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Milo Yiannopoulos      Associated Press photo

An expensive lesson for conservatives

- The Washington Times

The more the culture bounds out of control, the more the wary have to take care with the company they keep. This applies to media that will print anything in pursuit of “clicks” and “hits,” and to well-meaning organizations about whom they invite to tutor their true believers.

No deal for a two-state solution

“The president is committed to peace. That’s as far as I want to go on that,” said President Trump’s press secretary, Sean Spicer, on Feb. 3 in answer to a reporter’s inquiry regarding the Trump administration’s position on the “two-state solution” for peace between the Palestinians and Israelis. Will Mr. Trump push the two-state paradigm, like George W. Bush and Barack Obama before him, or will the White House realize that this idea is a dangerous fantasy like the irrational Iran nuclear deal?

Retirement Planning Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing for the long term

Ordinary investors can’t be blamed for hesitancy about stocks with market indexes trading near record levels and President Trump’s radical, sometimes quixotic ideas creating so much uncertainty. Yet patience and a diversified portfolio remain the best long-term investment strategy.

FILE - This 2015 file photo provided by the Bloomington Normal Airport Authority shows a damaged wing of a Cirrus SR22 single-engine plane at the Central Illinois Regional Airport in Bloomington, Ill. Once seen as a luxury of the corporate world, private planes are becoming increasingly common at U.S. colleges and universities as schools try to attract athletes, raise money and reward coaches with jet-set vacations. Iowa State University President Steven Leath, a pilot, acknowledged last year that he used a school plane for trips that mixed personal and university business, a practice that came to light after he damaged the aircraft in a hard landing. (Bloomington Normal Airport Authority via AP, File)

TripAdvisor’s Stockholm Syndrome

Despite producing huge amounts of value for society, businesses are among the most vilified institutions in America.

Illustration on the drawbacks of Obamacare risk pools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to lower Obamacare premiums

The Affordable Care Act is in a “death spiral,” warns Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini. Premiums have doubled since the end of 2013, and yet insurers are rapidly exiting the individual market, leaving consumers in many parts of the nation at risk of having no coverage.

Illustration on plans to defeat radical Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating radical Islam

Who is the enemy? It’s been over 15 years since Sept. 11, 2001, and this fundamental question still rattles around. Prominent answers have included evildoers, violent extremists, terrorists, Muslims, and Islamists.

Congressman Matt Cartwright speaks during a rally held at the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Congress must stop death by decree

At the first meeting of the Trump Leadership Council — an advisory group consisting of top CEOs from major companies — President Donald Trump asked these business leaders what was their biggest problem. I expected the answer to be America’s anti-growth tax system.

Increasing Cyber Vandalism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cyberhacking to come

If you thought the 2016 presidential election was an orgy of cyber hacking of Hillary Clinton’s private email server, of the Democratic Party computers being trawled through, and of fake news stories about Donald Trump’s hijinks in Russia, you are right. But you ain’t seen nothing yet.

Illustration on choice in health care by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

How the market can fix health care

Republicans agree that Obamacare has failed and must be repealed. But they can’t agree on the replacement “plan.”

Illustration on economic and technological ties between America and Israel by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The U.S.-Israel economic bond

Much of the talk around President Trump’s meeting this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House surrounds the political and security relationship between the two countries. That is important. But it is only part of the story. Despite having a tiny population of eight million people, Israel is playing a crucial role in helping to power the U.S. economy for the next generation.

California Claim Jumpers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why California’s mining ban is against the law

If you ask a rural Westerner how he feels about federal lands, the response will likely contain plenty of four-letter words. For decades, decisions made by faraway bureaucrats to restrict the productive uses of these lands have significantly affected nearby property owners and local economies, creating a constant source of conflict.

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Russia conundrum

Donald Trump’s presidency is in deep trouble. After nearly four weeks in office, he has yet to finish filling his administration’s top posts, and Congress is about to conduct an investigation into his ties to Russia.

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American Sattelite Technology Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Aerospace sector can make America great again

SpaceX just launched 10 Iridium Communications satellites into low-Earth orbit. These satellites will beam phone and data service to tens of thousands of Americans who live or work in areas too remote for regular cellphone coverage.

Ain't seen nothing yet

President Trump's defensive action is mild compared to what Israel does to protect its citizens ("Former U.S. officials: Trump travel ban could endanger troops, 'do long-term damage,'" Web, Feb. 6).

President Donald Trump, center, waves to military service members after arriving on Air Force One at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., on Monday, Feb. 6, 2017. (Octavio Jones/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Resisting the 'resistance'

The drums of conflict grow louder by the day. Never-Trump demonstrators and their rioting factions are mustering their forces to mortally wound Donald Trump's presidency before it gains further momentum. The battle is broader than opposition to an unconventional chief executive.

President Donald Trump salutes a Marines honor guard as he disembarks from Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

A time to chill

The spirit of Rodney Dangerfield no longer stands alone. The comedian who complained that "I don't get no respect" now speaks for just about everybody. In modern America, "nobody gets no respect."

Free speech for all, not just some

Having taught at the University of California, Berkeley many years ago, I know exactly where last Tuesday's riots occurred, as I crossed Sproul Plaza regularly ("Trump floats cutting off federal funds after Berkeley riots," Web, Feb. 2). Further, as a very, very old-fashioned liberal, I believe that the true heart of a high-quality liberal arts education is exposure to and engagement with a wide variety of ideas covering all points of view.

Marine Le Pen (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Exporting the example of the new American revolution

- The Washington Times

The voice of the chicken, like the voice of the turtle, is heard in the land and it's making a fearsome racket, on final approach to the roost. The established order has been turned upside down in a flutter of fine feathers. The unmentionables and the deplorables are suddenly at the village gates.

Revisionist History of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Remembering the Holocaust, forgetting the Jews, again

There was something familiar about the Trump White House's statement marking International Day in Commemoration of Victims of the Holocaust on Jan. 27. And something odd about news media coverage and remonstrances following it.

President Donald Trump salutes a Marines honor guard as he disembarks from Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017 from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

'Be careful what you wish for'

At the National Prayer Breakfast last week, President Trump promised to "totally destroy" the so-called Johnson Amendment, a law that prohibits churches from endorsing or opposing political candidates at the risk of losing their tax-exempt status.

Illustration on the value of the dollar and its alternatives by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Private money-like products gain traction amid mistrust of government

We all think we know what money is, but economists have many different definitions of money (e.g., M1, M2, M4, and others) -- and the problem is getting worse. Is the U.S. paper dollar you have in your wallet money? How about a one-ounce gold $50 coin minted by the U.S. government, which has a current market value of roughly $1,200? Or digital "bitcoins" in your computer?

Illustration on infrastructure construction and environmental regulations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Cutting the red tape on infrastructure spending

President Trump's plan to accelerate improvements to America's infrastructure requires that the nation reform a "root cause" of delay in the implementation of public and private projects: Federal wetland regulation based on Section 404 of the Clean Water Act.

The Van Gogh that, perhaps, we didn't know

We occasionally hear about the discovery of a previously unknown artifact, such as a painting or musical composition. This revelation tends to lead to vigorous debates, disagreements and denials from experts in a particular field.

FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2017 file picture President of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi , is on his way to a news conference after a meeting of the governing council in Frankfurt, Germany.   The head of the European Central Bank says  Monday Feb. 6, 2017 that its monetary stimulus efforts are still very much needed to support the continent's economic recovery  despite the recent spike in inflation in the countries that use the euro currency. (AP Photo/Michael Probst,file)

Overregulation drags down business

"If I could paraphrase a well-known statement by Will Rogers that he never met a man he didn't like," President Reagan once quipped, "I'm afraid we have some people around here who never met a tax they didn't like."

The Succession of California Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

California dreamin' of secession

Golden State progressives have finally escaped the time loop of Groundhog Day, and conservatives should rejoice.