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The Annual Academy Liberal Awards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How not to embarrass Oscar

When you give your acceptance speeches, thank your publicist, limo driver, manicurist, masseuse, day nanny, night nanny and weekend nanny. Your attorney Marty Singer for killing that salacious National Enquirer story.

Illustration on the need to clean house at U.S. intelligence agencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rousting the anti-Flynn cabal

In the anti-Trump media war, it is nearly impossible to keep the names straight without a scorecard. Barely had Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn’s name faded from the news cycle than he was replaced by H.R. McMaster, another lieutenant general most Americans have never heard of. Will this latest general be any more fortunate than his predecessor? Only if he can overcome the frenzied machinations of the Obama deep state.

President Donald Trump, right, speaks as Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, listens at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The downside of a Trump tariff

When word got out in January 1848 that gold had been discovered at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California, near Sacramento, it triggered the famous California Gold Rush, which in a few short years brought some 300,000 fortune seekers to the territory, whose population at the time was just 155,000, most of them Native Americans.

Attack on the Earth by the Evil Empire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Time’s misreading of science

As demonstrated by the confirmation hearings of Scott Pruitt for new Environmental Protection Agency chief, all-out war is being waged against the Trump administration by leftists who believe science is under attack from the evil empire.

President Donald Trump walks with Housing and Urban Development Secretary-designate Dr. Ben Carson, as they pass a exhibit honoring Carson during a tour of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Trump-Reagan parallels

The media laugh at any attempt to compare President Trump with former President Ronald Reagan, but there are many similarities, not the least of which are the withering attacks both men endured while running for and as president.

Milo Yiannopoulos      Associated Press photo

An expensive lesson for conservatives

- The Washington Times

The more the culture bounds out of control, the more the wary have to take care with the company they keep. This applies to media that will print anything in pursuit of “clicks” and “hits,” and to well-meaning organizations about whom they invite to tutor their true believers.

No deal for a two-state solution

“The president is committed to peace. That’s as far as I want to go on that,” said President Trump’s press secretary, Sean Spicer, on Feb. 3 in answer to a reporter’s inquiry regarding the Trump administration’s position on the “two-state solution” for peace between the Palestinians and Israelis. Will Mr. Trump push the two-state paradigm, like George W. Bush and Barack Obama before him, or will the White House realize that this idea is a dangerous fantasy like the irrational Iran nuclear deal?

Retirement Planning Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing for the long term

Ordinary investors can’t be blamed for hesitancy about stocks with market indexes trading near record levels and President Trump’s radical, sometimes quixotic ideas creating so much uncertainty. Yet patience and a diversified portfolio remain the best long-term investment strategy.

FILE - This 2015 file photo provided by the Bloomington Normal Airport Authority shows a damaged wing of a Cirrus SR22 single-engine plane at the Central Illinois Regional Airport in Bloomington, Ill. Once seen as a luxury of the corporate world, private planes are becoming increasingly common at U.S. colleges and universities as schools try to attract athletes, raise money and reward coaches with jet-set vacations. Iowa State University President Steven Leath, a pilot, acknowledged last year that he used a school plane for trips that mixed personal and university business, a practice that came to light after he damaged the aircraft in a hard landing. (Bloomington Normal Airport Authority via AP, File)

TripAdvisor’s Stockholm Syndrome

Despite producing huge amounts of value for society, businesses are among the most vilified institutions in America.

Illustration on the drawbacks of Obamacare risk pools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to lower Obamacare premiums

The Affordable Care Act is in a “death spiral,” warns Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini. Premiums have doubled since the end of 2013, and yet insurers are rapidly exiting the individual market, leaving consumers in many parts of the nation at risk of having no coverage.

Illustration on plans to defeat radical Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating radical Islam

Who is the enemy? It’s been over 15 years since Sept. 11, 2001, and this fundamental question still rattles around. Prominent answers have included evildoers, violent extremists, terrorists, Muslims, and Islamists.

Congressman Matt Cartwright speaks during a rally held at the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Congress must stop death by decree

At the first meeting of the Trump Leadership Council — an advisory group consisting of top CEOs from major companies — President Donald Trump asked these business leaders what was their biggest problem. I expected the answer to be America’s anti-growth tax system.

Increasing Cyber Vandalism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cyberhacking to come

If you thought the 2016 presidential election was an orgy of cyber hacking of Hillary Clinton’s private email server, of the Democratic Party computers being trawled through, and of fake news stories about Donald Trump’s hijinks in Russia, you are right. But you ain’t seen nothing yet.

Illustration on choice in health care by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

How the market can fix health care

Republicans agree that Obamacare has failed and must be repealed. But they can’t agree on the replacement “plan.”

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Lady Gaga performing at the halftime show for Superbowl 51     Associated Press photo

Halftime at the Super Bowl

Halftime at the Super Bowl, once merely a forgettable 30 minutes to get another beer or join the line at the restroom, is more entertaining now. Halftime at the Super Bowl sometimes gets different reviews from different generations. But this year everyone could find something to be dazzled by in Lady Gaga's terrific patriotic pop.

In this undated photo provided by the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, a flock of European starlings litter a feedlot in Fallon, Nev. Land owners surprised to discover tens of thousands of dead birds across the high desert are criticizing the federal government over a mass killing of starlings in northern Nevada. An Agriculture Department spokesman said a pesticide was used to destroy the birds to prevent the spread of disease to dairy cows. Some area residents, however, say the government should have done more to alert the public and to dispose of the dead birds. (AP Photo/USDA APHIS, Jack Spencer) ** FILE **

How the USDA failed conservatives

After decades of transparency, why did the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) suddenly delete its database of animal welfare violations? This is raising red flags for liberals, but it is a nonpartisan issue and should be of special concern for conservatives for a variety of reasons.

Left continues its tantrum

The recent violent protest by left-wingers at the University of California, Berkeley is just another reminder of how liberal haters are just gonna hate ("Berkeley rioters betray university's historical commitment to free speech," Web, Feb. 2). A lot of decent, moral people are getting really fed up with liberal hypocrisy, self-righteousness, name-calling, bullying, prejudices and discrimination. This helps explain why Donald Trump beat Hillary Clinton.

This image released by the Sundance Institute shows Al Gore, second left, in a scene from "An Inconvenient Sequel" a film by Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk. The film is an official selection of the Documentary Premieres program at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. (Sundance Institute via AP)

An inconvenient stretcher

Bold predictions have a way of disappointing. Al Gore, whose extreme forecasts of climate catastrophe have yet to prove out, should take note. Blunders in the digital age are difficult to erase. That moving finger writes in permanent ink.

Illustration on Trump's beginnings on Obamacare repeal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Repeal and replace

Whether campaigning for Congress or actually being in control, Republicans have a tradition of overpromising and underdelivering. Expected now to deliver on their promise, made in loud and brave voice, to repeal and replace Obamacare, some of the Republicans seem determined to live up to the reputation made over the decades.

George Orwell

'1984': Making liberals great again

- The Washington Times

Are the kids finally waking up and after decades of blithe ignorance and deciding to finally educate themselves about social studies? Are they suddenly "woke" to the ancient questions such as "Who should govern?" and "Where do rights come from?"

Illustration on standards for U.S. immigration in light of Islamist terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Border disputes

Al Qaeda does not value diversity and it's not an equal opportunity employer. The same can be said of the Islamic State. And when the rulers of the Islamic Republic of Iran want to commit an act of terrorism -- the bombing of the U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut in 1983, to take just one example -- they are likely to give the assignment to members of Hezbollah, a radical Islamic group of the Shia persuasion. They are highly unlikely to recruit Unitarians, Mormons or Baha'i.

Illustration on the restoration of religious freedom in the U.S. after Obama by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Religious freedom can be restored

In its most recent "Two Minutes Hate" on President Trump, The Nation magazine's hyperbolic headline warned, "Leaked Draft of Trump's Religious Freedom Order Reveals Sweeping Plans to Legalize Discrimination." Claiming that if signed, the president's order "would create wholesale exemptions for people and organizations who claim religious objections to same sex marriage, premarital sex, abortion and trans identity, The Nation predicts that the order would "exceed the authority of executive branch," and "risk violating the Establishment Clause of the first Amendment to the Constitution."

In this photo provided by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, DNA Learning Center Assistant Director Amanda McBrien looks on as World of Enzymes camp participants set up apparatus for gel electrophoresis in Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. (Chun-hua Yang/Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory via AP)

Missouri models Wisconsin on labor reform

When Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker signed Act 10 in 2011, he did more than place taxpayers and public employees above entrenched union interests. On a personal level, that moment "started his conservative ascent," according to The New York Times, and he became the man Rush Limbaugh called "a demonstrated, genuine hero and potential star" in the Republican Party.

China and America, and the romance of history's oddest couple

Trying to understand China has been compared to gazing into jade. Cloudy and yet softly glowing, jade, in the words of the great Japanese novelist and essayist Tanizaki Junichiro, "quite lacks the brightness of a ruby or an emerald or the glitter of a diamond. But this much we can say: When we see that shadowy surface, we think how Chinese it is, we seem to find in cloudiness the accumulated sediment of the long Chinese past, we think how appropriate it is that the Chinese should admire that surface and that shadow."

Protecting the Homeland Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Border security means that entering is privilege, not a right

"Being able to come to America is a privilege, not a right," White House spokesmen Sean Spicer said at a recent news conference. Mr. Spicer defended President Trump's order that would halt Syrian refugees indefinitely, block all refugee admissions for four months and ban citizens of seven countries -- Iran, Iraq, Somalia, Syria, Sudan, Libya and Yemen -- from entering the United States for at least 90 days.

American Sattelite Technology Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Aerospace sector can make America great again

SpaceX just launched 10 Iridium Communications satellites into low-Earth orbit. These satellites will beam phone and data service to tens of thousands of Americans who live or work in areas too remote for regular cellphone coverage.