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Illustration on the deteriorating economy by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

A slam dunk for Republicans

A menacing black cloud is looming over our economy that should make the 2016 presidential election a slam dunk for Republicans — depending on who the GOP nominates this summer.

Millennials’ time to choose

The younger generation is tired of the set party rhetoric that permeates every area of society and we are ready for it to change.

Illustration on the need for impartiality in the courts by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Being fair and neutral

Americans rely on fair and impartial courts to safeguard the rights and freedoms they hold dearest. We can be confident in the courts’ authority to safeguard those rights only if we believe that judges are upholding the rule of law, ensuring fairness and fulfilling their obligations with objectivity and neutrality.

Difficult Diplomacy with Bahrain Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Bahrain bullies

Bahrain King Hamad al Khalifa visited President Vladimir Putin in Russia this week in a perfectly-timed reminder of how drastically the Obama administration has failed to handle relations with the small Gulf kingdom over the last five years.

Illustration of various valentines and postcards sent to Congress in support of Woman's suffrage             The Washington Times

Veiled valentines and suffragettes, 1916

The story of the women’s movement for the 19th Amendment or — voting rights amendment — is well known, in terms of the dramatic public demonstrations — from picketing, parades, prison sentences and hunger strikers.

Illustration on the truth about gun control by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Why gun control is a loser for the Democrats

There is nothing so comforting as a closely held prejudice, even when it repeatedly harms you. The white-hot passion of Democratic politicians to restrict and even strip Americans of their constitutionally guaranteed right to buy, own, keep, shoot and carry firearms continues as a monument to self-abuse.

U.N. Policies on Global Warming Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The politics behind the anti-fossil fuels campaign

History shows Earth’s climate goes through cycles, long and short, tied to a variety of natural factors. In the latter part of the 20th century, some scientists began to wonder about the causes of a modest warming, then cooling, then warming, which had been occurring since the mid-1800s. They also began to worry about the possible implications of continued warming.

After a speech at the Illinois State Capitol, President Barack Obama stops at the Hoogland Center for the Arts in Springfield, Ill.(Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune via AP)

Obama is no incompetent

While he was mocked for his performance in the last debate and had a disappointing showing in New Hampshire, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said what none of his rivals are willing to admit: “Let’s dispel [sic] with the fiction that Barack Obama doesn’t know what he’s doing. He knows exactly what he’s doing. He is trying to change this country” — with astonishing success.

Illustration on unconventional war by Linas Garsys/The Washington Tmes

Winning an unconventional war

War is — and always will be — hell. The Law of Armed Conflict is not meant to change that — only to make it a little less hellish. There are weapons you agree not to use. In exchange, your enemy doesn’t use those weapons against you. You treat captured combatants humanely. You expect the same when your soldiers are taken prisoner.

Draining Military Morale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The military’s malaise

There’s a cloud of malaise worthy of Jimmy Carter that has settled over the nation’s military. The man who should be able to clear away the cloud, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, won’t be able to do anything about it.

This image provided buy the Library of Congress shows an artists rendering of the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. (Associated Press)

Historical loops of presidents and wars

This Presidents Day, when we commemorate the past and present leaders of this country, it’s also a time for Americans to reconsider the patterns of American power through our history and consider where they want the pattern to continue as we get ready to elect a new leader into office.

Illustration on the mediocre U.S. economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

An economy mired in mediocrity

For seven years, President Obama’s economic recovery has been all “faux” and no “go.” The one thing America elected him to do in 2008 — restore the economy — still remains effectively undone as growth continues to be lackluster. It has become clear that when it comes to America’s economy, he takes a uniquely fatalistic approach to its performance.

Related Articles

Syrians struggle to get pillows and blankets distributed at a camp for displaced civilians, in the village of Atmeh, Syria. Other Syrians have escaped the conflict by going to neighboring countries, taxing the ability of those nations and international relief agencies to help them. "In terms of the overall numbers, it is very clear the region is facing a humanitarian disaster that is deepening by the day," said Sharon Waxman, of the International Rescue Committee's Commission on Syrian Refugees. (Associated Press)

Islamic Relief: A humanitarian organization dedicated to saving lives

Over the past twenty years, Muslim organizations have played an increasingly prominent role in the delivery of international humanitarian aid. Their growth has been underpinned by the striking generosity of growing Muslim communities in North America and Europe and by zakat - the religious obligation to give 2.5% of disposable income to charity.

Illustration on Ted Cruz in Iowa by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Predicting Iowa

- The Washington Times

The snowstorm that hit the Washington area last week gave the State Department yet another reason to delay releasing a tranche of embarrassing Hillary Clinton emails, ensnared President Obama's motorcade in the rush-hour disaster that turned half-hour commutes into three-hour nightmares, and revealed how unprepared area governments were to deal with weather they knew full well was on its way.

Illustration contrasting storm gallantry and leftist government dependency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sometimes it's a blizzard, but never a snow job

NEW YORK CITY -- It's a strange time to be in a blizzard in the birthplace of "New York values." The wind howls through the canyons of commerce like a wolf at full moon, and for a change the noise is from nature and not from the politicians. The blinding whiteout clears the mind to focus on what's at hand, and what requires a helping hand.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Triumph of Faith: Why the World is More Religious than Ever'

In "The Triumph of Faith: Why the World is More Religious than Ever," Rodney Stark challenges the popular notion that the world is becoming increasingly secular. Marshalling ample facts and figures, Mr. Stark, who serves as distinguished professor of the social sciences at Baylor University, dismantles what "everyone knows" in the "confines of the faculty lounge."

Media right on Trump Liberty flap

Charles Hurt's criticisms of the media coverage of Donald Trump's most recent publicized incident completely miss the point ("Donald Trump's Corinthians misquote overblown by media," Web, Jan. 19). Mr. Hurt expounds on the reasons that conservative evangelicals support Mr. Trump, attributing it to the fact that like Mr. Trump, they are politically incorrect people living in a society that directly opposes or demonizes the ideals for which they stand.

The grim news comes with less than a year left for President Obama to put the Affordable Care Act on firmer footing as he seeks to head off what is likely to be a last effort at repealing the act after November's elections. (Associated Press)

Obama's not-so-hot report card

Not everyone can win a popularity contest, which is why not everybody can be the president. As difficult as winning may be, staying in the good graces of the electorate is even more difficult. Seven years after climbing to the top of the heap, public-opinion has put President Obama in his rightful place: well below average. The judgment of his countrymen can be cruel, but it happens to every president.

For Fox News, Donald Trump's absence could be disastrous. The candidate said his presence has helped the previous debates set records for viewership. "Without me, they'd have no ratings," he said in a Twitter post Tuesday as the feud erupted. (Associated Press)

Will he, or won't he, show up?

Conventional wisdom once held that a front-runner shouldn't debate his challengers because meeting them on the same stage gives them stature. So why do a favor for a challenger? That's why Ronald Reagan wouldn't debate George H.W. Bush in 1980. He sat on his lead, lost to Mr. Bush on caucus night and breathed new life into a challenger who began the race as a footnote in most early polls.

Asked by a reporter about Donald Trump, Russian President Vladimir Putin called him a "standout, talented person, without any doubt." "It is not up to us to assess his qualities," Mr. Putin added, "but he is the absolute leader of the presidential race." (Associated Press)

Russia's provocative nuclear strategy

Russian President Putin has said that the collapse of the Soviet Union was the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the 20th century. He views the West as the culprit and a threat to Moscow's vision of reestablishing Russian dominance over the former lands of the Soviet Union, by force if necessary.

Thew New Liberal Three Stooges Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hollywood's anti-Trump hypocrisy

I'd think it was reverse psychology, except I know they're not that clever. A group of celebrity commissars is organizing against Donald Trump.

Illustration on doing business with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

With Iran it's strictly business

For anyone whose knowledge of history extends beyond the current season of "Keeping Up with the Kardashians" or the latest instant replay of an NFL game, the four days of meetings involving Iran's President Hassan Rouhani, European leaders and businesses should remind people we have seen this show before.

Homecoming: A U.S. government plane met with a Dassault Falcon of the Swiss army air force at Geneva airport in Switzerland to bring back to the U.S. American hostages who were recently freed from lengthy imprisonments in Iran. (Associated Press)

The price of freedom

Freedom is priceless, or used to be. A longstanding American policy decrees that the United States will never negotiate with terrorists, and will never pay ransom for hostages. That rule has been honored in the breach -- never is a long time -- but the rule has never been more enthusiastically abused than during the Obama years.

'Green' agenda hurts West Virginia

The article "West Virginia natural gas production numbers 'shocking'" (Web, Jan. 23) was an interesting read and well-written. These production numbers for oil and natural gas are a glimmer of good news because with the way the Obama administration is determined to eliminate the use of coal in the United States, oil and natural-gas jobs will become even more important to West Virginia's economy.

FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015, file photo, more than 30 oil drilling rigs are idle in a Helmerich & Payne, Inc. yard in Odessa, Texas, along Highway 80, as rig counts drop in the Permian Basin. The price of oil continues to fall, extending a slide that has already gone further and lasted longer than most thought, and probing depths not seen since 2003. Lower crude prices are leading to lower prices for gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and heating oil, giving drivers, shippers, and many businesses a big break on fuel costs. But layoffs across the oil industry are mounting, and bankruptcies among oil companies are expected to soar. (Courtney Sacco/Odessa American via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

A new energy 'crisis'

Big Oil, particularly in the Middle East, never had it so good, and now some of the sheiks sound like they've never had it so bad. A gallon of Perrier, Poland Spring or Mountain Valley Water costs more than a gallon of crude, and Big Oil ain't seen nothin' yet. The shale revolution continues to shake up old assumptions and change things as revolutions always do.