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Smoking Gun Flash Drive Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Rohrabacher-Assange meeting

- The Washington Times

California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher’s recent three-hour meeting with WikiLeaks head Julian Assange as reported earlier this week by The Hill may prove interesting in light of the allegations of several former high-ranking U.S. intelligence analysts that the Democratic National Committee was not hacked by the Russians or anyone else prior to last fall’s presidential election.

Illustration on the results of automatic voter registration law by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Guarding election integrity

In 1993, when President Clinton signed the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA), its boosters claimed that it would solve, once and for all, a plethora of problems plaguing the nation’s voter registration rolls.

The Extinction of the Republican Party Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Replacing the Republican Party

Having refused to repeal Obamacare, the Republican Party is dead, as was the Whig Party in 1854 after it colluded in the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act which opened these territories to slavery.

Illustration on Putin's long-term strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Putin’s strategy and the U.S. response

At the end of the Cold War, Russia was a facsimile of itself. Shorn of empire, the Russians appeared to be a weak regional power, if that.

Trump’s record on race

One lesson I’ve learned from working for Donald Trump is that you have to pay attention to what he does, not what he says. The left and the media are on a rampage accusing President Trump of being a racist and Nazi-KKK sympathizer because of his words in response to the horrid events in Charlottesville.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democrats search for another Lost Cause

- The Washington Times

Union scouts have already discovered Robert E. Lee at the gates of the city, lining up the gallant Pelham’s artillery to fire the opening round, and Stonewall Jackson and Jeb Stuart are expected to arrive on a night train from the Shenandoah Valley.

Illustration on diplomatic options for North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Red-teaming’ the diplomatic option in Korea

Should President Trump meet personally with Kim Jong-un? John Glover, a graduate student at George Mason University wrote an article advocating such a meeting and, frankly, I think that he’s on to something.

Trump's Go-ahead for Infrastructure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Repairing, updating and expanding infrastructure

One of the biggest barriers to investment in infrastructure all across the United States is the long, costly, and unpredictable permitting process. If you have any doubts, just consider the Keystone XL pipeline extension.

Hatred of the Jews returns with a flourish

Anti-Semitism and white supremacy are far from dead in the United States of America. That’s what this past weekend’s violence told the world.

Illustration on men and women in the workplace and attitudes on gender roles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scapegoats, dupes and gulls

Identity politics has gone over the top, and the flood of intolerance is drenching everyone. What began as a campaign to re-right injustice has created injustice. What was meant to change attitudes toward intolerance has become intolerance enthroned.

Illustration on North Korea's backing down by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Armageddon postponed

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un appears to have blinked and President Trump can claim a foreign policy victory and justification for his strategy.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America’s sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear — again — that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America’s immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

Related Articles

No God? No morality

Your Aug. 7 editorial discusses the banality of urban murder, a sign of our secularist times ("'Nobody kill anybody,' but 'nobody' listened," Web). Regarding the epidemic of big-city violence, reference was made to the solemnity of the biblical Sixth Commandment, "Thou shall not kill," but the reality is that the other nine commandments are likewise honored mostly in the breach, in Baltimore and elsewhere. On the streets, life is cheap.

'Fire and fury' diplomacy

Though it wasn't picked up by anyone in the cowering news media, who were busy hiding under their desks when President Trump warned North Korea that if they continued with their provocation, they would face "fire and fury, the likes of which we've never seen before," Mr. Trump was actually testing a little-known theory of his.

Fans wave flags of Puerto Rico as compatriot Ivan Rodriguez speaks during his induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

Cleaning up Puerto Rico's mess

Puerto Rico continues to struggle with the consequences of irresponsibly running up debt. It owes debtors about $70 billion, and a default on debt which was due to be fully repaid by last month has made things worse. The Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act, enacted last year after President Obama and House Speaker Paul Ryan applied pressure on Congress, was supposed to prevent things like that. Instead it threatens to accelerate the rate of collapse.

In this April 6, 2017, file photo, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center in New York. The AP reported on Aug. 4, 2017, that a headline casting doubt on millions of votes for Clinton falsely describes the gist of a National Public Radio story published four years before the 2016 presidential election. Clinton was defeated by Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election but won the popular vote by nearly 2.9 million votes, according to a count by the AP. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

Deeper into the swamp

Sending a defeated rival to the penitentiary is not the American way (except, maybe, in New Jersey, Illinois or Louisiana). But in a swamp there's always an alligator eager to bite off any fingers searching in the murk for the drain plug.

D.C. should focus on public health, not public hospital

- The Washington Times

If your thing is having a ring-side seat for Round 2 of the Vincent Gray-Muriel Bowser battle royale, however, start making plans. Just make sure you and your pregnant significant other also have a Plan B. That's because the District has shut down obstetric services for 90 days at United Medical Center, the lone full-service hospital on the southeast end of the District. No deliveries and no neonatal care, which can place hardship on some mothers-to-be, especially those who had planned to have their bundles of joy there.

Trump's 'fire and fury' sure beats Obama's butt-kissing

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, as the media's been steadily reporting for hours now, has vowed to respond to North Korea's ongoing threats against the United States with "fire and fury." The timid have gasped. But the truth is: North Korea deserves this response. The regime brought it on itself. And without a doubt, Trump's hardline approach beats Barack Obama's timid wait-and-see approach.

In this Nov. 14, 2016, file photo, Caitlyn Jenner arrives at the Glamour Women of the Year Awards in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File) **FILE**

Caitlyn Jenner commits a hat crime

Imagine this: Someone goes through massive body-altering, gender-changing surgery, changes her life and risks the rejection of her family, all in order to be her genuine self.

Illustration of Bashar Assad by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

One for the graveyard of Middle East predictions

"The Middle East is the graveyard of predictions" notes the left-wing writer and editor Adam Shatz. That's partly because it's so volatile (no one in 2014 imagined the revival of an executive caliphate after 11 centuries) and it's perverse (Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan started a near-civil war against the Kurds to win constitutional powers he already enjoys).

Illustration on international aid to Africa by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Africa development imperative

Africa, the world's poorest continent, will see its population double over the next three decades. Without significant development progress, this population tidal wave will cause great human suffering, trigger destabilizing migrations and impact global security.

President Donald Trump listens as Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C. speaks during a meeting with the Republican Study Committee, Friday, March 17, 2017, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Why the West must cut the apologies

In early July, President Trump delivered what many believe was his best speech to date. Speaking at Krasinski Square in Warsaw, Poland, Mr. Trump gave an unabashed defense of the cultural values that have made Western civilization great.

Illustration on outsourcing U.S. air power in Afghanistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Outsourcing the air war in Afghanistan

Erik Prince, the owner of the former Blackwater security company, has proposed that the U.S. military outsource the air war in Afghanistan to him. Gen. John Nicholson, who currently commands the NATO effort in the war, has apparently refused to give the Prince proposal an airing.

Illustration on the hidden costs of hospitalization by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sickening hospital bills

A Yale study, and an accompanying profile in The New York Times, made waves this month for exposing what's called "surprise billing." This occurs when a patient receives a high, out-of-network bill for care received at an in-network hospital.