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Mitt Romney

Another look at a savvy loser

- The Washington Times

Mitt Romney would defeat Barack Obama if they were matched again today. One or two polls say so. But they’re not matched today and a poll like that is only for a friendly conversation over a cup of coffee.

Waiting for Godot Court Ruling Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Suing the feds gets old

There is a reason so many citizens who reach the Supreme Court of the United States in their battles with the federal government and emerge to face reporters and their cameras are elderly, white-haired widows. Fighting the world’s largest law firm is like “Waiting for Godot,” but worse. Samuel Beckett’s absurdist play was fiction, but the ludicrous lengths to which federal lawyers go to avoid Judgment Day is all too real. Stanley K. Mann of Colorado, now 82, spent 20 years awaiting that day.

** FILE ** House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke)

Clinging to a tax-and-spend doctrine

The Obama administration continues to run up big budget deficits and huge long-term debts that threaten our economic future and put our national security in peril.

Congressional Internet Regulation and Taxation Plan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Choosing between two Internet evils

For the past several years, a group of senators has been desperate to enact a tax on Internet sales, attempting a number of strategies that have, thankfully, failed.

Iraq ISIS ISIL Jihadi Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The radical side of social media

The British accent heard from the man who brutally murdered U.S. journalist James Foley last week is another reminder that British citizens are traveling to Syria to join terrorist organizations in unprecedented numbers. In the past few years, the Internet, which quickly spread the grisly video of his death far and wide, has transformed how the toxic message of radical Islam and jihad in Syria, which inspires these men, can be spread.

Flag of Uslam Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Finally confronting the Islamist threat

America’s inconsistent response to the current Islamic State atrocities indicates that we are failing to understand, or deliberately ignoring, the facts that drive the terrorist organization’s ideology.

FILE - In this June 23, 2014 file photo, Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., takes questions from reporters in New York. On Tuesday, June 24, 2014, Rangel, 84, is running for his 23rd term in the House of Representatives and is facing what could be his tightest race, the Democratic primary for the 13th Congressional District. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

The Republican racist myth

Charles Rangel is peddling a libel, and Republicans should say so, loudly and often.

Burger King's "King" Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Chasing Burger King to Canada

Burger King’s effort to acquire Tim Hortons, a Canadian purveyor of coffee and doughnuts, is a good business decision, but its choice to locate corporate headquarters north of the border would be the direct result of President Obama’s anti-business tax policies.

President Golf  Inconvenience Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The duffer-in-chief

President Obama stood before the cameras to share his outrage at the horrific beheading of a heroic young American reporter by the Islamic State. As soon as the cameras were turned off, he headed off to the golf course to tee it up with a few of his friends.

Banker Follows Graduates Illustration by William Brown

Digitizing the authentic education

Thousands of moms and dads, following the script written into an autumn ritual of the middle class, are preparing to say farewell to the sons and daughters they’ve loved, nurtured and tried to civilize for nearly two decades.

Turkey Davutoglu Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Talking Turkey with an Islamist academician

As Recep Tayyip Erdogan ascends Thursday to the presidency of Turkey, his hand-picked successor, Ahmet Davutoglu, simultaneously assumes Mr. Erdogan’s old job of prime minister.

Related Articles

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, right, assigned Missouri Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson, left, to defuse violent protests sparked by the fatal shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

The wrong way to restore peace in Ferguson

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, called out the National Guard on Monday to restore order to the streets of Ferguson. Heavily armed soldiers will take the place of even more heavily armed police officers who had been assigned to prevent looting as the mobs gathered to riot.

Travis County Special prosecutor Michael McCrum announced that Texas Gov. Rick Perry has been indicted by a grand jury in Austin, Texas on Friday, Aug. 15, 2014.  Gov. Rick Perry, 63, was charged with abuse of official capacity, a first-degree felony, and coercion of a public official related to his effort last year to force District Attorney Rosemary Lehmberg to resign after her drunken driving arrest. (AP Photo/Austin American-Statesman, Rodolfo Gonzalez)

The 'case' against Rick Perry

Prosecutors in Texas could have done the nation a service with the indictment of Gov. Rick Perry of Texas. The indictment of him is so transparent as vindictive prosecution that it will surely topple by its own weight, and beyond that, it could focus needed light on the urgent need for prosecutorial reform.

Obama Logo Broken Glass Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's teetering presidency

Barack Obama's presidency isn't just shrinking, it's losing support among its most critical point — its base.

BOOK REVIEW: 'War!: What Is It Good For?"

Now comes Ian Morris with humor and a swath of historical data to argue that the 15,000 years of bloody warfare that have killed countless millions have actually made us safer, wealthier and longer-lived.

FILE - This May 22, 2013 file photo shows Internal Revenue Service (IRS) official Lois Lerner on Capitol Hill in Washington. The IRS says it has lost a trove of emails to and from a central figure in the agency's tea party controversy. The IRS told congressional investigators Friday it cannot locate many of Lois Lerner's emails prior to 2011 because her computer crashed that year. Lerner headed the IRS division that processed applications for tax-exempt status. The IRS acknowledged last year that agents had improperly scrutinized applications for tax-exempt status by tea party and other conservative groups. The IRS was able to generate 24,000 Lerner emails from 2009 to 2011 because Lerner had copied in other IRS employees. But an untold number are gone. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Intolerance on the left

We often hear those on the right branded as "intolerant." We're all a bunch of extremists who just want to shut down the other side, right?

Mosul Dam Airstrike Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Islam's dilemma over the Islamic State

The jihadist forces of the Islamic State are strewing a path of atrocities, destruction and conquest across the heartland of the Middle East.

**FILE** An enormous crowd takes part in the Sept. 12 march on Washington to protest government spending and health care reform proposals. The field plan for a series of grassroots demonstrations Tuesday to push President Obama's health care agenda show the events will be tightly scripted with plans for "escalation," but organizers insist there is no comparison to rowdy town hall meetings and "tea party" protests challenging White House policies that they say conservatives staged. (Mary F. Calvert/The Washington Times)

HILGEMANN: The value of thirty seconds

Thirty seconds. That's the amount of time that seemingly all politics boil down to these days. TV ads, radio ads, sound bytes; all of them thirty seconds or less. While most Americans rightfully bemoan this relatively new and often partisan phenomenon, there's another critically important thirty seconds happening over and over in homes, offices, and backyards from Alaska to New Hampshire.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Arsonist'

The main characters of Sue Miller's new novel, "The Arsonist," have all recently settled in the New Hampshire village of Pomeroy. To Frankie Rowley, it isn't an entirely new place because she spent summers on the family farm her parents Sylvia and Alfie inherited.

FILE - This Aug. 9, 2011 file photo shows a Wall Street street sign near the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. Global stock markets mostly rose Friday, Aug. 15, 2014 cheered by the prospect of more gains on Wall Street and a sense that Ukraine tensions are easing.  (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Secular stagnation is a cover-up

Secular stagnation is all wrong. It's a cover-up for mistaken economic policies that began in the Bush years and intensified during the Obama administration.