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President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Morristown Municipal airport, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Critics call Trump ‘self-interested’ like it’s a bad thing

- The Washington Times

As a businessman, a builder and a real estate tycoon in the most fiercely competitive real estate market on the planet, President Trump has spent his entire life exercising his own considerable self-interest. He built a huge and admirable fortune trying to make a buck for himself.

Illustration on the rise of materialism and anti-religious bigotry on Capitol Hill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hate, Bernie style

Two remarkable things unfolded last week. The Democrats openly embraced socialism in the form of single-payer health care. And they announced a secular, anti-Christian test for public office. The two go together like Abbott and Costello. Or better yet, since this is far from funny, Marx and Lenin.

Illustration on CIA use of drones by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The CIA’s drones fly into a storm

The Central Intelligence Agency’s authority to use lethal force is usually discussed only in the quietest corners of the intelligence community. These authorities are usually implemented pursuant to carefully-prescribed top-secret “presidential determinations” that authorize specific actions.

Justin Kandor Causing Trouble in New Hampshire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Some New Hampshire candor about Jason Kander

Let America Vote founder Jason Kander is a smirking menace. The former Missouri secretary of state wants to come to New Hampshire, cast aspersions on our elections, and use his wokeness as a springboard to bigger things.

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sad tale of two stumbling parties

- The Washington Times

We’ve heard the words and music of this song before. The hoariest cliche in American politics, presented as accomplished fact by every wise head in academe and media after every wipe-out election, is that the losing party is finished. Kaput. Destroyed. Done for. Dead, as in the graveyard.

Royhingya refugees from Myanmar receiving food from Bangladeshi aid workers          Associated Press photo

A refugee emergency and the terrorism it breeds

Bangladesh has been a haven for the Rohingya people since they began fleeing unprovoked oppression in their home state of Rakhine on Myanmar’s western shore, bordering Bangladesh, in 2015. Denied citizenship in their own country, the Rohingya have been in conflict not only with the other citizens of Rakhine but also with the government of Myanmar, which considers many of them to be anti-government insurgents. The United Nations describes the Rohingya as one of the world’s most persecuted people.

Trump's Door and Wall Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MAGA and DACA

What does it mean to ‘Make America Great Again’? That’s a seemingly simple question with no simple answer, but an important part of it is certainly fixing our broken systems.

Illustration on possible solutions to the North Korea situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump, the statesman, at the U.N.

President Trump is right. His speech at the United Nations was his third act of Reagan-like statesmanship, after the historically accurate, morally rooted and inspirational speeches in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and Warsaw, Poland. This time, he pointedly spoke for those who cannot speak in Iran, North Korea, Venezuela, and suppressed people around the world. It was a tour de force, and it’s hard to disagree with any word. Once again, Ronald Reagan would be nodding.

Illustration on Russia's attacks on Ukraine by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Taking Putin seriously

President Trump mentioned the word sovereignty 21 times in his address to the United Nations Tuesday, but said little about Russia’s efforts to seize parts of Ukraine, piece by piece, and threaten other neighboring states.

In this June 2, 2017, file photo, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Scott Pruitt, in fight for EPA life — literally

- The Washington Times

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has apparently generated so much controversy that radical green peeps are threatening him with near-regularity, to the point he’s now getting extra armed protection. Seriously, folks, some perspective, please. Are trees that important?

Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year’s presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump’s favor.

Related Articles

Illustration on Hillary Clinton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The woman scorned, opening old sores

Feminist politics turned a corner with the final defeat of Hillary Clinton. You can feel it in and between the lines of her blame-game book, "What Happened." The exuberance of her supporters, which buoyed her in the campaign to elect the first woman president, has dissipated. All she has left is a memoir of an angry woman, raging that her time has passed, that the abundant fruit of opportunity that fell from the family tree was crushed beyond hopes of redemption and there's nothing left to put in a new bottle but old whine.

Illustration on Antifa's domestic terrorism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Antifa's 'domestic terrorist violence'

The serene, little university town of Charlottesville may have opened up a wound that will be with us for years to come. It might be more accurate to say reopened -- readers who are my age may remember the violence and destruction brought on by the anti-Vietnam War movement and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and its companions (comrades?) on the left. Now we're seeing it again with the Antifa thugs.

Kurt Warner illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Grooming more players for the gridiron

Before Week One of the National Football League began, more than 1,100 of the best football players in the world had their dreams end as NFL teams trimmed their rosters from 90 to 53 to start the regular season. Some of those players will sign with other teams. Others have been signed to a team's practice squad, which consists of 10 spots on each team where the player can practice with the team but can't play in the game.

Bringing terror and its practitioners into focus

Al Qaeda's horrendous attacks on Sept. 11, 2001 represented a transformative moment in the history of international terrorism, with a foreign terrorist group daring to deploy its operatives from its training camps in Afghanistan to inflict catastrophic damage on its adversary's soil, and with America deciding to counter this terrorist threat with all means necessary, including pursuing such terrorists wherever they operate.

Visitors walk by the map of two Koreas at the Imjingak Pavilion in Paju, South Korea, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. South Korea said Wednesday it conducted its first live-fire drill for an advanced air-launched cruise missile it says will strengthen its pre-emptive strike capability against North Korea in the event of crisis. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Kicking the carrot down the road

Somewhere over the rainbow, the United Nations has squeezed out another resolution ordering North Korea to be nice, to abandon its nuclear weapons, or else. Off in the great somewhere, where colors meet the clouds, there's faith that sanctions resolution No. 8 will succeed where the previous seven didn't. On the ground where reality unfolds, it's clear that only stronger medicine can cure the rogue regime of its practiced evil.

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, and Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, a key member of the group, walk through Statuary Hall at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. With President Donald Trump wanting a legislative solution to replace the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Meadows has said he will put together a working group to craft a conservative immigration plan. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Why the debt ceiling is important

When Jack Kent Cooke fired George Allen the elder as the coach of the Washington Redskins, he remarked that "I gave George an unlimited budget and he exceeded it." George should have been a congressman.

Serbia entitled to resolution 'carrot'

David Phillips ("Why Serbia must recognize Kosovo's independence," Web, Sept. 4) presents a very distorted and immature view of Kosovo's "independence." As is common with pro-Kosovo, Albanian Western "experts" and commentators, Mr. Phillips' piece presents no carrots to Serbia and offers no long-term solutions to the conflicted region other than Serbia giving up the spiritual Jerusalem of its Orthodox-Christian Serbs, who have resided there for over 1,300 years.

Left still puts party before nation

The U.S. economic boom is alive and well -- and expanding. As Stephen Moore ("The Trump boom arrives," Web, Sept. 10) aptly notes, it is undeniable and improving at a quickening rate. Plus, it's happening despite global distractions.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump sets clock for tax reform with unexpected move

The combination of the debt ceiling and the continuing resolution made it combustible, with the political reality that the party in power will be held responsible for keeping government open and functioning, particularly in the aftermath of a major natural disaster.

Seattle Storm fans and others cheer at a rally in support of Planned Parenthood before a WNBA basketball game between the Storm and the Chicago Sky on Tuesday, July 18, 2017, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Satanists and Planned Parenthood -- a match made in hell

- The Washington Times

Missouri has seen a resurgence of abortion clinics of late, thanks in large part to concerted pressures from Planned Parenthood, which sued -- successfully -- to overturn state laws requiring medical providers performing the procedure to be possessed of hospital admission privileges. And, thanks to the Satanic Temple.

President Donald Trump waits outside the West Wing of the White House for the arrival of Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, in Washington. ESPN distanced itself from anchor Jemele Hill's tweets one day after she called Trump "a white supremacist" and "a bigot."  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Quack attack: 27 psychiatrists pen anti-Trump book

- The Washington Times

Real psychiatrists are probably squirming in their office chairs at this -- but 27 of their professional colleagues have come together to write a book about President Donald Trump. Surprise, surprise, they find: Trump's an "antisocial" idiot with "malignant narcissism," and he's going down -- big time. And this is such a surprise because Trump, as these quack analysts acknowledge, isn't even their patient.

In this Sept. 6, 2017, photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, right, arrives for a meeting with House Republicans on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) ** FILE **

Paul Ryan tips RINO: Nobody really wants a wall

- The Washington Times

Speaker Paul Ryan reportedly said during a private dinner earlier this year that nobody but nobody in Congress wanted a border wall -- well, nobody except "one member," Breitbart reported, citing a one-on-one with the former congressman, Tom Tancredo. And with that, the establishment raises its head once more.

Display of Civility Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A nation built upon civility

Americans of every political stripe are disgusted by the disrespect, hatred, violence and fear displayed so often in our beloved nation and are doing something about it.

Illustration on the hazards of potential global cooling by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Preventing the other climate catastrophe

Climate cooling, as opposed to warming, presents serious problems for humanity. As cooling causes agriculture to fail, most of the world's population will starve and we will be reduced from its present level to about a million, hunting animals and collecting nuts and seeds for sustenance. This has happened before during the ice ages, when nomadic bands of prehistoric humans had to shelter in caves for protection from the cold, and had to rely on uncertain supplies of food.

Illustration on North Korea's martial mentality by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Countering North Korea's nuclear blackmail

North Korea's official statements following its recent underground nuclear test for the first time revealed plans to use its nuclear weapons to create an electromagnetic pulse (EMP).