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Hiroshima

No second thoughts about a bomb for Hiroshima

- The Washington Times

The pointless debate continues. As reliable as the arrival of the scorching heat and drenching humidity of August, comes the debate (mostly by academics) over whether the United States is guilty of moral outrage for having dropped the atomic bombs on Japan on Aug. 6 and 9, 1945, to put an end to the carnage of World War II.

Illustration on the virtues of the private Donald Trump               The Washington Times

The two Donald Trumps

Love him or hate him, no one has been able to figure out Donald Trump. No one, that is, except Norma Foerderer.

Illustration on Russian advances in the arctic by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Playing catch-up in the Arctic

The U.S. Government Accountability Office says that the Obama administration is forcing our military to measure ice levels in the resources-rich Arctic. The president’s thinking, according to reports, is that shrinking ice could force us to institute a “military and homeland security presence” in the region.

Rica Madrid poses for a photograph as she rolls a joint in her home on the first day of legal possession of marijuana for recreational purposes, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, in Washington. Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser defied threats from Congress by implementing a voter-approved initiative on Thursday, making the city the only place east of the Mississippi River where people can legally grow and share marijuana in private. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Tracking the trends

Why do we follow the news? To be informed, of course. We naturally want to be aware of what’s happening at home and around the world.

Illustration on the civil rights of the unborn by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the abortion tide turns

Anew Facebook profile photo is beginning to spread on the Internet, especially among members of the rising millennial generation. It’s a picture of a baby within the womb. Superimposed on the baby is an equal sign.

Illustration of myths about the benefits of raising the capital gains tax by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five myths about capital gains taxes

The late, great Jack Kemp, an architect of the Reagan tax cuts, used to say “without capital, capitalism is just another ism.” Capital is the plant, the machinery, the computers, and trucks that businesses invest in to become productive and efficient providers of goods and services.

Empowering individual workers rather than union bosses

This week, Sen Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, and Rep. Tom Price, Georgia Republican, introduced a new proposal to rebalance the rights and the law regarding employees and union bosses. The Employee Rights Act (ERA) is a package of widely supported reforms that will stop workplace abuses of both union and non-union employees by big labor unions. The ERA gives individual employees the power to control their own money, personal information, and choice for legal representation in the workplace.

Illustration on arming airline pilots by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring safety in airliner cockpits

Airline pilots have always been armed, except for a period from 1988 to 2002 when passivity in the face of violence somehow seemed logical. After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, many wondered why pilots were ever disarmed. Congress passed the law that rearmed airline pilots with large, bipartisan, veto proof majorities in both houses of Congress. Rearming airline pilots has proven to be safe, very inexpensive and a highly effective deterrent to those who would use civilian airliners filled with innocent people as weapons of mass destruction.

Illustration on Union violence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Closing a union-violence loophole

On July 20, U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson sentenced Joseph Dougherty, the former boss of Philadelphia-based Local 401 of the Ironworkers union, to 19 years in prison for “overseeing a years-long campaign of sabotage, arson, and intimidation,” as Philadelphia Inquirer staff writer Jeremy Roebuck put it. Mr. Dougherty’s targets were nonunion construction employees and employers.

(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life’s a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

“The slippery slope” doesn’t frighten very many people in Washington because that’s where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it’s usually quite profitable. But it’s a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

There’s good news about third-party candidates

The conventional wisdom is that an independent presidential bid by New York billionaire Donald Trump would harm the Republican candidate in 2016. That’s probably incorrect. Most often, significant independent general-election candidacies harm the incumbent or incumbent party more than they do the challenging party.

Illustration contrasting Reagan's dealings with the Soviets and Obama's with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Barack Obama, you’re no Ronald Reagan’

In a recent interview defending the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, President Obama argued that that his approach to Iran is essentially the same as that which Ronald Reagan took toward the Soviet Union. Mr. Obama said that ” where I completely admire him was his recognition that [an agreement would be worth doing] if you were able to verify an agreement that you would negotiate with the evil empire that was hell-bent on our destruction and was a far greater existential threat to us than Iran will ever be.”

Related Articles

Illustration on questions to ask Obama by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Serious questions for a coddled president

There's nothing quite like the look of a jerk whose smug omniscience gets shattered by a singular sound -- that of a reporter asking a serious question. Normally, the only sound President Obama experiences from journalists is the slurping one hears when boots are being licked.

Iran deal should be wake-up call

I've been an independent voter all of my 49 voting years. I have voted for both Democrats and Republicans, but have allegiance to neither. President Obama has not impressed me much, but until today, I was never fearful of him. The Iran nuclear agreement has changed that.

Daly Simmons, 26, sits as she prays in front of a makeshift memorial outside the Armed Forces Career Center Saturday, July 18, 2015, in Chattanooga, Tenn.    Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez, of Hixson, Tenn., attacked two military facilities on Thursday, in a shooting rampage that killed four Marines and one U.S. Navy sailor.  (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)

A call to arms

Chattanooga joins Fort Hood and Little Rock as indictments of the continuing failure of the nation's strategy for eliminating the threat of Islamic terrorism. The man entrusted with the responsibility for keeping America safe won't even call the threat by its right name. Hint: It's not "workplace violence."

Dinesh D'Souza. ** FILE **

The deprogramming of Dinesh D'Souza

Arrogance is ugly wherever found, and it's particularly ugly in a judge with the power to deprive a man of his freedom. Dinesh D'Souza is an author, filmmaker and onetime college president who was convicted of violating campaign finance law.

Hillary Clinton's shifting identity

Hillary Clinton's political decolletage has remained modest even as her chief rival for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, Bernie Sanders, lets it all hang out ("Hillary Clinton's identity crisis confuses followers," Web, July 16). Hillary's apologists, water-carriers, flacks, advisers, spinners and hangers-on apparently approved revealing something more in her economic policy address, although perhaps she should have maintained the mystery.

Mutual Dislike for Common Core Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tracking bipartisan opposition to Common Core

Last week a bipartisan Senate majority voted to reauthorize and update the Bush era "No Child Left Behind" legislation that has been used by the Obama administration to essentially force the states to adopt controversial federally mandated "Common Core" curriculum requirements. The Senate bill gives states the right to opt out of Common Core and even stronger language was included earlier in a House-passed version of the reauthorization.

Moore Chart to accompany article that appears July 20, 2015

America's government debt bomb

I'm asked every day if America is the next Greece or Detroit or Puerto Rico -- and the answer is an unequivocal no. The U.S. economy -- especially the private sector -- is structurally very healthy. That wasn't the case on the eve of the great financial meltdown of 2008 when American companies and households were leveraged up to their eyebrows.

Illustration on the Kurds as an effective foe to ISIS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Arming the Kurds to defeat ISIS

In the Game of Thrones in Mesopotamia, the scenario is as Byzantine as it gets, and Team Obama is handling a complex diplomatic and military challenge, with the lives of millions of civilians and combatants in the balance.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Muse'

When a writer who has spent his entire life in the publishing business sits down to write his first novel, what does he write about? Well, that was easy -- publishing, of course.

Illustration on the parameters of televised presidential debates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Striking a balance in televised presidential debates

Increasingly, countries all over the world -- particularly emerging democracies -- are making leaders' debates a part of their electoral processes. In large part, these debates have been inspired by the United States' general election presidential debates, which are carried live on major television networks worldwide.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's changing directions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary's identity crisis

Hillary Clinton's schizophrenic policy positions were on full display at her Monday speech in New York where she laid out her economic platform.