Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on Israel's nuclear strategy in light of use of nuclear weapons by other actors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

On the eve of new atoms

The first post-World War II employment of nuclear weapons will probably be launched by North Korea or Pakistan. Should circumstances actually turn out this way, the resultant harms would impact not only the aggressor state and its victims, but also selected strategic nuclear policies in certain other states. The most significant example of such an impact would likely be Israel.

A Bangladeshi rickshaw transports a passenger in Old Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Rickshaws are the most popular means of public transport in Dhaka. (AP Photo/A.M.Ahad)

Restoring free trade with Bangladesh

Since achieving independence in 1971, Bangladesh has been a strong friend and ally of the United States. Once defined by humanitarian help and development support, the relationship between the United States and Bangladesh is now firmly based on bilateral trade and investment. Today, Bangladeshi products find their way into virtually every American household.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, in Melbourne, Fla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Voting for growth

Voters must shake up Washington if they want a more prosperous future.

FILE - In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 file photo, a soldier from the 1st Battalion of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces listens to an address by his commander after a training exercise to prepare for the operation to re-take Mosul from Islamic State militants, in Baghdad, Iraq. The disparate groups that make up Iraq's security forces are converging on the city of Mosul, lining up for a battle on the historic plains of northern Iraq that is likely to be decisive in the war against the Islamic State group(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

What to do when a ‘narrative war’ fails

Apologies to White House spokesman Josh Earnest, who this week claimed we are in a “narrative war” with the Islamic State, or ISIS, but here’s the only narrative that the current crop of jihadists will understand: “When I am president of the United States, I will be eager and able to unleash on you history’s biggest, baddest collection of warriors, and should you choose to oppose them on the battlefield, they will kill you and break your stuff. Guaranteed.”

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's bellicose attitude by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the Donald is the dove

It’s interesting when a longtime Democrat and long-ago speechwriter for John and Robert Kennedy declares he will vote for Donald Trump. That’s what Adam Walinsky did in Politico Magazine the other day. It’s even more interesting when hostile Democrats rush to defend Hillary Clinton from Mr. Walinsky’s attack, as Peter Beinart did in an article in The Atlantic calling Mr. Walinsky’s piece an “absurd and dishonest essay.”

Egg Shell Helmet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Inmates’ defective work

A scathing report of a joint investigation by the Justice Department’s Inspector General and the Defense Criminal Investigative Service found that the Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Prison Industries (FPI) produced more than 100,000 combat helmets that were defective and would “likely cause serious injury or death to the wearer.”

Fresh Start Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The human face of overcriminalization

A young man from a low-income family sells small amounts of marijuana when real opportunity eludes him. He’s arrested and incarcerated several times. After being convicted and serving his sentence, he leaves prison with a record that will follow him for the rest of his life.

Illustration on the Colombia peace accord and cocaine exportation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Purchasing peace with cocaine?

Ninety-five percent of the cocaine sold on the streets of the United States today comes from Columbia. What’s more, the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, the State Department and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime all agree that the cultivation of coca, the plant used for making cocaine, is surging again in Colombia

John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It’s the conceit of every age that it’s uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it’s the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Illustration on the potential political rift presented by the upcoming election by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When an election produces a political realignment

What do the election years 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, 1932 and 1980 have in political common? They are usually described as “critical” or “realigning” elections by historians who argue they produced a significant realignment in our political system.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference held in the Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another useless Iraq surge

Pessimists and cynics are annoying, mostly because events prove them to be right far more often than they are proven wrong. Sometimes pessimism is the necessary result of an examination of history.

Illustration on new moves toward animal liberation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Food for thought about animal liberation

Peter Singer, Princeton professor and author of the book “Animal Liberation,” will be taking his radical views center stage at the upcoming “The Future of Food” event in Washington, D.C. Hosted by the extremist Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the choice of Mr. Singer to keynote the event offers a peek at just how out of touch animal liberation activists are: While Mr. Singer is against eating animals, he’s OK with the idea of having sex with them.

Related Articles

Boycott boycotters

In light of the recent dishonorable attacks on our national anthem by the pampered divas of professional sports, I would like to ask one question: Where is the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars?

Police need tools to do job

In my opinion, letting the police have the equipment they need to keep the population safe should be a good thing ("Donald Trump's vow to return military equipment to police jeopardizes outreach to blacks," Web, Sept. 12). If a person is not breaking the law, why would he or she need to fear the police having this equipment?

After a whirlwind trip to Mexico City Wednesday to meet Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, Repbulican presidential candidate Donald Trump said his plans to build a border wall remain. However, Mr. Pena Nieto has vowed not to pay for its construction. (Associated press)

Something there is that likes a wall

Something was lost in the coverage when President Enrique Pena Nieto entertained Donald Trump in Mexico last month. Most of the reporters expected the two men to greet each other with baseball bats and brass knuckles and instead they established a mutual civility that is, alas, missing between Hillary and the Donald. Not paying attention to what the two presidents were saying to each other, most of the reporters missed the most important thing to come out of the meeting. "Making Mexico's borders with our friends and neighbors in Central America more secure," said President Nieto, "is of vital importance for Mexico and the United States."

More disregard for Americans

Hillary Clinton decided to expose other persons to her pneumonia, a potentially contagious disease. She demonstrated an inability to see the immorality of that decision, which could have life-threatening consequences for the young and elderly. Her statement, "I just didn't think it was going to be that big a deal," illustrates once again her contempt for the welfare of the American people. Deplorable.

Donald Trump advocates "extreme vetting" of immigrants from predominantly Muslim nations to weed out potential terrorists, coupled with aggressive coalition military operations in the Middle East. (Associated Press)

Welcome details of Trump economics

Donald Trump put some meat on the bones of his economic plan in New York on Thursday, and his plan to restore growth should mute some of his more ardent conservative critics. These critics have been playing "can you top this" with each other, vying to say the meanest things about him, and here's something positive for them to consider.

Investment Musical Chairs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Here come the tax increases

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has pledged to enact some of the largest tax increases in modern history if elected in November. According to Mrs. Clinton's own campaign estimates, she would increase the income tax by $350 billion, implement business tax reform to the tune of $275 billion, and create a "fair share" tax surcharge on the carried interest of capital gains, which would raise taxes by between $400 billion and $500 billion.

George Washington

Hillary Clinton demonstrates the peril in running a mouth

- The Washington Times

The moving finger -- the one that having writ moved on and can't recall a single line (per Omar Khayyam's famous poem) -- is the enemy of all of us, and never more than to somebody called on to write or say something in public. We've even confiscated a word for it, "gaffe." A gaffe is not usually a mistake but what happens when someone blurts out an inconvenient truth.

President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks at the Our Ocean, One Future conference at the State Department in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016. The conference focuses on marine protected areas, sustainable fisheries, marine pollution, and climate-related impacts on the ocean. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The weak Obama econom

The declining, perpetually weak Obama economy is nearing the end of its eighth year, a testament to his failed policies that continue to plague the American people.

Killer thriller debut in 'Nothing Short of Dying'

"Nothing Short of Dying" is probably the best debut thriller of the year -- and don't be surprised if before long Erik Storey ranks among the giants of the thriller genre.

Illustration on Hillary's advocacy of government interference with parents and children by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Children of the state

- The Washington Times

This is how deplorable Hillary Clinton thinks you are: She feels the state can better raise your children than you can.

Illustration on defending the Constitution by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

On its anniversary, the Constitution faces trouble

Americans love the underdog, because we were once underdogs ourselves. A hodgepodge group of British colonies perched on the coast of a wild, unexplored land had the guts to challenge the world's superpower -- and we won. It's a story no one would believe if it weren't written down in our history books.

In this March 1, 2016 file photo, FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

The truth about Hillary and the FBI

The notion that FBI Director James Comey took a fall to protect Hillary Clinton for political reasons is now gaining as much traction as the claim that President Obama was not born in the United States.

Illustration on science's loss of credibility by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When science sells out

The rise in the dominance of financial and commercial interests sponsoring science on one hand, and an increasingly ideological agenda of government-funded research on the other hand, are thwarting and clouding science's role to promote insight, innovation and progress.

Illustration on the continuing importance of the Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The resonance of Constitution Day

On Saturday, many people will glance at their calendars and remark that it is Constitution Day -- a celebration of the day that the Founding Fathers signed our Constitution in 1787. But will it resonate just how much significance that document has -- even more than 200 years after it was signed?

A man walks past the Salt Lake Temple,  a temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, at Temple Square, Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2016, in Salt Lake City. The Pew Research Center survey found that just under half of Mormon registered voters, 48 percent, describe themselves as Republican this year. That's down from 61 percent four years ago when Mitt Romney was the party's presidential nominee. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Buying into the great beyond

Religion in America is no longer the faith of our fathers. Belief is always an uphill climb and our forebears weren't the sort who sought out the gentle slopes. Moderns explain their change of heart as simply the natural progression from superstition to enlightenment.

School choice means prosperity

In these final days of the 114th Congress (until Sept. 30, 2016, when Congress returns home to campaign for reelection), the most critical task that stands before us is to set our nation back onto the constitutional track by restoring "the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our posterity."

Delusional Democrats

When we elected Barack Obama as our president, we selected not only a chief of the executive branch of government but a chief political philosopher as well. As philosopher-in-chief, Mr. Obama can divine the future, see the arc of history to which all the rest of us mortals are blind, and know just where America's most insidious enemies can be found -- in the Republican Party.