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This Sept. 5, 2014, photo by New York Times photographer Daniel Berehulak, part of a winning series,  shows James Dorbor, 8, suspected of being infected with Ebola, being carried by medical staff to an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. The boy, who was brought in by his father, lay outside the center for at least six hours before being seen.  Berehulak is the winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography, announced Monday, April 20, 2015, at Columbia University in New York. (Daniel Berehulak, New York Times, Columbia University via AP)

A little good news about Ebola

- The Washington Times

The news from Africa and the Third World is seldom good, and much of the bad news is about disease born of ignorance, superstition and primitive sanitation, news dispatched by a media addicted to tales of unrelieved gloom, certain doom and inevitable disaster.

Unions Helped by Obama Appointees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping workers in the dark

Two of Sen. Harry Reid’s controversial legislative maneuvers are coming back to haunt American workers. In 2013, then-Majority Leader Reid’s threat to eviscerate the judicial filibuster cowed enough Senate Republicans to approve Big Labor’s handpicked candidates to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). A few months later, Mr. Reid acted on his threat to gut the filibuster and installed three of President Obama’s nominees on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Missing world leader by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the JV team of world leaders

British Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent stunning victory for his Conservative party catapulted him to one of the three top Western world leaders, alongside Germany’s Angela Merkel and France’s Francois Hollande. Mr. Cameron wasn’t supposed to win for numerous reasons, not the least of which because of his austerity policies and vigorous opposition from Labor and Liberal parties that thought a bigger government was the key to Britain’s growth.

Illustration on missing Muldovan bank funds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Who took Moldova’s millions — the crooks or the Kremlin?

On the eve of a national election in tiny Moldova last November, $450 million — equal to 10 percent of the Eastern European country’s entire annual gross domestic product — went missing. So far, no one knows where it went.

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Chamber of Corporate Welfare

Here’s a half-serious question: How much do taxpayers have to pay off Boeing to make the Export-Import Bank — finally and irrevocably — go away? If the feds wrote a check to Boeing for $100 million, would they then let the Ex-Im Bank die a merciful and long overdue death?

Illustration on the abuse of citizens' rights under current government surveillance laws by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A better Patriot Act

Critical parts of the USA Patriot Act are about to expire. The reauthorization bill moving through Congress, the USA Freedom Act, has sparked controversy on both sides of the political aisle and within the civil-libertarian community, rekindling debates that began more than a decade ago. Now is the chance to implement much-needed reforms, including reforms to a provision not expiring: the one authorizing National Security Letters (NSL).

Paying heed to the walking wounded

A few days ago I received a thank you note from an American soldier who has been struggling with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As with many victims of TBI and PTSD, it had taken him a while to realize the true nature of his injury and to seek professional help.

White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, shown in this video image, says during his Feb. 3, 1999, deposition that President Clinton lied to him. The videotape was part of House Manager Rep. James Rogan's, D-Calif., presentation in the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton, Saturday, Feb. 6, 1999, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

Flying as close to the flame as Hillary dares

- The Washington Times

Everything about the Clintons, both Hillary and Bubba, is a lie, including (to steal a memorable line from the author Mary McCarthy) the “a,” the “and,” and the “the.” Neither Bubba nor Hillary know how to tell the truth, but both of them are masters at spinning the lie.

Bloody Hand of ISIS in the Mideast Illustration by M Ryder

ISIS attacks on the West

The May 3 assault on a Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas, prompted much discussion about the assailants’ connections to the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, ISIL and Daesh. Did ISIS run them as agents? Are they part of a new network of terror in the West?

Illustration about the abuse of Sixth Amendment rights in misdemeanor cases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Shining a light on 10 million criminal prosecutions

Adding to the growing momentum in Congress for bipartisan criminal justice reform, last week the Senate Judiciary Committee held a first-of-its-kind hearing to shine much-needed light on pervasive — and largely unexamined — problems in the largest segment of our criminal justice system. Republican Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa heard expert testimony describing widespread violations around the country of the Sixth Amendment right to legal counsel for Americans charged with misdemeanors.

Bringing Children into the World Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Are embryos persons or property?

Much of the media has ridiculed businessman Nick Loeb, the former fiance of actress Sofia Vergara, the star of the sitcom “Modern Family,” because he filed a lawsuit to prevent Ms. Vergara from destroying the frozen embryos they created together in 2013. But many in the pro-life community have rallied behind him, viewing the embryos that were created by Mr. Loeb and Ms. Vergara as persons deserving protection by the state.

**FILE** The sign for the National Labor Relations Board is seen outside the organization's headquarters in downtown Washington on July 17, 2013. (Associated Press)

Labor board overreach

Last month, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), stacked with Democratic appointees loyal to Big Labor, enacted new procedures to govern unionization elections.

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The timid defense of free speech

- The Washington Times

Some of our liberal friends, particularly the art lovers among them, are terrified of the hobgoblins that Ralph Waldo Emerson warned about. "A foolish consistency," he famously said, "is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen, philosophers and divines."

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei took issues with key points on the framework of a nuclear deal including sanction relief and inspector access. (Associated Press)

The hangmen of Iran

Hanging is a particularly gruesome method of dispatching the wicked and the addicted, largely abandoned by the civilized world, though it's true that electric chairs, gas chambers, poisoned hypodermic needles and even firing squads are hardly more civilized.

Illustration on the renewal of Gdansk, Poland by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An economic renewal built on optimism

Gdansk, Poland -- Over the past 1,000 years, this city on the Baltic has gone through cycles of great prosperity and almost total destruction. This is the city where World War II began 76 years ago on Sept. 1, 1939. And this is the city where the fall of European communism began in 1980.

The unlikely friendship of two '60s titans

This is how Kevin Schultz, a history professor at the University of Illinois in Chicago, introduces his history of the '60s: "It was late fall, and the old man awoke in a sour mood. As he rolled out of bed, he saw the cold November winds outside . Compounding the changing weather, he was also sick and dying."

Illustration on the Conservative victory in the aftermath of Britain's 2015 elections by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Britain's surprising Conservatives

BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- "Shocked," "surprised," "stunned" were some of the words used by broadcasters, columnists, political "experts" and pollsters when a Conservative Party victory was forecast by exit polls on election night.

An airbag system and active head restraints are standard.

Ruled by rules

Say you got a recall notice for your car. You'd naturally be alarmed, especially after reading that the problem involved Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 208 -- "Occupant Crash Protection."

A drone carrying the flag of South Vietnam flies above during a commemoration for the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, at Sid Goldstein Freedom Park in Westminster, Calif., on Thursday, April 30, 2015. (Matt Masin/The Orange County Register via AP)   MAGS OUT; LOS ANGELES TIMES OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

A story of the Vietnam War

The Pentagon is out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the end of the war in Vietnam, which invites new recriminations and the false story of what happened in Vietnam. There's already a bitter struggle over what to "celebrate" and how to do it.

Illustration on strategies to spread Western culture to the Islamic world by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Girding for the long haul of terror

Two seemingly unconnected recent events but in reality intimately connected are sure signs that the war on terrorism is being lost.

Taiwan should be party to TPP

There are many good reasons for President Obama to scold Democrats on their trade-pact stance, but the president has yet to convince lawmakers that a regional free-trade agreement without Taiwan would be unthinkable ("Liberal opposition mounts to free-trade deal," 2, May 8). If this regional system is going to cover all 50-plus countries around the Pacific Rim, the absence of Taiwan will render the regional integration disadvantageous to American interests.

Yale University students wear a variety of head coverings during Class Day at Yale in New Haven (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

Conservatives not welcome: Liberal speakers dominate college commencements by six-to-one

- The Washington Times

Conservatives are essentially unwelcome on the annual college commencement speaker circuit, when politicians, the famous and infamous don a graduation robe, and interesting hat and make a speech. According to the Young America's Foundation's annual survey of speakers at the nation's top 100 universities, liberal speakers more than dominated the field. Among the top 100 campuses: liberal speakers outnumber conservatives 6-to-1.

Illustration on love, forgiveness and racial harmony by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An invisible thread

A single act of kindness crossed racial, socio-economic, gender and generational lines---and reverberated for decades.

An interview between Bloomberg News managing editor and Sen. Ted Cruz has raised some questions. (Washington Times)

Authenticity challenge: Ted Cruz asked to prove he's 'Cuban' - controversy ensues, apology issued

- The Washington Times

Analysts and journalists are still puzzling over the recent interview between Bloomberg News managing editor Mark Halperin and Sen. Ted Cruz. The Texas Republican and Cuban-American was subjected to a string of inquiries about his taste in Cuban food and music, his ability to speak Spanish and other matters that had no real place in the political discourse.

FBI crime scene investigators document evidence outside the Curtis Culwell Center, Monday, May 4, 2015, in Garland, Texas. Two men opened fire with assault weapons on police Sunday night who were guarding a contest for Muslim Prophet Muhammed cartoons. A police officer returned fire killing both men. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)

Jihadis' demand for self-censorship would spell the end of free expression

Two Islamist terrorists were dead and a police officer wounded in the aftermath of the "Draw Muhammad" cartoon contest in Garland, Texas. Despite what many would like you to think, it wasn't the cartoons presented at this private gathering or the event itself that should concern Americans -- it's the blaming of the victim by many in the media, including some conservative favorites.

"The Dadly Virtues" by Jonathan Last will be on book shelves on May 18. (Templeton Press)

The Dadly Virtues: Conservative journalists gather to show the nation how to father

- The Washington Times

The conservative menfolk are gathering on Monday with much on their minds: their children. The group - prominent journalists, mainly - meet at the American Enterprise Institute in the nation's capital to talk over a forthcoming book on fatherhood. All have contributed to it. The book? That would be "The Dadly Virtues: Adventures from the Worst Job You'll Ever Love" by Jonathan Last, a senior writer at The Weekly Standard. He brings a few of his creative buddies to join him on the podium - P.J. O'Rourke, Jonah Goldberg, Steve Hayes, James Lileks, Tucker Carlson - to name a few. A total of 17 conservative father/journalists contributed to the work.

U.N. peacekeepers media-friendly

"U.N. proves major threat to press freedom" by Drew Johnson (Web, May 3) claims that in September 2014, U.N. Peacekeeping Chief Herve Ladsous prevented reporters from filming a media engagement in Sudan. Writer Drew Johnson also alleges that Mr. Ladsous canceled the briefing when efforts to prevent filming proved ineffective.

Police officers just doing jobs

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has called for a federal investigation into her own police department. This is an obvious attempt to deflect from her sheer incompetence and the bad decisions she made during the recent riots.