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Meaningful Tax Cut Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rand Paul’s ‘fair and flat’ tax proposal

Sen. Rand Paul’s flat tax plan is like a decent song in a world full of off-key voices. It hits all the right notes, including greater simplicity, lower rates for everyone, and a more competitive system of corporate taxation. But it has some small details that could use fine tuning.

Sen. Bernard Sanders, a Vermont independent who caucuses with the Democrats, is focusing on wealth disparity.

Bernie’s surge

If you Google Bernie Sanders, some surprising poll numbers will appear, showing the rumpled, self-described socialist gaining fast on Hillary Clinton in the race for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination.

Illustration on the shifting meaning of marriage in modern society by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The same-sex factor in ‘freedom from marriage’

Ross Douthat of The New York Times produced what is perhaps the most penetrating piece on the Supreme Court’s ruling last week on gay marriage. He notes that, long before the debate on that subject gained traction in U.S. politics, gay intellectuals carried on their own debate about marriage and how the gay community should view that venerable human institution.

Illustration on the imposition of Common Core on U.S. schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ending Washington’s mandate on Common Core

The United States Senate will soon begin debate on a bill to get the federal government out of our local classrooms by permanently ending Washington’s mandate on Common Core.

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Shutter the Ex-Im Bank—for good

Reauthorizing Ex-Im would be a step backwards at the time when our economy needs to move forward.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia gives the keynote speech at the Snake River Adjudication celebration dinner at the Boise Center on the Grove in Boise, Idaho, on Monday, August 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger)

Why gays ‘can’t get no satisfaction’

- The Washington Times

You might think the gays, the liberals and the mellowed-out folks who groove on kittens and little living things would be content to lie in a patch of sunlight in the corner and purr together.

Illustration on connections between Rolling Stone's reporter and the Departmwent of Education in the UVA "rape" case by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Education Department’s Rolling Stone reckoning

When one journalist (Chuck Ross of The Daily Caller) made a Freedom of Information Act request of the U.S. Department of Education about possible involvement of federal officials in the now-discredited Rolling Stone story, “A Rape on Campus,” the department sent him a box with a CD in it.

Illustration on Iran's "North Korean strategy" for developing nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys

It’s North Korea, all over again

We’ve seen this before. President Obama’s Iran nuclear deal looks increasingly like the disastrous deal the United States struck with the regime in North Korea. In 1994, the U.S. government signed a nuclear deal with North Korea that, according to then-President Clinton, would “make the United States, the Korean Peninsula and the world safer.” The agreement, we were told, did “not rely on trust,” but instead would involve a verification program that would stop the North Koreans from ever acquiring a nuclear bomb. Sound familiar?

Illustration on the value of the U.S. Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘We the People’

“We the People.” We’ve heard that phrase so often it’s easy to overlook its significance. But as we mark our nation’s birthday, we should take a moment to ask ourselves: What is the role of the people?

The Washington Times. (Note: Ex-Im Bank does not directly finance military exports.)

Shut down the Export-Import Bank

Closing down the Ex-Im Bank is an important first step in the battle against the unhealthy marriage between the government and corporate America.

Hillary Clinton spins her wheels

You don’t need to be in New York City to notice the Hillary Clown Car is rolling along at full speed. It would, however, be dangerous to underestimate Hillary Clinton, the Democrats’ likely nominee for the 2016 presidential contest, but as I’ve noted several times on Fox News, we are reminded time and again how this woman lost to an unknown, inexperienced lawyer from Chicago in 2008.

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 29, 2015

Good roads shouldn’t cost more money

It’s summertime, and that means millions of Americans cramming in their minivans and crisscrossing around the country on family vacation. But how safe are the roads, and will they be backed up for miles of gridlock?

Illustration on medicinal marijuana by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

The curative side of cannabis

Imagine the following scenario: You have a son or daughter who suffers from epilepsy. Seizures wrack your child’s body every day. Some days, he or she endures a dozen or more seizures. The condition prevents your child from going to school, from eating normally, from having friends. It also exacts a toll on you and your family. You cannot leave your child alone for any extended period of time, and certain activities, such as sports games, road trips or visits to the movie theater, are off limits.

Related Articles

Dividing the Euro Into Three Currencies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to save the euro

Writing in 1776, the year of the Declaration of Independence, Adam Smith explained how "The Wealth of Nations" depended on breaking free from the monopoly power of vested interests and letting free markets dictate commerce, and how this was key to America's growth at that time. Restoring the wealth of Europe today requires the same approach. Moreover, a strong economy is essential to give European countries the confidence and resources to play their part in NATO and stand up to an expansionist Russia and Iran.

Illustration on China's cyber raids on the U.S. by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

China's big hack attack

Upon hearing of the massive data breach of employee information from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) -- allegedly by hackers working for the Chinese government -- Kay Coles James, the former director of OPM under George W. Bush, told me she was "aghast," adding, "I can't think about the national security implications of a foreign government knowing every single federal employee, where they work, where they live, all of their significant data. Think about what that information can do in the hands of people who want to do us harm."

Why the vice presidential pick matters

Conservative voters and Republican strategists are grossly overlooking the vital importance of the vice presidential pick in terms of winning the next U.S. presidential election. We all know that presidential candidates are now more of an entertainment, inducement, and campaign-speaking-skill popularity contest, yet they may come with a powerful, strong, and experienced VP sharing the helm.

Syrian migrants who have been stranded for days, in the northeastern Greek island of Lesvos, stand in queue as they wait for travel documents from Greek authorities at the port of Mytilene on Monday, June 15, 2015. An emergency European Union plan to help Italy and Greece manage thousands of migrants crossing the Mediterranean could be vastly watered down on Tuesday, according EU diplomats. During the first five months of 2015, 40,297 migrants arrived in Greece, up from 6,500 in the same period in 2014. Almost all of them have crossed in boats from Turkey. The sign reads ''Passenger Terminal of Mytilene.'' (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

The 'new' Middle East

Old alliances and barriers have fallen away in the Middle East in the wake of new waves of "traditional" Islamic terrorism and the withdrawal of American leadership. "Traditional" is the right word, because, despite politically correct commentaries to the contrary, the history of the spread of Islam has always been accompanied, if not led, by violence. Nobody called Muhammad "the Prince of Peace."

In this image made available by the American Red Cross in London on Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2010, shows earthquake damage to a shanty town on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, following a major earthquake in Haiti, on Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2010. (AP Photo/American Red Cross, Matt Marek)

Drowning the fish

American generosity is the marvel of the world. The open heart, accompanied by the open pocketbook, is the American way to relieve the pain and loss of disaster. It's how a wealthy society can spread largesse to those struggling with survival.

Regulations Create Alternative Currencies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Damming up the dollars

If enough people have a demand for a particular product, whether it is prostitution, gambling, drugs and alcohol, or an anonymous, instantaneous and low-cost money transfer, it will be supplied. Poorly thought out regulation or prohibition raises the cost of any product, which causes innovative people to think of ways to get around the bans or regulations -- while, at the same time, fostering criminality and corruption. And both users and suppliers of the banned or overregulated product lose their respect for the law because they are deemed to be criminals.

Hillary Rodham Clinton    Associated Press

Blues for a first lady

- The Washington Times

Nobody likes to hear himself ridiculed, criticized, scolded or even mildly rebuked, especially when he deserves it. It's part of being human. Politicians, who come with outsized egos, like it less than others.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to supporters during a rally, Sunday, June 14, 2015, in Des Moines, Iowa. Seeking an army of volunteers, Clinton is trying to build an organizational edge in Iowa as some of her lesser-known Democratic rivals clamor for attention in the state that tripped up her first presidential campaign. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

And so it begins: Political reporter barred from Hillary Clinton campaign event

- The Washington Times

In an age where official transparency is valued by both press and the public, The Daily Mail reports that David Martosko, the U.S. political for the British news organization, was denied access to a campaign event for Hillary Clinton in New Hampshire on Monday morning - despite the fact he had been designated as the "pool reporter" for the day.

Marines of the 1st Force Service Supply Group Forward respond to reports of an Iraqi force preparing to advance on them from the south during a sandstorm in southern Iraq on March 25, 2003. President Bush's legacy depends on a positive outcome in Iraq. (J.M. Eddins Jr./The Washington Times)

Gallup poll: Americans now less likely to think the war in Iraq was a 'mistake'

- The Washington Times

Americans have lived with the Iraq and Afghanistan wars for 12 years, essentially, and their perceptions of the conflicts are shifting. "Amid a security situation in Iraq and Afghanistan that continues to be contentious, a smaller share of Americans now than last year view the conflict in Afghanistan or the Iraq war as a mistake," says a new Gallup poll analysis.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to supporters during a rally, Sunday, June 14, 2015, in Des Moines, Iowa. Clinton's campaign has signaled Iowa will be the centerpiece of its ground game. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Hillary's favor machine

Ideologies and proclivities that end in "ism" bloom and fade in Washington like the cherry blossoms at the Tidal Basin in spring, but cronyism persists through all seasons and ages. Some practice it to greater effect than others, but the Clintons have perfected the fine art of back-scratching for political advantage and profit. New revelations have surfaced that Hillary was doling out favors far earlier than previously known. It simply confirms what the public already knows about America's quintessential political family: If there is a seam in legal lexicon as narrow as the word "is," the Clintons will find it and turn it into a broad boulevard of personal gain.

No free market in the fueling sector

The free market will not move America forward because there is no free market present in the fueling sector ("Congress should red-line 'green' gas rules of the EPA," Web, June 1). The oil industry has a monopoly on the pump — and therefore you, the consumer.

President Barack Obama speaks to the Catholic Hospital Association Conference at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, Tuesday, June 9, 2015. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) ** FILE **

Dribbling and drabbling toward defeat

There is almost a childlike innocence to the foreign policy initiatives of the Obama administration. These might be admired for their insouciance, were it not for the fact that they are contributing to worldwide instability and promising even greater disaster for the United States.

South China Sea map to accompany Lyons article of June 15, 2015

Checking China's military build-up in the South China Sea

China intends to ignore the Obama administration's demand that it halt its military base-building in the South China Sea. It is time for Washington to face a new reality: Either it leads the way to a new "armed peace" in this region, or China will soon commence a war for domination.

An artistic interpretation of King John's signing the Magna Carta before English barons at Runnymede in 1215

Magna Carta's first 800 years

In interpreting the law, context is everything and it is nothing. Today is the 800th anniversary of the most famous law in the English-speaking world, known as Magna Carta (Latin for 'Great Charter').

Treaty Withdrawals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Solving the crisis in U.S.-Russia relations

It is unrealistic at the moment to expect a speedy improvement of U.S.-Russia relations. This is regrettable, but it is a fact: The relations between the two countries today may be even worse than during Soviet times -- a really disturbing development.

Illustration on growing government's constricting effects on the economy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When government bursts its restraints

America has reversed direction from its origin of limited government and unlimited economy. Today, America is increasingly defined by an expanding government and a retreating economy. The question now is: When we will recognize this reversal?