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Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, wearing an army uniform, ride on an armed truck to patrol the international airport in Sanaa, Yemen, Saturday, March 28, 2015. Yemen's President Abed Raboo Mansour Hadi, speaking at an Arab summit in Egypt on Saturday, called Shiite rebels who forced him to flee the country "puppets of Iran," directly blaming the Islamic Republic for the chaos there and demanding airstrikes against rebel positions continue until they surrender. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Why Yemen matters

Thoughts on the shifting dynamics in the Middle East.

President Barack Obama speaks about payday lending and the economy, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at Lawson State Community College in Birmingham, Ala.  (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Barack Obama’s love bomb offensive

- The Washington Times

President Obama says Rudy Giuliani was wrong. He does, too, love America. That’s good enough for me. He says he’s a Christian, despite his constant love bombs for Islam, and if that’s good enough for God it’s good enough for me, too. Conversations between believers and the Almighty are confidential, and have yet to be cracked by the National Security Agency (but we can be sure they’re working on it).

Obamacare in a death spiral illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obamacare flying machine begins a death spiral

The Supreme Court decision in King v. Burwell, the case challenging the Obama administration’s decision to award tax credits for health insurance sold through federally established exchanges, could turn on the question of whether a ruling that ends the tax credits on federal exchanges might cause something known as a “death spiral” in health insurance markets.

Warren’s pitchfork brigade skewers the facts

Ted Cruz’s announcement this week that he’s running for president has officially kicked off the 2016 primary season and has put the pressure on other potential GOP candidates to declare. On the Democratic side of the scrum there is Elizabeth Warren, whom progressives hope is the candidate-in-waiting to lead their pitchfork brigade against the “1 percent.” While it’s still unclear whether Mrs. Warren will announce, it’s assured that her income inequality position will drive a major plank in the eventual Democratic nominee’s platform.

Illustration on the lack of U.S abortion data by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unhealthy state of abortion statistics

Abortion advocates in Congress and in state legislatures claim that abortions are “safe.” Yet numerous, long-standing problems at the state and federal level illustrate that the abortion data collection and reporting system in the United States is haphazard and dysfunctional, making assertions about “abortion safety” unreliable.

Illustration on the Cotton letter's impact on nuclear talks with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tom Cotton, tragic hero

The snarky quip attributed to 19th-century French Foreign Minister Charles Maurice de Talleyrand — “It was worse than a crime; it was a blunder” — has recently been making the rounds to deride a letter written by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and signed by 46 other senators.

Illustration on entering the presidential race by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The learning curve of a candidate

As we stand about 20 months out from Election Day 2016, I have much to learn in terms of becoming both a better candidate and a better potential president of the United States. I do not take the opportunity lightly.

Illustration on the value of the U.S. satellite system by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Launching the crown jewels

If America didn’t have hundreds of satellites in orbit, our Air Force, Navy and Army — as well as our intelligence agencies — wouldn’t be deaf, dumb and blind. But they’d come close. Our aircraft, ships and submarines are designed to depend on satellites for their high-technology capabilities.

Cherry-picking statistics illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Missing the mark on climate change skepticism

During the past few weeks, a series of articles in the press have implied that Willie Soon, a well-known global-warming skeptic, had violated ethical standards by failing to disclose information about research funding.

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A before and after facelift on a 67-year-old man. (ASAPS photo)

'Dramatic' increase: Plastic surgery for men up by 43 percent as they compete in the job market

- The Washington Times

The vanity business appears is flourishing. The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery announced Thursday that Americans spent over $12 billion on assorted procedures in 2014. One sector is on the increase. "More men are turning to aesthetic cosmetic procedures, with dramatic increases seen in both surgical and nonsurgical options over the past 5 years and a 43 percent increase overall," the organization stated.

Intentional trashing of the Constitution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The president's constitutional end run for Iran

Congress is struggling to thwart President Obama's attempt to strike a nuclear deal with Iran on his own, in violation of the Constitution. Lawmakers are taking unprecedented measures — the invitation to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the Corker-Menendez bill, and even a letter to Tehran to stop it. None of this would be necessary if the U.S. Senate had done its job instead of rubber-stamping John Kerry's nomination as secretary of state.

In this image made from video posted on a social media account affiliated with the Islamic State group on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, militants take sledgehammers to an ancient artifact in the Ninevah Museum in Mosul, Iraq. The extremist group has destroyed a number of shrines --including Muslim holy sites -- in order to eliminate what it views as heresy. The militants are also believed to have sold ancient artifacts on the black market in order to finance their bloody campaign across the region. (AP Photo via militant social media account)

Destruction in civilization’s cradle

Trashing antiquities and traces of early civilization is so easy a caveman can do it. Steeped in ruinous belief, the cavemen of the Islamic State are adding to their criminal rampage across the Middle East, smashing and looting the priceless artifacts made by their ancestors in a more constructive era.

Just-cut stacks of $100 bills make their way down the production line at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing's Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Billionaires? The world has 1,826 of them - and 541 live in America

- The Washington Times

There’s lots of billionaires out there — 1,826, to be exact, according to recent painstaking research of Forbes magazine. Mote than a third prefer the urbane and urban life, and the Big Apple is the town of choice. The publication says that with 78 resident billionaires, New York City has the largest uber-rich population on the planet. But wait, there’s more.

A Likely Exhibit at the Obama Presidential Library Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A presidential library for Obama's fairy tales

Sometime this month, the Barack Obama Foundation will likely announce the specific site of the president's library. It's expected to be in Chicago, but that's not the big news. Rather, the 14th presidential library, like the 44th occupant of the White House, will probably be the most controversial because it will stray so far from the aims of the original one begun by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939. At that time, FDR donated his personal and presidential papers to the federal government, even pledging part of his estate in Hyde Park, New York, for the site.

Illustration on the funding of green anti-oil campaigns by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Overseas money buys more than just Hillary

The news that several foreign governments, including Saudi Arabia, gave millions to the Clinton Foundation, including donations while Hillary Clinton was secretary of state, has riled up Republicans. But if congressional Republicans want to hold hearings, they shouldn't limit the subject to Hillaryland. Foreign money isn't exclusive to the Clintons, and it may be coming into more serious play in influencing U.S. energy policy.

** FILE ** Former U.N. Ambassador John R. Bolton (Associated Press)

John Bolton back in action, endorsing three 'national security' candidates

- The Washington Times

The man who endorsed 87 "national security" candidates and donated close to $500,000 during the 2014 midterms is back in action. Former United Nations ambassador John Bolton announced Thursday that he was backing Sen. David Vitter of Louisiana in his gubernatorial quest in the state; Rep. Ron DeSantis, the incumbent Congressman from Florida's 6th district, and Dr. Paul Chabot, candidate for Congress in California's 31st district.

No more Clinton presidencies

The very last thing America needs is President Hillary Rodham Clinton. Her entire tenure as secretary of state was a disaster that has left the world in ruins. And who can forget her years as first lady (millennials fortunately missed it), during which she declared herself "Queen Hillary" and ordered Secret Service to keep out of her sight as she walked the halls of the White House?

Martin O'Malley (Associated Press)

Trifling with the iron rule of politics

- The Washington Times

Conventional wisdom teaches that nothing succeeds like success, but the unwary politician forgets the more important Pruden Rule, which reflects both politics and life: "Nothing recedes like success." Conventional wisdom is made of two parts gossamer and one part each of fog and smoke. The Pruden Rule is cast iron.

A Secret Service officer and Secret Service agents provide security as Marine One carries President Barack Obama off the South Lawn of the White House, on Thursday, March 12, 2015, in Washington. Obama to traveling to Los Angeles for an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live, and a DNC fundraiser. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

No time for ‘boys will be boys’

The days of the Secret Service agent as superhero are long gone. Instead of men like Clint Hill flying into the back seat of the Kennedy motorcade to protect the first lady after the assassination in Dallas, or of the stoic agents of a later time who surrounded Ronald Reagan with their bodies and got him to safety after John Hinckley's failed assassination attempt, the men of today's security detail appear to be rude, raucous, unfocused college frat boys.

Left back by class warfare

Three recent developments should have had President Obama and liberals everywhere grinding their teeth.

President-elect Barack Obama (left) stands with Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., after announcing that she is his choice as Secretary of State during a news conference in Chicago on Dec. 1, 2008. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Obama and the Clinton emails

Hillary Rodham Clinton, the former first lady, U.S. senator from New York and secretary of state, used a private email server for all of her emails when she was President Obama's secretary of state from 2009 to 2013.

'Net Neutrality' Brings Regulation of the Pulpit Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Misplaced blessing for ‘net neutrality’

When the Federal Communications Commission approved the Open Internet Order last month, it was an unlikely assault on religious liberty. But America's religious leaders didn't say so. As it turns out, men and women of the cloth gave "net neutrality" a blessing.

Hillary Rodham Clinton answers questions at a news conference at the United Nations, Tuesday, March 10, 2015.   Clinton conceded that she should have used a government email to conduct business as secretary of state, saying her decision was simply a matter of "convenience."  (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

The saboteur of Hillary’s ambitions

Hillary Clinton has been a reflection of the changing images of women in America for decades. She's had more reincarnations than Shirley MacLaine, more fashion makeovers than Cher, more comebacks from bad press than Madonna. The images always need updating. She's the life-size balloon toy, weighted at the bottom, that a child smacks over and watches with surprise and suspicion when it bobs back upright.

Hillary Rodham Clinton answers questions at a news conference at the United Nations, Tuesday, March 10, 2015.   Clinton conceded that she should have used a government email to conduct business as secretary of state, saying her decision was simply a matter of "convenience." (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

E-gate epidemics

Former CIA Director David Petraeus plea-bargained to a misdemeanor count of unauthorized removal and retention of classified material after having given classified government information to his onetime mistress, Paula Broadwell. How was Gen. Petraeus' transgression uncovered? By exposure of a nongovernment email account that he had set up with to communicate with Ms. Broadwell free of CIA scrutiny.

Obamacare unsalvageable

The March 4 article "Supreme Court tries to make sense of poorly drafted Obamacare language" (Web) reflects the fundamental problem with the entire Obamacare process, not just the issue currently before the Supreme Court. Poor language? No, Obamacare is poorly understood, specified and designed.