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Trump’s $10 trillion stimulus plan

All of Washington seems to be in cardiac arrest over the news reports late last week that President Donald Trump is planning a budget with $10 trillion of budget cuts over the next decade.

The 45 percent tariff

President Trump’s proposed 45 percent tariff on Chinese imports could leverage significant changes in trade with the Middle Kingdom, but to succeed he must address Beijing more realistically than past presidents.

Preventing another Pearl Harbor

North Korea regularly threatens to turn the United States and neighboring states into “a sea of fire,” and reportedly has the capability now to launch nuclear weapons at targets in South Korea and Japan. In a televised address this New Year’s Day, North Korea’s eccentric leader, Kim Jong Un, claimed that preparations were nearly complete for testing an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of striking the United States.

Nobel Prize Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s Nobel Peace Prize

History will judge whether former President Obama deserved the Nobel Peace Prize he was awarded shortly after being elected the 44th president of the United States. President Trump has the historic opportunity to truly earn this prestigious award by using his self-proclaimed mastery of deal-making to resolve one of the world’s intractable conflicts of the former Soviet Union; namely, the “frozen conflict” between Azerbaijan and Armenia over the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh.

President-elect Donald Trump, left, and his wife Melania Trump arrive to the "Make America Great Again Welcome Concert" at the Lincoln Memorial, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A hearty last laugh for the Donald

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s greatest contribution to America will be his stripping the media, particularly the overpaid and undereducated television media, of its last pretense to fairness and objectivity.

Russian President Vladimir Putin takes part in the launching ceremony of Bovanenkovo-Ukhta 2 gas pipeline and the Zapolyarye-Purpe and Kuyumba-Taishet oil pipelines via video link in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

The Trump-Putin friendship

As President-elect Donald Trump prepares to take office today, yet another nominee in his forthcoming Cabinet is staking out sharp differences with his views on foreign policy.

Classified Dossier Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Democrats’ ‘dossier’

The recent intelligence report on Russian interference in the election concluded that the Russian government was behind the hacking and release of Democratic emails. The assumed purpose of these activities was an effort to support the candidacy of Donald Trump, even though the report acknowledged that the Russian government believed Hillary Clinton was likely to win the election anyway.

Texas Power Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The power of Rick Perry

As former energy secretaries in a Republican and Democratic administration, we can say with complete confidence that President-elect Donald Trump has made an excellent choice in nominating Rick Perry to be secretary of energy. From our perspective, Mr. Perry has precisely the background, skill set and vision needed to effectively oversee the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and guide the nation’s energy strategies.

Prospects for the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pruitt is right for the EPA

Of all the ways the outgoing Obama administration has waged war on the private sector, nothing has been as deeply felt as the economically harmful actions taken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer speaks at a recent news conference Monday, May 23, 2016, regarding a new ordinance for the city regarding drugs in San Diego.  Faulconer's low-key style has gone down well with voters after the high drama of a predecessor who resigned and pleaded guilty to a felony for harassing women. The Republican leader is a heavy favorite to win a second term as mayor of the nation's eighth-largest city. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

Making America’s cities great again

The historic, controversial presidential election of 2016 is now behind us. The people decided. Now comes the hard part, governing. As usually happens after a presidential campaign, serious, talented individuals come forth to help. There is something magical about contributing to a new federal administration, a chance to effect change across America.

FILE - In this May 10, 2016, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves at parade participants at the Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea is marking Kim Jong Un's birthday Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017 in a decidedly low-key manner. Though the young leader's birthday is well-known throughout the country, it has yet to be celebrated with the kind of adulatory festivities that accompany the birthdays of his late grandfather and father. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

China’s boost to North Korean nukes

Allowing North Korea to make consistent progress toward the fielding of a nuclear-armed intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of reaching most American cities can be considered President Obama’s most serious failure in national security and non-proliferation.

Washington’s chance to reform the status quo

The United States is a great nation, but we face many serious challenges that need to be addressed. Two key ones relate to the need to ensure fiscal sustainability and achieve government transformation. As a recognized expert in these areas, I have several thoughts that I believe President-elect Donald Trump needs to consider.

Related Articles

Illustration on Jeff Sessions facing opposition by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The case for Sessions

At the beginning of my first term in Congress I paid symbolic respect to a man I have known for over 22 years by voting for him as Speaker of the House. That man is Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions.

Illustration on U. S. intelligence agencies by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

Intelligence reporting in lockstep

The American intelligence community has found itself in the spotlight in recent days. Whether or not the nation learns with any degree of certainty about how intelligence professionals came to their conclusions about Vladimir Putin, one thing is clear: We should view the current state of American intelligence with some skepticism. It was alarming, to say the least, when current intelligence agencies — 17, to be precise — unanimously reported the same thing about Russian meddling with little or no detail. We then learned over the weekend that according to Rep. Devin Nunes, chairman of the House Select Committee on Intelligence, the 17 reporting intelligence agencies on which President Obama has relied and commented at length, was actually only three agencies.

Crony Capitalism in Optometry Market Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Time

The government's war on contact lenses

Imagine you are shopping for a new car, but you're forced by law to buy only from your local Chevy dealer. No cross-shopping other makes -- or other dealerships. You have to buy from this one dealer -- and only the models he's got on the floor.

FILE - In this Aug. 25, 2015, file photo, Miami-based Univision anchor Jorge Ramos, left, asks Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump a question about his immigration proposal during a news conference in Dubuque, Iowa. Ramos was later removed from the room. Trump spokesman Sean Spicer said on Monday, Jan. 9, 2017, that the President-elect would meet with Univision President and CEO Randy Falco and the company's chief news and digital officer, Isaac Lee. The meeting happens after Trump and the Spanish-language broadcaster clashed repeatedly during the presidential campaign. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

The resiliency of conservatism

Elections rarely come and go without many of us on the right debating that question. Sure, some of the discussions devolve into counterproductive food fights. But others are very healthy, and are just what you'd expect when dealing with such a vibrant, timeless governing philosophy.

Illustration on the U. S. history of meddling in international affairs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Russian hacking and glass houses

Many top U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that Russian President Vladimir Putin directed a secret intelligence operation for the purpose of discrediting Hillary Clinton, thereby helping Donald Trump win the 2016 presidential election.

Illustration of Nat Hentoff by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A taste for authentic liberalism

- The Washington Times

Nat Hentoff, who died Saturday at age 91, was a champion of a classical liberalism that is no longer in vogue. He believed, above all, in freedom, the individual and the free speech guarantees found in the First Amendment of our Bill of Rights. He was in many ways the conscience of the First Amendment at a time when everyone from the left to right at least professed to believe in the right of those they disagreed with to speak their piece.

New York Giants' Odell Beckham (13) cannot make a catch during the second half of an NFC wild-card NFL football game against the Green Bay Packers, Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017, in Green Bay, Wis. (AP Photo/Matt Ludtke)

LOVERRO: Blowouts, bad calls and dropped balls

After three games with lopsided scores, lack of drama and the continuous story that has plagued the NFL of poor officiating, the Green Bay Packers' future Hall of Fame quarterback reminded everyone that the playoffs are supposed to feature the best the league has to offer.

Jeff Sessions was nominated by President Reagan in 1986 for a judgeship, but senators blocked him over what they said were racist tendencies. (Associated Press/File)

The black friends of Jeff Sessions

The confirmation hearings for Cabinet and other high-position nominees, of and by any president, must be fair but robust. The questions put to the nominee must be tough but just. But sometimes confirmation hearings can become what Clarence Thomas, who survived a mean and unjust hearing to become a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, called "a high-tech lynching."

The real Obama legacy

President Obama imposed regulations to help specific businesses, such as Tesla Motors and Solar City, while destroying others, such as coal companies. Tesla CEO Elon Musk has achieved massive wealth with subsidies from taxpayers. His company makes electric toys for well-to-do people.

Former Attorney General Eric Holder speaks during the second day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite,File)

California discovers states' rights

The Democratic liberals have treated the Second, Ninth and Tenth Amendments to the Constitution with the respect given to discarded Kleenex over the eight years of the Obama presidency. But California, the bluest of the blue states, has just discovered, of all things, states' rights. The ghost of Strom Thurmond and his States' Rights Democrats is apparently alive and well in Sacramento.

Congress Planning Huge Tax Burden Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Safeguarding the interests of the American consumer

As we celebrate a New Year, it appears the new Congress has made its own New Year's resolutions. Unlike the many resolutions Americans make this time of year, it seems Congress is committed to keeping this — and it should wake consumers from their post-holiday food coma.

Soviet Patent Lockdown Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why a strong patent system is vital

Last month was the 25th anniversary of the dissolution of the Soviet Union, marking the end of the Cold War. Just a few years earlier, it seemed unfathomable that a world superpower would simply disband. And yet, the USSR was destined to lose its confrontation with the U.S. despite having more nuclear weapons, being first in space, having a larger army, and sitting on a much bigger cache of natural resources. The reason was the insurmountable American lead in innovation.

Adjustable Tax, AMerica Working Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for a border adjustable tax system

If America's competitors were intentionally trying to design a tax system to destroy the American economy, they probably couldn't come up with a dumber tax system than the way the United States currently taxes our own businesses.