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Protesters chant as they rally outside Gracie Mansion in New York City on Dec. 15.

Murders like New York’s are not the fault of City Hall

- The Washington Times

Last week’s police shootings in New York City have rather predictably set off an epidemic of finger-pointing. In the 1990s, when Timothy McVey blew up the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, President Clinton hinted not very subtly that the real fault lay with the “militia” movement. Later, politicians and some pundits blamed Sarah Palin, of all people, for the shooting of Rep. Gaby Giffords of Arizona, and when an emotionally disturbed Adam Lanza killed his mother, stole her guns and wreaked havoc in Newtown, Connecticut, two years ago, a chorus of finger-pointers blamed not Lanza, but the National Rifle Association and the manufacturer of the guns he used.

Illustration on the deterioration of arts and culture in American society by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Transformation and crisis at The New Republic

The crisis at The New Republic that led to the resignation of its editor, literary editor and numerous staff members is symptomatic of a broader cultural decline also manifest on the pages of The New York Times and other mainstream publications. Newspapers and magazines have been going out of business or are making desperate efforts to be more “readable” and “lively,” that is to say, more entertaining and better integrated into popular culture.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Complete Little Nemo’

Winsor McCay is widely regarded as one of America’s greatest cartoonists. His early 20th century comic strips (“Little Sammy Sneeze,” “Dream of the Rarebit Fiend”) and animated shorts (“Gertie the Dinosaur,” “The Sinking of the Lusitania”) are still among the most groundbreaking examples of both genres.

John Newton          Detail from a portrait by John Russell

The amazing grace of Christmas morn

- The Washington Times

In the clutter of Christmas morn, the Christ born in a manger 2,000 years ago lives, liberating the hearts of sinners and transforming the lives of the wicked. The redeeming power of the Christmas message is nowhere more vividly illustrated than in the incredible life of an English slaver named John Newton.

Illustration on the value of the Christmas story by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

There is everything to gain and nothing to lose in embracing the Christmas story

Suppose what some call the “Christmas story” is true — all of it, from the angels, to the shepherds, to the virgin birth, to God taking on human flesh. By this, I don’t mean to suggest it is true only for those who believe it to be true, but what if it is objectively true, no matter what the deniers say? What difference would it make? Should it make any difference?

Illustration on the order of the universe and the existence of a Creator by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Making sense of the Christmas mystery

The Christmas story of God, Creator of the universe, putting on a fleshly baby outfit and coming down to earth to be born in a dirty stable disguised as an infant, then eventually giving his life to save humanity, doesn’t make any sense to unbelievers. This frankly boggling account sometimes doesn’t even make sense to devoted Christians who pray, attend church and search the Bible to discover how and why God does what He does.

Power Plant Getting Taxed More by the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s green economic policies hit blacks hardest

The sad truth is President Obama’s agenda includes policies that preferentially harm blacks. In particular, Mr. Obama’s climate change policy, in effect, serves as a 21st-century version of Jim Crow laws owing to its economic impact on black households.

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University of Alabama at Birmingham President Ray Watts,left, and UAB Vice President for Financial Affairs and Administration Allen Bolton, right,  address the media during a news conference to discuss the results of their athletics strategic planning process and closing of the UAB football football, rifle, and bowling programs, Tuesday, De. 2, 2014 in Birmingham. Ala. (AP Photo/Tamika Moore, AL.com) MAGS OUT

An Alabama university drops football

It takes strength, courage and resolve on the part of young men to play football. Sometimes it requires even more strength, courage and resolve on the part of college and university administrators not to play football.

Illustration on media protection of the Obama administration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How do we protect Barack Obama today?

- The Washington Times

About six weeks before the 2012 presidential election, I was walking through Rockefeller Center in New York when I heard a woman's voice calling my name. I hesitated before I turned around: As a conservative in Gotham, I never know if I'll be accosted by a raving leftist screaming "fascist!" at me. (Yes, that happened.)

Keeping U.S. safe, free has costs

The world would be such a grand place if all children had something to eat, no one lied or cheated, courtesy was the rule and we all loved one another. The reality, however, is that there are some really evil people out there who could not care less about others and would just as soon kill some people as look at them.

Illustration on the moral and legal issues of CIA "torture" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The CIA and its torturers

When the head of the CIA's torture unit decided to destroy videotapes of his team's horrific work, he unwittingly set in motion a series of events that led to the release this week of the most massive, detailed documentation of unlawful behavior by high-ranking government officials and intentional infliction of pain on noncombatants by the United States government since the Civil War era. Here is the backstory.

Illustration on the damage done by false accusations of rape by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The feminist rape of reputation

Feminism is entering a new phase of the movement. You could call it the era of mea culpa. Feminism has rightly claimed "victim" status at the mercy of rapists, and now certain women have turned the tables and are making victims of men, but with slander, the rape of reputation. This isn't an "epidemic," as feminists have said rape is an epidemic, but the numbers are significant enough to make the headlines.

Six years of mayhem

As his sixth year in office draws to a close, President Obama continues to add to our list of problems. Republicans in charge of Congress must unite to reverse the flawed policies, executive orders and rules and regulations that have negatively affected our economy, military, security, health care, education and personal and religious freedoms.

Obama's Osama bin Laden Trophy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The White House keeps spinning

The release of a partisan Senate report on the CIA's past interrogation program has renewed the debate over the agency's use of enhanced interrogation methods. These are methods that the Obama administration has often denounced, even while taking credit for killing Osama bin Laden and while continuing the similarly controversial practice of lethal drone strikes.

Passersby exit an entrance to the main campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., Sunday, May 31, 1998. The university's endowment of nearly $13 billion makes it the richest in the world and, if ranked against Fortune 500 companies it would be in the top 25 percent, The Boston Globe reported Sunday. (AP Photo/Patricia McDonnell)

All about feelings: Ivy League law students now too 'traumatized' over Ferguson to take exams

- The Washington Times

It is a new educational phenomenon: Ivy League law students at three major universities - Columbia, Harvard and Georgetown University - are now exempt from taking final exams if they feel "traumatized" by the grand jury decisions made in Ferguson and New York City. The students are also being offered counseling if they need it. A few professors with impressive credentials now have a few questions.

A flag the flew over one of the ships during the Pearl Harbor attack is displayed on the dock during the Pearl Harbor memorial ceremony Sunday, Dec. 7, at the USS Edson in Bangor Township, Mich. (AP Photo/The Bay City Times, Yfat Yossifor) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL INTERNET OUT

ED FEULNER: Remembering true American heroes

Mention Hawaii to most people, and they think of sand and surf. But this sun-drenched vacation mecca is also home to one of the most infamous events in history: the Dec. 7, 1941 Japanese attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor.

Illustration on Congress' attacks on the CIA over EITs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Feinstein's tortured report

The "torture" report released Tuesday by California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein's Senate Select Committee on Intelligence is the latest attempt to prove that the George W. Bush administration's "enhanced interrogation techniques" used on a small number of terrorist prisoners amounted to torture and that the CIA lied to congress about them. It is a political condemnation of CIA conduct meant to erect another barrier to effective interrogation of terrorists, and it is wrong in its statement of the law.

The Death of Jobs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Beware of rosy job numbers

Don't be fooled by the everything's-coming-up-roses coverage that the national news media gave the Obama administration's job numbers last week.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as she leaves the Senate chamber after releasing a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks. Feinstein  branded the findings a "stain on the nation's history." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

EDITORIAL: The politics of torture

The Senate Intelligence Committee Tuesday released the results of the long anticipated investigation into the CIA's detentions and interrogation techniques in the prosecution of the "war" on Islamic terrorism, and there's something in it for nearly everyone.