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Vice President Mike Pence, left, greets President Donald Trump as he steps off Air Force One as he arrives Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Laying waste to the party of Lincoln and Reagan

Isn’t it time the president stage an intervention to save Congress from itself? As leader of the Republican Party, the president has every right, even a duty, to intervene when it becomes clear his own party leadership is not only obstructing the will of the people, but is doing damage to the country.

Replacing patriotism with tribalism

Just after last week’s terrorist attack in Barcelona, a pro-Islamic State website posted video from the scene along with a message in Arabic saying, “Terror is filling the hearts of the Crusader in the Land of Andalusia.”

Trump's Baloney Detector Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s baloney detector annoys his critics

President Trump is in trouble again with his moral superiors. His problem, of course, is that he cannot throttle his baloney detector. Mr. Trump, it seems, at some point in life acquired a baloney detector that has usually served him well. It certainly served him well during his long years in business and during his brief time in politics. Now, however, it is problematic.

Incentive to Save Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Living with low interest rates

No matter what President Trump and Congress do about taxes and the like, low interest rates are becoming as certain as aging. That’s good news for young folks buying homes but tough on retirees who rely on CDs and bonds, and people over 55 realigning portfolios for retirement.

Iran Turkey Rivalry Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran versus Turkey, again

News that Iran’s and Turkey’s governments reached an accord on Idlib, a Syrian town now the focus of American interests, brings relations between the two of the largest and most influential states in the Middle East momentarily out of the shadows.

Women have a tea as workers march towards Plaza de Mayo, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017. Thousands of union workers marched against the economic policies of President Mauricio Macri. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)

Time for organized labor to end forced dues

Given the heated rhetoric that surrounds the right to work, you might believe that the concept threatens the very existence of unions. However, as a former union president I can assure you that the ability to collect fees from people who don’t want to join the union is not only unnecessary, but that ultimately it undermines union officials’ legitimacy when speaking for voluntary members.

Illustration comparing Trump's administration with Clinton's by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Not the first wounded presidency

Liberals predicting Donald Trump’s impending political demise should recall one of their own: Bill Clinton. Mr. Clinton already plumbed President Trump’s worst-case scenarios and survived. Even congressional Republicans, for whom a “Clinton reprise” is a bigger threat, have less to fear than liberals would like to believe.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gives a speech at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, Thursday, May 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) ** FILE **

Madness! Even the giraffes have gone crazy

- The Washington Times

We owe Chicken Little an apology. Maybe the sky really is falling. Evidence is everywhere. Cries and whimpers suddenly grow deafening as the landscape is dusted with snowflakes, who imagine they’re unique and have in common with other snowflakes only an extremely low melting point.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Aug. 22, 2017.

The price-level dilemma

Is more inflation desirable? Those at the Federal Reserve seem to think so, and they have explicitly said their target is 2 percent, or about double the current level.

Illustration on removing Confederate statues and monuments by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Historical hysteria

We will learn even less from history if we wipe it clean, as some are trying to do by removing statues of Confederate leaders whose beliefs about slavery and race most, including me, find offensive. Conversation beats censorship.

Illustration on anarchist and totalitarian strains in the leftist Antifa movement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Old hatreds made new

Amid the chaos of Charlottesville, two specters from the previous century’s darkest hours have re-emerged. Alongside the well-publicized Nazi symbols on full display during the “Unite the Right” rally, so too were Communist hammers and sickles brandished by the opposing anti-fascist or “Antifa” protesters.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forgetting McConnell’s greatest achievement

Mitch McConnell has been taking quite a beating from President Trump for failing to get a health care reform bill through the Senate, but even Mr. Trump has largely conceded that John McCain, alone blew up the majority leader’s painstakingly crafted compromise.

Presidential Courage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

North Korea and fear

At the heart of the Cold War, the ever-present nuclear threat had a profound effect on the American psyche. Children hiding under desks during air raid drills during the 1960s and 1970s had longer-term implications in terms of mental and physical health as studies in the 1980s revealed.

Union Vote Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Union workers celebrate right-to-work laws

As summer temperatures continue in the 90s, August beachgoers aren’t the only ones feeling the heat. In Missouri, union employees are getting burned by efforts to block implementation of right-to-work.

Related Articles

Use social media, but with caution

"Young job hopefuls not hiding their social media past, survey finds" (Web, Aug. 9) claims that young people seeking employment no longer believe their social media will negatively affect job opportunities. As a young person in the job market, I would say this is true, but with hard exceptions.

Statue not an immigrant beacon

In "Not everyone can join the American nation" (Web, Aug. 8) Clifford May argues that CNN's Jim Acosta was wrong to say that Emma Lazarus' poem, "The New Colossus," inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, set a U.S. policy of admitting immigrants considered the "wretched refuse" of foreign lands. Mr. May argues on prudential grounds, but there is a historical argument, too.

Participants carry an American flag during the 4th of July parade in Santa Monica, Calif. on Tuesday, July 4, 2017. Decked out in red, white and blue, Californians waved flags and sang patriotic songs at Independence Day parades across the state. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

We are America

- The Washington Times

The hand-wringers were out in full force this past week, moaning and wailing about President Donald Trump's rhetoric regarding North Korea. But why? We are America. We don't bow down; we don't quiver in fear.

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster listens as President Donald Trump speaks to reporters after a security briefing at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

H.R. McMaster foes slammed as 'Islamophobes,' 'white supremacists'

- The Washington Times

H.R. McMaster, President Trump's choice of national security adviser, has what some say is a shady record of defense of Israel -- and what others outright label as subversive to America's interests. Now, the Council on American Islamic Relations jumped to McMaster's defense. But that alone is a red flag. Having CAIR as a friend isn't exactly exonerating.

This Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, file photo shows hydrocodone pills, also known as Vicodin, arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. Leftover opioids are a common dilemma for surgery patients; a study published Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, suggests that after several common operations most don't use all their pills and many store the remainders unsafely at home. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot) ** FILE **

Opioids: In defense of the pain pills

- The Washington Times

If you've never experienced chronic pain, or been around someone with a pain that just won't end, it's easy to dismiss opioids as evil and to make grand calls for their prescription restriction, or even outright bans.

Dianne Feinstein rips Trump as 'cruel' for deporting illegals

- The Washington Times

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, on the heels of a deportation that led to a separated family, issued a scathing statement against President Donald Trump, suggesting his border controls were beyond what's necessary for national security. She also called him really, really mean, and that she might tell his mother on him if he doesn't cut it out.

BOOK REVIEW: Three Minutes to Doomsday

Conrad, Ramsey and others in this spy ring gave the Soviets American's defensive war plans, nuclear launch codes and other military secrets. It was a devastating breach of security.

FILE - In this July 4, 2017, file photo, a U.S. missile defense system called Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, is seen at a golf course in Seongju, South Korea. North Korea claims it is in the final stages of preparing a plan to launch four intermediate-range ballistic missiles over Japan and into waters just off the island of Guam, where about 7,000 U.S. troops are based. The U.S. has pumped billions of dollars into its missile defense systems and sold hundreds of millions of dollars' worth to its allies, including the very controversial deployment of a state-of-the-art system known by its acronym, THAAD, in South Korea. (Kim Jun-beom/Yonhap via AP, File)

The South Pacific's strategic role

With the growing threat of long-range ballistic missile launches from North Korea, a new front has opened up in the Pacific's strategic framework: The South Pacific.

Illustration on Trump and the TPP by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump can learn from Barack Obama's TPP mistakes

During the 2016 campaign, Donald Trump bucked party orthodoxy on the left and the right, promising to withdraw from the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) and re-negotiate America's "horrible trade deals," including the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The president's pledge to stand up for American workers and businesses helped cement the election, moving voters in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Ohio and flipping those states red.

Illustration on diffusing conflict with Qatar by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Bringing Qatar back from open conflict with its brothers

The dispute between Qatar and its Arab neighbors hurts everyone involved. Qatar had agreed to cooperate with the other governments including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. Instead, they are involved in a boycott that verges on open warfare.

Getting students safely to and from school is a top priority. The AAA School Safety Patrol Program helps ensure that kids can do that. Ushers lead kids across intersections. (AAA)

School safety patrols: Priority No. 1

- The Washington Times

When it comes to education, it should go without saying that teaching and learning are the top priorities inside schoolhouses. Getting students safely to and fro, then, is Priority No. 1.

Former National Security Adviser Susan E. Rice's checkered history continues to haunt her in the post-Obama era. (Associated Press)

Susan Rice's ridiculous North Korea recommendation to Trump

- The Washington Times

Susan Rice offered up some recommendations to President Trump, on his dealings with North Korea, that went pretty much like this: Do nothing. Her advice, by way of an opinion piece in the New York Times, is titled, "It's Not Too Late on North Korea." A better title, though, is this: "Why America's So Happy Barack Obama's Gone."