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Ron Wyden (Associated Press)

The churls and their denial and grief

- The Washington Times

Life is not fair to losers, or the critics of Donald Trump, and the way he won the presidency. He just won’t stand still and give the rotten eggs a chance to hit their mark.

Illustration on the promotion of U.S. trade by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s nationalism will preserve international stability

Economists and foreign policy experts fear Donald Trump’s economic nationalism will disrupt the global institutions that have fostered international economic cooperation and security for seven decades and instigate chaos.

The selection of Betsy DeVos to run the Department of Education was likely an easy call for President-elect Donald Trump, who during the campaign regularly championed school choice and the charter school movement, giving a nod to school choice when announcing his pick. (Associated Press)

The administration billionaires

President-elect Donald Trump and his Cabinet nominees won’t be in office until next month, but the stock market is already showing bullish signs of better days ahead under his pro-growth, tax reform agenda.

Putting Off the Congo Elections Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of a hasty Congo election

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been the target of criticism in recent weeks with editorials in major newspapers calling on our president to step down.

Illustration of John Bolton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘The man with the bushy moustache’

President-elect Donald Trump would be best served by selecting a secretary of State who understands the national security challenges our country faces, can literally “hit the ground running,” has a proven track record of successful negotiations, and most importantly, not only protects but projects the greatest attributes about America’s ideals of freedom and democracy.

Illustration on clueless, know-nothing spinning events in the Obama administration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

27-year-old know-nothings

Many think as a society we have slipped past the line defining our ability to discern reality from political spin. On the other hand, we are generations of conditioned consumers who have been subjected to the most sophisticated ad campaigns ever imagined. In short, if there is or has ever been a way to sell something, we have heard or seen it.

Texas Border Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Quick fixes for border issues

Heroin deaths have crossed the 100 barrier as reported by the Police Department in Anne Arundel County, Md., on a billboard outside its headquarters in Millersville. At this rate, deaths may reach 120 by the end of the year. That would mean that 20 young residents of my county who are alive today will not live to see the New Year as a result of heroin and fentanyl illegally trafficked across the border into the United States from China and Mexico.

Ashleigh Dickerson and her daughter Christian, 10, talk with temporary neighbor Daron Brose, in the hotel where they are now living, in Denham Springs, La., Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. Before the floods came, Ashleigh Dickersons family lived in a three-bedroom house on a private road with plenty of room for her young children to play. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Rules that wreck housing affordability

The White House recently released a report on housing affordability, pointing out that rental rates are rising faster than incomes in many cities, thanks to a lack of housing supply.

Dutch Canary Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The canary in the free speech coal mine

A safety practice used in the early days of coal mining involved the use of canaries. Since these birds were susceptible to the ill effects of deadly toxic gas exposure before humans, caged canaries brought into the mines were closely monitored as an early warning system of lurking danger.

Sally Abrahamsen (right), of Pompano Beach, Fla., holds a Glock 42 pistol while shopping for a gun at the National Armory gun store and gun range in Pompano Beach on Jan. 5, 2016. At left is salesperson T.J. O'Reilly. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Armed and alive

Sunrise, Fla.: A burglar was fatally shot Monday after breaking into a home in the 4300 block of Northwest 103rd Terrace in Sunrise, authorities said. Police said the suspect was taken to Broward Health Medical Center, where he later died.

Illustration on Trump's enthusiasm for India by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A ‘big fan’ of India waits in the wings

As the dust settles on the most divisive and rancorous election campaign in American history, India, like the rest of the world, is coming to terms with Republican Donald Trump as the next president of the world’s most powerful country.

Illustration on the liberal plaudits for Fidel Castro by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The liberal romance with Fidel Castro

There appears to be an awful lot of sympathy for the devil out there these days. The death of Fidel Castro, a mass murderer masquerading as a “president,” exposed the bizarre romance liberals have with tyrants.

Illustration on the problematic Zumwalt class destroyer by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Navy’s Zumwalt problem

Some problems in life are so big they defy summary, maybe even resolution. Still, they are important. On the list go societal differences about religion, politics, and now the U.S. Navy’s Zumwalt-class destroyer.

Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The melting of campus snowflakes

- The Washington Times

Academic freedom, once so popular in the faculty lounges, appears to be optional on many campuses where college presidents wilt under the first squeals of snowflakes.

Related Articles

Comey a patsy in Clinton affair

In "The Federal Bureau of Political Investigation" (Web, Nov. 16) Andrew P. Napolitano calls FBI Director James Comey's July 5 press conference, during which Mr. Comey said Hillary Clinton "would not be prosecuted," and his reopening and subsequent re-closing of that same investigation "unlawful."

Illustration on protecting religious liberty by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Protecting religious liberty

In 1994, nearly every member of Congress supported legislation affirming that the free exercise of religion is an "unalienable right." Four years later, Congress unanimously declared that religious freedom "undergirds the very origin and existence of the United States."

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. speaks at his weekly news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

'Don't drain my swamp'

The Democrats lost the 2016 elections because they weren't listening, and treated voters with legitimate concerns as racists, bigots and deplorables. Some Republicans in Congress aren't listening now.

Rudy Giuliani (Associated Press)

Chaos in transition, business as usual

- The Washington Times

The Democrats and their media acolytes keep sorting through the entrails of road kill looking for clues to find the disaster to unmake the making of the president. So far nothing has worked.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Precious and Grace: No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (17)'

Very few authors can write about forgiveness and do it with grace. Alexander McCall Smith is one of them. He writes with a philosophy infused with gentleness, whether it is about an orphaned dog or a woman who is brought to realize that there is still happiness in bitter memories.

The Grief of the Democrats Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'We just got a shellacking'

- The Washington Times

"We just had a shellacking. We just got a shellacking last Tuesday. We got an unexpected defeat and we've got to recalibrate it and decide how we go forward," Rep. G.K. Butterfield, the chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus told CNN this week after Donald Trump and Republicans swept elections in the House and Senate.

Stop punishing males

Enough. After the decades of damage they have done to anything male, Hillary Clinton, radical feminism and political correctness need to go ("'It's not her fault!': Hillary Clinton looks for excuses, ignores her party's failings," Web, Nov. 16).

Clinton mocked life and lost

Now that the 2016 presidential election is over, the pollsters and pundits continue to sift through statistics and polls in a desperate attempt to figure out where they went wrong.

In this May 16, 2012, file photo, the Facebook logo is displayed on an iPad in Philadelphia.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

When 'news' is a baloney sandwich

Half the world is getting information, sometimes labeled "news," from the internet. At the fingertips of 3.6 billion people there's a repository of knowledge so vast that it might as well be infinite. Self-appointed gatekeepers are cutting the flow down to a manageable size, but how they trim determines its shape. It's sometimes delivered in odd shapes.

U.S. President Barack Obama leaves Air Force One at the Tegel airport in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016, after arriving for a three-day official visit which is the second stop of his final foreign tour as president. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

President Obama's 'helpful' exit

Barack Obama yearns to be the great explainer. He opened his first term with a tour of the Middle East to explain Islam to the world, and now he's finishing his second term with a final, abbreviated world tour trying to explain Donald Trump to everybody. He got the lesson about Islam wrong, and he's spreading misinformation now about the meaning of the American election.

Illustration on the Obama presidency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Donald Trump and the real black swan event

- The Washington Times

The election of Donald Trump as president has been regarded by some as a black swan event: an extremely rare occurrence so unexpected and consequential that it generates stunning changes in the existing order.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Blockchain Revolution' and 'Digital Gold'

Election update: While world stock markets gyrated after the election of Donald Trump, the price of Bitcoin charged steadily upward. Meanwhile, Forrester Research predicts a cybercrisis in the first 100 days of the Trump administration

 President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a rally in New York. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File) ** FILE **

The start of the deal

President-elect Donald Trump faces the challenge of governing a deeply divided nation.

Illustration on the gender gap in terms of education by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Massacre at Gender Gap

When the term Gender Gap was coined several decades ago it sounded like something from a playful movie satire set in the Old West. Gender Gap gained prominence in the language of politics when Ronald Reagan was elected president in 1980 with 55 percent of male voters and just 47 percent of the women.