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FILE - In this March 18, 2017 file photo, Congressional candidate Rob Quist meets with supporters during the annual Mansfield Metcalf Celebration dinner hosted by the state's Democratic Party in Helena, Montana. He is trying to fire up the party faithful in his race against Republican Greg Gianforte in a May 25 special election to fill Montana's sole congressional seat. (AP Photo/Bobby Caina Calvan, File)

Hiding his socialism beneath a cowboy hat

- The Washington Times

Fresh from special election defeats in Kansas and Georgia, Democratic professionals and activists alike are focusing on the election to fill Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s Montana congressional seat as one more chance to chip away at the Republican majority in the House.

Afghanistan Peace Plan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Afghanistan crisis

The U.S.-led war in Afghanistan has not only continued unabated for over 15 years, making it America’s longest war, but has no end in sight.

In this April 25, 2017 photo provided by ABC 7 Eyewitness News in New York, a wooden hammock lay on the sidewalk in New York. Police say that an tourist from England was injured and taken to the hospital when the hammock fell from the building she was talking near and struck her. Police believe wind may have blown the wooden framed hammock off the building's terrace. (ABC 7 Eyewitness News via AP)

Taking the cuffs off the cops

The Obama Justice Department made a habit of federalizing local police forces by threatening litigation and securing a settlement in the form of a consent decree. That turned out to be an exercise in anti-police bias which, happily, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is now reversing.

Marine Le Pen (Associated Press)

The status quo survives in France, but in ruins

- The Washington Times

The French easily embrace contradiction and chaos. It’s what makes their politics work: “Plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose,” and they said it first: “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” The Sunday national election in France proved it again.

Unrest in Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Venezuela’s coming civil war

- The Washington Times

As American public attention has been focusing on terror attacks in Paris, the crisis in Syria and the nuclear-armed lunatic running North Korea, Venezuela to our south is about to explode into violence and civil war with incalculable consequences in our own hemisphere.

Ivanka Trump, listens as her father President Donald Trump, talks via a video conference to astronauts on the International Space Station, Monday, April 24, 2017, from the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

100 days of the GOP eating its own

- The Washington Times

It’s rounding on 100 days of the President Donald Trump administration — and surprise, surprise, it’s not just Democrats who are pointing wild fingers at the White House for this and that, for what have you and what not. criticizing, condemning and generally crying about how things are progressing. It’s Republicans, almost as much.

Illustration on the consequences of questioning current conventional wisdom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shut up and go away

Columbia University, from which I have a degree, has set aside rooms where straight white males — like me — are told they are unwelcome. How should I respond to their annual fund drives?

Illustration on the recent Paris terror attack and the French national elections by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The police vs. the PC police

As is almost always the case, signs of trouble preceded the latest shooting in Paris, which left one police officer dead and wounded two bystanders before police killed the gunman, later identified as French national Karim Cheurfi, a known criminal with a long, violent record. ISIS claimed to be behind the attack. According to police, a note praising ISIS fell out of Cheurfi’s pocket when he fell.

Better-educated Immigrants Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

One-upping Donald Trump’s crackdown on immigration

President Trump’s crackdown on immigrants committing crimes and employers abusing H-1B visas to replace qualified Americans with low-wage foreign workers may be welcome. However, those fall far short of the comprehensive reform needed to better align immigration policy with the needs of the country.

FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Antonio Reyes of Brownsville, Texas, stands by the U.S.-Mexico border fence near his home. Reyes said he's seen people scale the border fence that bisects his backyard and jump down in seconds. Sometimes they carry bales of what appear to be drugs. A higher wall is "still not going to stop them," he said. "They'll shotput it or whatever they have to do." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)

Protecting our southern border with U.S. mariners

As chairman of the Coast Guard and Maritime Subcommittee in the House of Representatives, I am proud to be an unwavering defender of the Jones Act — a critical U.S. national security law that requires vessels moving from one U.S. port to another must be U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed.

Illustration on CUFI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A boost for U.S.-Israeli ties

“An unidentified guest uses a Trump Hotel branded umbrella as she walks into the West Wing of the White House,” read the caption of an Associated Press photo in the Washington Examiner picturing an attractive young woman whose face is becoming increasingly familiar in Washington political circles.

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Spicer Hitler comments unacceptable

Press Secretary Sean Spicer's recent comments during Passover regarding Adolf Hitler, Syrian leader Bashar Assad and poison gas were totally insensitive and inexcusable ("Sean Spicer: I 'let the president down' with Hitler-Assad comments," Web, April 12).

Muslim leaders must seek change

If the recent attempt by Islamists to kill Coptic Pope Tawadros II does not finally open the eyes of the world to the fact that Islam is not a religion but an ideology seeking total domination, then we are blind ("Suicide bombers kill 44 at Palm Sunday services in Egypt," Web, April 9).

President Donald Trump, accompanied by first lady Melania Trump waves to onlookers as he enters Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea in Palm Beach, Fla., for an Easter Service, Sunday, April 16, 2017. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

The war for Trump's ear

There's an ominous rumble of war in Korea, there's always an ominous rumble of war in the Middle East, but in Washington we've already got the real thing. The combatants are taking no prisoners and the rules of the Geneva Convention do not apply.

Ohio State kicker Sean Nuernberger plays in their NCAA college spring football game Saturday, April 15, 2017, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Guns are big, but football's bigger

Guns are big in Arkansas, but hogs and football can be bigger. The National Rifle Association took on the Razorbacks of the University of Arkansas over a law that would have enabled fans to take their guns to the game, and the Razorbacks won.

A hooded penitent from "Cristo de los Angeles" brotherhood holds a cross inside the "Gaitanas" church before taking part in a traditional annual Holy Week procession in Toledo, Spain, Tuesday, April 11, 2017. Hundreds of processions take place throughout Spain during the Easter Holy Week. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

Why America needs God

- The Washington Times

Atheists and progressives will tell you America is a secular nation, built on secular principles, and that it's the job of the rising generations to make sure politics and religion never do meet. They are wrong.

Han Song Ryol, North Korea's vice foreign minister, listens to a translator during an interview with The Associated Press on Friday, April 14, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Han Song Ryol said the situation on the Korean Peninsula is now in a "vicious cycle." (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

John Bolton hits it on head with North Korea

- The Washington Times

Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton offered up a pretty blunt assessment of the North Korea thang that went like this: Want to get rid of the nuke threat from that regime? Then take out the regime.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Donald Trump and his flexible mind

- The Washington Times

If chaos is the sign of growth -- and sometimes that's a fair description of progress -- Donald Trump is on course to build an administration that can survive the fits, starts and mistakes of a drawn-out opening night.

Illustration on the work of Fred Kelly Grant by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unsung hero of rural America

While President Trump and Congress tackle federal regulations and the agencies that promulgate them, Fred Kelly Grant is quietly doing the same -- and succeeding -- with the most powerful weapon you've likely never heard of.

Trump's not so great deal with China

President Trump's recent summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping was only modestly successful. The hard reality is that on both security and economic issues, the United States and China are rivals -- not partners -- and much tougher days lie ahead.

President Trump now is convinced that the Export-Import Bank's corporate welfare produces jobs. He said he would nominate people to fill its vacant board seats. (Associated Press)

Doing the policy zigzag

It's not wrong for a president to change his mind as circumstances warrant, but Donald Trump is setting a record for ditching major positions he staked out in his 2016 campaign.

Detail of 'The Statue of Brothers' at The War Memorial of Koea in Seoul. Photo illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Countdown to one Korea

That drumbeat you hear is Korea marching toward unification. No gunshots. No missile launches. No tanks rumbling over the 38th parallel as in June 1950.

Hooded penitents from "Jesus con la Cruz a Cuestas" brotherhood hold lanterns with candles they take part in a traditional annual Holy Week procession in Segovia, Spain, Thursday, April 13, 2017. Hundreds of processions take place throughout Spain during the Easter Holy Week. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

The Passion of the Christ

Straightaway in the morning, the chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes and the whole council, and bound Jesus, and carried him away, and delivered Him to Pilate.

In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. Twitter users are poking fun at United's tactics in having a man removed from an overbooked Chicago to Louisville flight on April 9, 2017.  (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File) **FILE**

United Airlines and the golden age of airline deregulation

- The Washington Times

Blame Islamist terrorists and, yes, government airline deregulation for United Airlines' thuggish and bloody assault on a passenger on April 10. (Let the record show that for a decade I editorialized for deregulation and still think, within rational limits - I want a Food and Drug Administration -- the freer the markets the better for consumers and society in general.)

A European Union flag waves in the wind in front of the Chancellery in Berlin on Oct. 12, 2012. **FILE**

'Old Europe' sinks under the weight of secular progressivism

This week the existential problems facing the European Union came into stark relief as Belgium threatened Poland and Hungary with legal action if they did not agree to commit cultural suicide by letting in hundreds of thousands of "refugees" from the Middle East. This comes on the heels of Facebook-livestreamed rapes in Sweden, truck attacks in France and other Western European capitals, and jihadist bombs targeting the buses of famous soccer teams in Germany.