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Law Enforcement at the Border Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Immigration reform must start with border enforcement

As a veteran border patrol officer, I can say without any reservations that our immigration system is completely dysfunctional. Immigrants permitted to come to the United States have a cumbersome and expensive time doing so. Those who aren’t permitted to enter waltz across the border by the tens of thousands, and those not allowed to remain here elude deportations, even after committing serious crimes against our citizens.

Palestinian Hamas supporters hold up their hands while chanting Islamic slogans as masked members from the Izzedine al-Qassam Brigades, a military wing of Hamas, march with their weapons on vehicles during a rally a long the street of Rafah refugee camp, Gaza Strip, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

The next round of Hamas vs. Israel

Words can bewitch. Soon, the seemingly benign phrase “cycle of violence,” will be applied once again to the Hamas-Israel conflict. The linguistic effect of this application will be to equate terrorism and counterterrorism, further blurring the always-essential distinction between international crime and international law enforcement.

Elmar Abdullayev, 55, stands at a gates of his home hit by shelling in a village of Gapinli, in Terter region of Azerbaijan on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. Azerbaijan and separatist forces in Nagorno-Karabakhk on Tuesday agreed on a cease-fire starting noon local time following three days of the heaviest fighting in the disputed region since 1994, the Azeri defense ministry announced. Gapanli, a village south of Terter, has been one of the hardest hit. Houses bear the marks of the recent shelling; metal doors are riddled with shrapnel, power lines are cut down, craters are seen in the yards. (AP Photo/ Hicran Babayev)

An ‘unfrozen’ conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh

Recently, one of Vladimir Putin’s foreign policy functionaries made another outrageous statement on the status of the Azerbaijani region of Nagorno-Karabakh. Evgeniy Satanovsky, the head of Russian Institute of the Near East, visited the separatist region (in contravention of international law) in mid-June and declared: “As I understand it, the issue that Karabakh is part of Azerbaijan, in terms of military logic and from the standpoint of practical politics is completely closed.”

Safety of Chromium-6 Levels in North Carolina Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Exaggerating chromium risks

Constant claims, counterclaims and accusations about coal ash contaminating surface and underground water are making North Carolinians feel like they’re watching a fast-paced tennis match. Even people with chemistry degrees must feel bewildered by assertions that parts per million or billion of chromium-6 may cause cancer.

Growing the Movement with Hate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s hypocritical anti-Semitism

In its new platform, Black Lives Matter (BLM) has, despite the total lack of relevance to its own agenda or interests, thrown whatever heft it has behind the anti-Semitic movement to Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (BDS) Israel. In doing so, it is inarguably contributing to the campaign to “other” the world’s only Jewish state and, with it, the Jews themselves.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press)

Virginia’s McAuliffe is for losers

All the fuss about Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe trying to restore voting rights to felons who have served their sentences is just fuss, nothing more. To be sure, it appears at first glance that the chief executive of the Old Dominion is really concerned about civil rights for the downtrodden.

Terrorists Present in the U.S. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No plan to stop foreign-born terrorists

For decades, foreign-born Islamic terrorists have been exploiting our immigration system. Almost every type of immigration has been exploited by terrorists, from temporary legal immigration to illegal immigration to humanitarian immigration.

Overheated concern about July’s warmth

Mainstream media report that July was the “hottest” month since 1880 (or as CNN wrongly reported, “ever”). And future Julys will only become hotter.

Gravesite of Main Stream Media Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The legacy media meltdown over Donald Trump

The meltdown of the American legacy media is now complete. Conservatives are sadly aware of the decline of The New York Times, the supposed “newspaper of record,” as the benchmark for legacy media in general.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Scranton, Pa. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

For sale, the most brazen president money can buy

- The Washington Times

It’s coming clear now why Hillary Clinton wanted her own email server, free from oversight by anyone, and why she resisted so ferociously enabling anyone from getting even a hint to what she was hiding. Her presidency, if there is one, has been sold, and a new batch of emails pried out of the government by Judicial Watch reveals the going rate for Hillary.

Gen. Jack Vessey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A soldier’s soldier

Until he died last week at 94, former Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. John W. Vessey Jr. was a living memorial to an earlier America — where God and country were not seen as contradictions, where faith formed the bedrock of personal and national character.

Defining alcohol consumption down

With summer vacation drawing to a close, many parents are eager to pop a bottle of bubbly in celebration.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. **File (Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Imperial dreams

Historically, the West has faced an existential threat from both the Persian and Russian empires. The Persian Empire was fueled by the expansionist dreams of Darius and Xerxes, foiled only by the heroism of the Greeks, led by men like Themistocles.

Related Articles

Government out of whack

The wheels of our three branches of government are enormously out of balance. The judicial branch decides that health insurance premiums are taxes, the executive branch legislates via executive order, the legislative branch writes laws, and government agencies take charge.

Jacob Zuma Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Of arms and the man named Zuma

- The Washington Times

I first met Jacob Zuma, South Africa's controversial president, in 2002 when he was serving as then-President Thabo Mbeki's vice president. I was in South Africa at the behest of a number of South African outfitters and professional hunters to urge the government to reject a British-inspired laundry list of firearms regulations that would have crippled big-game hunting in South Africa.

BOOK REVIEW: 'This Must be the Place'

We've all said, "This must be the place," after being frustrated by the hassles of finding our way somewhere. Perhaps the directions have been poor, or the map less than useful. And with all the effort expended, it's still not entirely certain that this really is the place: It's more that other possibilities have been excluded.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gives a speech on the economy after touring Futuramic Tool & Engineering, in Warren, Mich., Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

When a presidential race rages out of control

- The Washington Times

It's the conceit of every generation that horses have never been faster, whisky has never been older, beautiful women have never been younger — and politics have never been rowdier. But maybe our generation has a legitimate claim.

Trump a better choice for Israel

Two proudly Jewish conservative pundits, Charles Krauthammer and Mark Levin, as well as other Jewish #NeverTrump movement members, seem to be doing their best to dampen enthusiasm about and dissuade millions of conservatives from actively supporting Donald Trump.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to medical professionals after taking a tour of Borinquen Health Care Center, in Miami, Fla., Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016, to see how they are combatting Zika. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary and the Second Amendment

Another day, another Donald Trumpism to exploit and enjoy. What the Republican candidate actually said about Hillary Clinton and the Second Amendment was quickly lost in the Democratic hysteria that always follows any hint of g-u-n-s. (We can't even say the word.)

Illustration on secret service experience with Hillary Clinton's temperament by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The temperament issue

If you are wondering about Donald Trump's temperament after some of his remarks, you might want to compare it with Hillary Clinton's.

FILE - The main building of the National Institutes of Health is seen in Bethesda, Md., in this Aug. 17, 2009 file photo. Ten clinicians with a Boston-based nonprofit organization responding to the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone are to be transported to the United States after one of their colleagues was infected with the deadly disease.  The clinician who became infected has already been evacuated and is receiving treatment at the National Institutes of Health. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

The coming age of the chimera

Flights of fantasy have long envisioned animals with human traits. George Lucas' "Star Wars" entertained millions of movie fans with an iconic tavern scene where all manner of beastly aliens packed a drinking dive and behaved in a way that any visitor to a biker bar would recognize. Beasts behaving badly.

Illustration on the health and abundance of bees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Stinging fears over 'bee-pocalypse'

"Pollinator summits" in Minnesota and elsewhere during the past year have showcased discussions among beekeepers, landscapers, farmers and government agencies on how to better protect honeybees, butterflies, birds and bats that pollinate flowers, crops and other plants.

Illustration on the electoral impact of a "silent majority" by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The great silent majority may surprise Trump, Clinton and us all

- The Washington Times

Every four years like clockwork, the two major presidential nominees present their competing visions for the future of the country. This year, however, those visions are so starkly different as to be nearly irreconcilable. They may, in fact, indicate a breach far deeper and more searing than previously thought.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at Abraham Lincoln High School, in Des Moines, Iowa, Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Those 'old, tired ideas'

Reacting to Donald Trump's speech Monday to the Detroit Economic Club, Hillary Clinton said her Republican opponent tried to "make his old, tired ideas sound new." As opposed to her old, tired ideas of higher taxes on the wealthy with government as redistributor.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Chance Developments'

It is Sister Flora's first day in the world outside the walls of the convent where she has lived for 10 years, and she has cheerful plans to spend the money she inherited from her uncle and to find a husband.

Illustration on the questionable safety of imported Canadian drugs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Danger in drugs from Canada

When it comes to health care reform, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have something in common -- and it's dangerously wrong. They support drug importation "from Canada." It's a sound-bite solution that won't offer lower prices but will result in a public health calamity.

Hillary Short Circuit Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton 'short-circuited'

When former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was asked last week if she has misled the American people on the issue of her failure to safeguard state secrets contained in her emails, she told my Fox News colleague, Chris Wallace, that the FBI had exonerated her. When pressed by Mr. Wallace, she argued that FBI Director James Comey said that her answers to the American people were truthful.