Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on threatened government meddling in the private sector world of sports by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Jumping offsides on ‘Deflategate’

Super Bowl XLIX (49) will be played this Sunday. Sadly, the anticipated matchup between the AFC champion New England Patriots and NFC champion Seattle Seahawks has already had the wind knocked out of its sails — or, in this case, the air out of its footballs.

The Democratic assault on free speech

- The Washington Times

Everybody’s for free speech — until somebody says something he doesn’t like. But the genius of the First Amendment is that it is so direct and plain that even a lawyer or a judge can understand it.

Illustration on the Obama administrations role in Iranian nuclear ambitions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s price for Obama’s coveted legacy

The importance of any political event is best measured against its opponents’ reactions. By that yardstick, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s agreement to speak about the dangers of Iran’s pursuit of nuclear weapons before a joint session of Congress is already enormously significant.

Illustration on American's diminished economic freedom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Regaining lost economic freedom

If you were to rank all the countries of the world based on their level of economic freedom, you’d think the United States would be a shoo-in for first place, right? Surely we would be at least somewhere in the top five.

Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yemen’s collapse demonstrates Obama’s foreign policy failures

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

Illustration on corrupt reprisals from the IRS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Payback from the IRS

The Internal Revenue Service’s woes did not begin or end with Lois Lerner and the agency’s targeting of political opponents with punitive action. Earlier this month we became painfully aware (again) that political games and punishing the taxpayer appear to be the burgeoning raison d’etre of the tax-collecting agency.

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week’s State of the Union address is that the economic “crisis is over.” Apparently, we’ve been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama’s celebration was the old “Icky Shuffle” end zone dance.

A woman waves a Greek flag during a speech by the leader of Syriza left-wing party Alexis Tsipras outside Athens University Headquarters, Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015. A triumphant Alexis Tsipras told Greeks that his radical left Syriza party's win in Sunday's early general election meant an end to austerity and humiliation and that the country's regular and often fraught debt inspections were a thing of the past. "Today the Greek people have made history. Hope has made history," Tsipras said in his victory speech at a conference hall in central Athens. (AP Photo/Fotis Plegas G.)

Now Greeks should dump the Euro

Since 2008, the Greek economy has shrunk by 25 percent, and the stock market is down more than 80 percent.

Illustration on school choice by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The steady progress of school choice

Sunday marked the start of National School Choice Week, an annual celebration of education reforms that give parents the power to pick the schools, public or private, that are best for their children.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering “free” health care, “free” phones and “free” food to the masses, he’s upped the bribery to “free” community college tuition and “free” child care. It’s not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

Related Articles

Securing the border first is a sound idea: This fence marks the U.S.-Mexico border at El Calaboz, Texas. (Associated press)

Stopping jihad in America

The terrorist attacks on France are a reminder that the broken U.S. immigration system isn't just about saving American jobs, but keeping out terrorists who are itching to make similar attacks in America. In the wake of the Paris attacks that killed 17 men and women last week, security officials have warned that the United States is a target for mayhem, too. President Obama's relentless determination to open the nation's borders to just about everyone makes it considerably easier for the Islamic jihadis to prepare a strike. We shouldn't need a violent episode here to remind everyone that a nation that won't control its border is no nation at all.

 (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Flunking Econ 101

Julia lives. Everybody is trying to forget Julia, President Obama's campaign cartoon figure from his 2012 re-election campaign. "The Life of Julia" touted the advantages of cradle-to-grave federal munificence, from universal pre-kindergarten classes for toddlers to Obamacare for everybody. "Julia" might have been called a celebration of womb-to-tomb munificence, except that a shower of contraceptives and abortions under Obamacare would mean that prospective descendants of Julia would never make it out of the womb.

General William Donovan works in the OSS headquarters offices during World War II. (OSS Society)

Saved from the wrecking ball? New plans emerge for OSS HQ, historic home to the nation's top spies

- The Washington Times

Three cheers, and perhaps a 21-gun salute for a rare cultural victory in the age of hasty conclusions and insta-buildings. The General Services Administration is now mulling over practical ways to preserve one of the most unique clutch of buildings in the nation's capital, all previously faced with a most undignified tear down. The august former headquarters of the Office of Strategic Services - that's the precursor of the CIA - were at risk of facing the bulldozer, potentially to fall in favor of new office space for the Department of State, which stands close by, as does the Lincoln Memorial, Kennedy Center and multiple historic sites.

President Barack Obama speaks at Pellissippi State Community College, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015, in Knoxville, Tenn., about new initiatives to help more Americans go to college and get the skills they need to succeed. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Obama's bogus community college giveaway

President Obama can't resist the temptation to gin up new entitlements that chase votes but make problems worse—free tuition at community colleges would be no exception.

The wanting last of Bellow

For any writer, having his oeuvre collected in volumes by Library of America is in itself an accolade, a sign of his place in the literature of his nation. Saul Bellow (1915-2005) was not short on acknowledgments of his stature as a writer, winning just about every literary prize going, including the Nobel in 1976.

The Embassy of FInland in the nation's capital has won a coveted Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification for it site design and practices. The embassy interior is shown here.  (Embassy of FInland)

A first: The green-minded Embassy of Finland wins a coveted LEED platinum certification

- The Washington Times

On-site composting, high efficiency water faucets, low energy consumption, bikes for staffers and no plastic cups on the premises - these are just a few measures one green-minded embassy has taken. And to much acclaim. The Embassy of Finland in the nation's capital has been awarded the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification - and the first embassy in the U.S. to win the ultimate designation. There's history. In previous years, the striking and beautifully designed diplomatic site has won a "green," then a "gold" designation. Such efforts can only enhance the nation's image on these shores and elsewhere.

Dangers of 'free' college

Once the feds pay the bill for publicly funded community colleges, they will determine which education plans constitute meaningful contributions to society ("Obama proposes publicly funded community colleges for all," Web, Jan. 9). We will then have a situation similar to the rationing of health care we are seeing under Obamacare.

Has U.S. forgotten God?

As we will soon begin to view political campaigns for next year's national election, it might be valuable to consult our history. It was James Madison, "father of the Constitution," who invoked the following: "We have staked the whole future of all our political institutions upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves, according to the Ten Commandments of God."

California rightly puts chicken first

Large majorities of both Republican and Democratic California voters passed the new farm animal protection law that just took effect this month, and they were right to do it ("Breaking eggs in California," Web, Jan. 7).

Illustration on competition between Jeb Bush and Mitt Romney for campaign funding by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

GOP heavyweights vie for the establishment endorsement

- The Washington Times

The word last week that 2012 GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney is thinking about a third run for the Oval Office took many Republicans and particularly many establishment Republicans by surprise. The Bush family's latest contender had already made it clear that he will run and his friends were working to clear the field for him, the talking heads were anointing him as the "adult" in the race, and other wannabes were supposedly reining in their ambitions.

From Salman Rushdie to Charlie Hebdo

Let's get a few things straight: The slaughter of eight satirical journalists in Paris last week was not a tragedy. It was an atrocity. While you may have been shocked by the attack on Charlie Hebdo, anyone who was surprised has not been paying close attention to the events unfolding over recent decades.

Investing in America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing in a better America

Warren Buffett became very rich and very famous because he is a terrific investor. Not everyone agrees with his political stances, but his ability to achieve great return on investment is unquestioned.

FILE - This Aug. 13, 2014 photo shows an array of mirrors at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating site in Primm, Nev. The largest solar power plant of its type in the world, promoted as a turning point in green energy, isn’t producing the expected energy and one of the reasons is as basic as it gets: The sun isn’t shining as often as expected. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Where the sun doesn’t shine

Solar panels are one of the favorite hopes on the left for clean and renewable, energy. The evangelists for the sun claim that solar power capacity will double this year, and point out to the credulous that government programs offer tax breaks and incentives to encourage Americans to put up solar panels, and government-funded solar farms, like California's Ivanpah facility, are popping up like mushrooms (which actually prefer dark places) across the country.

Paris no-show matches rest of presidency

President Obama's failure last week to make an appearance joining world leaders in solidarity against the terrorist attacks in Paris highlighted six years of failed leadership ("Obama's snub of Paris," Web, Jan. 12). This failure has resulted in the unfettered growth of al Qaeda and Islamic State terrorists throughout the Middle East, Africa and the world, and it puts America and the west at extreme risk.

Bleeding Arabian Satire Shield Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Charlie Hebdo and the pointed pen

France suffered through a horrifying series of terror attacks last week. Streets rang with the alarming sound of gunshots. Two agonizing hostage situations gripped the nation — and beyond. Blood was shed, and innocent life was lost.

In this March 11, 2013 file photo is a sign reading "Stop the Transcanada Pipeline" placed in a field near Bradshaw, Neb. Even if the Republican-led Congress approves the Keystone XL pipeline, not a drop of oil will flow through the system until Nebraska signs off on its route. The routing process is still before the state Supreme Court, and depending on how justices rule, it could be months or longer before any construction in Nebraska begins. (Associated Press)

Taking a vow of poverty

Cursing the darkness may be more satisfying than lighting a candle, but it ultimately keeps everyone in the dark. President Obama vows to veto construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, which the House approved by a wide margin on Friday. His steadfast opposition to the energy conduit from Canada places him squarely in league with those who measure human progress only with a thermometer.