putin’s chief U.S. apologist, remains strangely mute about the rising death toll caused by Russian airstrikes on Syrian hospitals and other civilians in Aleppo.

Madison Gesiotto, Miss Ohio 2014, also writes the 'Millennial Mindset' column for The Washington Times.

Why I’m a Miss USA competitor supporting and inspired by Donald Trump

The stage lights burned brightly. An audience of thousands stretched out into the dark recesses of the arena. I was standing on the Miss USA stage, a dream come true for so many young women and an incredible memory that I will treasure for years to come. But, an even greater experience that stemmed from my time at Miss USA was my time with Donald Trump.

Illustration on Israel's nuclear strategy in light of use of nuclear weapons by other actors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

On the eve of new atoms

The first post-World War II employment of nuclear weapons will probably be launched by North Korea or Pakistan. Should circumstances actually turn out this way, the resultant harms would impact not only the aggressor state and its victims, but also selected strategic nuclear policies in certain other states. The most significant example of such an impact would likely be Israel.

A Bangladeshi rickshaw transports a passenger in Old Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Rickshaws are the most popular means of public transport in Dhaka. (AP Photo/A.M.Ahad)

Restoring free trade with Bangladesh

Since achieving independence in 1971, Bangladesh has been a strong friend and ally of the United States. Once defined by humanitarian help and development support, the relationship between the United States and Bangladesh is now firmly based on bilateral trade and investment. Today, Bangladeshi products find their way into virtually every American household.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, in Melbourne, Fla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Voting for growth

Voters must shake up Washington if they want a more prosperous future.

FILE - In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 file photo, a soldier from the 1st Battalion of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces listens to an address by his commander after a training exercise to prepare for the operation to re-take Mosul from Islamic State militants, in Baghdad, Iraq. The disparate groups that make up Iraq's security forces are converging on the city of Mosul, lining up for a battle on the historic plains of northern Iraq that is likely to be decisive in the war against the Islamic State group(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

What to do when a ‘narrative war’ fails

Apologies to White House spokesman Josh Earnest, who this week claimed we are in a “narrative war” with the Islamic State, or ISIS, but here’s the only narrative that the current crop of jihadists will understand: “When I am president of the United States, I will be eager and able to unleash on you history’s biggest, baddest collection of warriors, and should you choose to oppose them on the battlefield, they will kill you and break your stuff. Guaranteed.”

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's bellicose attitude by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the Donald is the dove

It’s interesting when a longtime Democrat and long-ago speechwriter for John and Robert Kennedy declares he will vote for Donald Trump. That’s what Adam Walinsky did in Politico Magazine the other day. It’s even more interesting when hostile Democrats rush to defend Hillary Clinton from Mr. Walinsky’s attack, as Peter Beinart did in an article in The Atlantic calling Mr. Walinsky’s piece an “absurd and dishonest essay.”

Egg Shell Helmet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Inmates’ defective work

A scathing report of a joint investigation by the Justice Department’s Inspector General and the Defense Criminal Investigative Service found that the Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Prison Industries (FPI) produced more than 100,000 combat helmets that were defective and would “likely cause serious injury or death to the wearer.”

Fresh Start Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The human face of overcriminalization

A young man from a low-income family sells small amounts of marijuana when real opportunity eludes him. He’s arrested and incarcerated several times. After being convicted and serving his sentence, he leaves prison with a record that will follow him for the rest of his life.

Related Articles

Johnson right choice for president

The Libertarian ticket of Gary Johnson and William Weld brings a huge amount of executive experience, acquired when the candidates were governors. I believe governors are the most qualified politicians to ascend to the presidency.

FILE - In this March 18, 2014 file photo, voters cast their ballots in the Illinois primary in Hinsdale, Ill. A lawsuit is challenging Election Day voter registration in Illinois while prompting concerns from civil rights groups about voter access in the November election. The lawsuit, filed in federal court last month by the legal arm of the Illinois Policy Institute, argues that voters in all 102 counties don't have equal access to same-day registration so it should be abolished at the precinct level. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

Countering the lies of the left

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld Ohio's election reform law, but liberal courts have struck down voter photo ID laws in other states such as North Carolina and North Dakota and watered down photo ID laws in Texas and Wisconsin.

BOOK REVIEW: 'A Gentleman in Moscow'

The crime of Count Alexander Rostov is that he is an unrepentant aristocrat in the bloody aftermath of the Russian revolution. His punishment as imposed by a Bolshevik tribunal in 1922 is lifetime house arrest in the Hotel Metropol in Moscow.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Science determines sex

The Michigan education board is set to approve guidelines declaring that students themselves are best qualified to determine their own gender identity, and that outside confirmation from medical and mental health professionals is not required ("Michigan board approves LGBT guidance to schools," Web, Sept. 14).

China Taunt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How China challenges the West

The red-carpet treatment was given to every world leader attending the Beijing G-20 economic summit meeting Sept. 4-5, 2016, which was hosted by Chinese President Xi Jinping. Everyone, that is, except for the president of the United States of America. There were no stairs for President Obama to emerge from the usual front door of Air Force One. The White House entourage, including the press photographer, were deliberately harassed.

Barack Obama was born to a Kenyan father, also named Barack Obama, and a white mother from Kansas, Stanley Ann Dunham. ** FILE **

The story that won't die

The false story of Barack Obama's birth is the story that just won't die. It's apparently too valuable to too many people to put it in the graveyard of myths, fables and convenient tall tales.

Hillary's Economic Flatline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary chooses Obama's road to fiscal ruin

Hillary Clinton stands at a fork in the federal fiscal policy road. In one direction runs Bill Clinton's performance; in the other, Barack Obama's. Despite claiming both legacies, all indications are that Hillary is choosing President Obama's direction.

Illustration on Obama's economic legacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

No thank you, Obama

While touting the new Census report on income and poverty in America, Barack Obama took credit for $2 a gallon gasoline, and immodestly shouted to his crowd of supporters: "Thank you, Obama."

FILE - In this March 23, 2015, file photo, former NFL football player Darren Sharper appears in Los Angeles Superior Court. The inclusion of former NFL safety and convicted rapist Sharper on this year's list of Hall of Fame nominees has created a national outcry. Sharper, a five-time Pro Bowler, pleaded guilty in 2015 to drugging and raping up to 16 women in four states. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, Pool, File)

Darren Sharper, rape and football Hall of Fame

- The Washington Times

Darren Sharper preyed on offensive opponents on the football field. Darren Sharper preyed on women off the field. The latter is the former, and the former is the latter. Neither deserves to be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Boycott boycotters

In light of the recent dishonorable attacks on our national anthem by the pampered divas of professional sports, I would like to ask one question: Where is the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars?

Police need tools to do job

In my opinion, letting the police have the equipment they need to keep the population safe should be a good thing ("Donald Trump's vow to return military equipment to police jeopardizes outreach to blacks," Web, Sept. 12). If a person is not breaking the law, why would he or she need to fear the police having this equipment?

After a whirlwind trip to Mexico City Wednesday to meet Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, Repbulican presidential candidate Donald Trump said his plans to build a border wall remain. However, Mr. Pena Nieto has vowed not to pay for its construction. (Associated press)

Something there is that likes a wall

Something was lost in the coverage when President Enrique Pena Nieto entertained Donald Trump in Mexico last month. Most of the reporters expected the two men to greet each other with baseball bats and brass knuckles and instead they established a mutual civility that is, alas, missing between Hillary and the Donald. Not paying attention to what the two presidents were saying to each other, most of the reporters missed the most important thing to come out of the meeting. "Making Mexico's borders with our friends and neighbors in Central America more secure," said President Nieto, "is of vital importance for Mexico and the United States."

More disregard for Americans

Hillary Clinton decided to expose other persons to her pneumonia, a potentially contagious disease. She demonstrated an inability to see the immorality of that decision, which could have life-threatening consequences for the young and elderly. Her statement, "I just didn't think it was going to be that big a deal," illustrates once again her contempt for the welfare of the American people. Deplorable.

Donald Trump advocates "extreme vetting" of immigrants from predominantly Muslim nations to weed out potential terrorists, coupled with aggressive coalition military operations in the Middle East. (Associated Press)

Welcome details of Trump economics

Donald Trump put some meat on the bones of his economic plan in New York on Thursday, and his plan to restore growth should mute some of his more ardent conservative critics. These critics have been playing "can you top this" with each other, vying to say the meanest things about him, and here's something positive for them to consider.

Investment Musical Chairs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Here come the tax increases

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has pledged to enact some of the largest tax increases in modern history if elected in November. According to Mrs. Clinton's own campaign estimates, she would increase the income tax by $350 billion, implement business tax reform to the tune of $275 billion, and create a "fair share" tax surcharge on the carried interest of capital gains, which would raise taxes by between $400 billion and $500 billion.