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President Obama (Associated Press)

A dog whistle by the master

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama has the master wordsmith’s gift for bending language, saying something that sounds good, but heard as something not so good.

Sen. Jim Webb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Jim Webb, a maverick with a message

It’s going to be easy — and fun for some — to dismiss the presidential candidacy of former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb, if he actually decides to run.

An attitude of gratitude

Is there anything in the world that can stop the United States of America? We were born struggling against the British Empire — the most powerful entity at the time — and we totally wiped the floor with those crumpet-gobblers.

Congress Controls Purse Strings to Neutralize Executive Orders Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The coming Washington war

If you thought the bare-knuckled, no-holds-barred, midterm elections were rough, the last two years of Barack Obama’s presidency will make that look like a Sunday school picnic.

Illustration on a coalition government for Libya by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Opening the door to a peaceful Libya

We all remember how in February 2011 the Arab Spring reached Libya, and Libyans came together to overthrow a 42-year-old dictatorship that crushed any semblance of democracy, freedom and free will.

"The Skeleton Road" by Val McDermid. Book jacket courtesy Grove Atlantic.

Who’s the corpse in the Edinburgh pinnacle?

Atragedy embedded in a love story is vividly relived in the setting of the brutal Balkan wars in this gripping and expertly plotted thriller.

Illustration on Bill Cosby by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Bill Cosby’s message survives personal disaster

What’s fascinating about the coverage of the persuasive accusations against Bill Cosby, now 18 and rising, is that race doesn’t dominate. There’s an outcry at the abuse of women, and he’s shredded the healthy black-father family man image he carefully cultivated on his sitcom, but you don’t read or hear notice taken of the fact that the women who say he drugged and raped them were usually white.

John Winthrop Portrait

The truly first Thanksgiving

What sustained both Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay was that, thankfully, America could be carved into a better community for all, providing that elusive but mysterious challenge that was missing from the lives of so many in England.

Death of the Sexual Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The joy of sex is over

So this is how the sexual revolution is ending. It is ending with gangs of angry women recalling alleged sexual assaults up to a half-century ago. Their alleged assailant in this case is the avuncular 77-year-old Bill Cosby.

Related Articles

Sen. Barry Goldwater, then the GOP presidential nominee, and his vice presidential running mate, Rep. William E. Miller of New York, appear together on Capitol Hill, Aug. 14, 1964. In the fall election, the Conservative Party took the lead in promoting Goldwater after word went out that the state GOP was not to lift a finger for its presidential nominee. Although Goldwater lost New York by nearly 3 million votes on Election Day in 1964, he had a lasting impact on the state's fledgling conservative movement. (Associated Press)

1964 'Go with Goldwater' rally bore fruit in the Reagan presidency

Back in 1964, "conservative" was a dirty word in New York Republican circles. The party was under the thumb of the original RINO (Republican in name only) Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, who believed he was destined to be elected president in 1964.

Illustration on government abuse of civil forfeiture laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The menace of civil forfeiture

Whether your metric is the stonewalling and misleading of congressional investigations or the racially discriminatory enforcement of civil rights laws in violation of the Constitution's equal-protection principles, the Obama Justice Department is the most politicized in the nation's history.

Barry Goldwater greets an Indianapolis crowd during a campaign tour in Oct. 1964. (AP Photo

Good for a story, and good for the conscience

- The Washington Times

Barry Goldwater was the favorite candidate of every correspondent who appreciated a good story. I covered his 1964 presidential campaign for the old National Observer, the late, great Dow Jones newsweekly, and he never let us down. He was blunt, irreverent and unpredictable, often mocking the press caricature of him as a reckless gunslinger from the Old West. He was great copy.

Sen. Barry Goldwater, Arizona Republican, announces his candidacy for the U.S. presidency in Phoenix on Jan. 3, 1964.

The man who ignited a revolution

Who was Barry Goldwater, universally known as "Mr. Conservative," and how did his '64 presidential campaign ignite a conservative revolution?

President Ronald Reagan, right, greets Sen. Barry Goldwater, R-Ariz., in the Rose Garden at the White House during a ceremony to start National Partiotism Week in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Feb. 17, 1981.  (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)

'You and I have a rendezvous with destiny'

Excerpts from the speech delivered by Ronald Reagan on Oct. 27, 1964, in support of Barry Goldwater's candidacy for president. It affectionately has become known as "The Speech" and is widely credited for catapulting Mr. Reagan and his vision for conservatism onto the national stage.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Rebel Yell'

For two years, 1861 to 1863, Gen. Thomas Jonathan ("Stonewall") Jackson, West Point graduate, hero of the Mexican war, and in the interim a quirky eccentric former Virginia Military Institute professor plagued by a host of 19th-century afflictions, became not just a hero of the Confederacy, but a brilliant military tactician who out-thought, out-anticipated, outmaneuvered and outfought the enemy.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Resilience Dividend'

Resilience, as defined by Judith Rodin is the capacity of any entity, ranging from an individual, a corporation or a society, to pre-emptively prepare for sudden disruptions that were unpredicted, to recover from them and then to take advantage of new opportunities produced by the disruption for further growth and expansion.

Barry Goldwater waves to delegates inside the Cow Palace at the 1964 Republican National Convention in San Francisco. As a senator, he strongly argued that it is a core American value and in the country's best interest to stand by Taiwan as it faced an existential threat from tyrannical communists. Goldwater's contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific. He championed the passage of the Taiwan Relations Act (TRA), a landmark piece of legislation, which through bipartisan support, was signed into law in April 1979. To this day, that law provides the bedrock for U.S.-Taiwan relations. (Associated Press)

Goldwater: Unwavering friend of 'Free China'

Barry Goldwater is rightfully an icon of the American conservative movement for decades since the 1960s, and it is a privilege and an honor to contribute to his remembrance on the 50th anniversary of his presidential campaign. What many Americans may not know, however, is the role then-Sen. Goldwater played in the U.S. relations with my country, the Republic of China (ROC, Taiwan), usually termed by the senator as "Free China." His contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific as well.

Citizens hold signs at the Westminster Board of Health meeting on the proposed tobacco ban, at the Westminster Elementary School, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014, in Westminster, Ma. A public meeting on a central Massachusetts town's proposed first-in-the-nation ban on tobacco and nicotine sales ended early Wednesday because officials say the crowd was getting too unruly to continue. (AP Photo/Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Steve Lanava)

EDITORIAL: Anti-smoking fanaticism

Prohibition is back in Westminster, a rural town of about 8,000 near the New Hampshire border in north-central Massachusetts. The town's three-member board of health said it would prohibit the sale of all tobacco products within the town's borders.

A demonstration for Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater (right) is held on the final night of the Republican National Convention in San Francisco on July 16, 1964. Goldwater lost his presidential bid to incumbent Lyndon B. Johnson, who ascended to the presidency in 1963 following President John F. Kennedy's assassination. (Associated Press)

Goldwater's 'The Conscience of a Conservative' transformed American politics

Barry Goldwater's little 115-page book, "The Conscience of a Conservative," was published in 1960, long before running for president had occurred to the senator from Arizona, or much of anybody else. But Goldwater was already the undisputed champion of conservative ideas and policies in the Senate, and had traveled thousands of miles making speeches, campaigning for aspiring congressmen and senators, and raising money for the Republican cause.

Sen. Barry Goldwater rallied a new conservative generation during his presidential campaign in 1964. Although he lost that contest, his landmark philosophies of conservatism still echo a half-century later. As Goldwater's son, Barry Goldwater Jr., reminds us, conservatives must present positive answers to national problems, not just condemn them. (Associated Press)

The father of American conservatism

A half-century ago, Sen. Barry Goldwater strode to the podium of the Republican National Convention in San Francisco to accept his party's presidential nomination. He declared, "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vise." Let me remind you further: "Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue."