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Marine Le Pen (Associated Press)

The status quo survives in France, but in ruins

- The Washington Times

The French easily embrace contradiction and chaos. It’s what makes their politics work: “Plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose,” and they said it first: “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” The Sunday national election in France proved it again.

Unrest in Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Venezuela’s coming civil war

- The Washington Times

As American public attention has been focusing on terror attacks in Paris, the crisis in Syria and the nuclear-armed lunatic running North Korea, Venezuela to our south is about to explode into violence and civil war with incalculable consequences in our own hemisphere.

Ivanka Trump, listens as her father President Donald Trump, talks via a video conference to astronauts on the International Space Station, Monday, April 24, 2017, from the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

100 days of the GOP eating its own

- The Washington Times

It’s rounding on 100 days of the President Donald Trump administration — and surprise, surprise, it’s not just Democrats who are pointing wild fingers at the White House for this and that, for what have you and what not. criticizing, condemning and generally crying about how things are progressing. It’s Republicans, almost as much.

Illustration on the consequences of questioning current conventional wisdom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shut up and go away

Columbia University, from which I have a degree, has set aside rooms where straight white males — like me — are told they are unwelcome. How should I respond to their annual fund drives?

Illustration on the recent Paris terror attack and the French national elections by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The police vs. the PC police

As is almost always the case, signs of trouble preceded the latest shooting in Paris, which left one police officer dead and wounded two bystanders before police killed the gunman, later identified as French national Karim Cheurfi, a known criminal with a long, violent record. ISIS claimed to be behind the attack. According to police, a note praising ISIS fell out of Cheurfi’s pocket when he fell.

Better-educated Immigrants Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

One-upping Donald Trump’s crackdown on immigration

President Trump’s crackdown on immigrants committing crimes and employers abusing H-1B visas to replace qualified Americans with low-wage foreign workers may be welcome. However, those fall far short of the comprehensive reform needed to better align immigration policy with the needs of the country.

FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Antonio Reyes of Brownsville, Texas, stands by the U.S.-Mexico border fence near his home. Reyes said he's seen people scale the border fence that bisects his backyard and jump down in seconds. Sometimes they carry bales of what appear to be drugs. A higher wall is "still not going to stop them," he said. "They'll shotput it or whatever they have to do." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)

Protecting our southern border with U.S. mariners

As chairman of the Coast Guard and Maritime Subcommittee in the House of Representatives, I am proud to be an unwavering defender of the Jones Act — a critical U.S. national security law that requires vessels moving from one U.S. port to another must be U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed.

Illustration on CUFI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A boost for U.S.-Israeli ties

“An unidentified guest uses a Trump Hotel branded umbrella as she walks into the West Wing of the White House,” read the caption of an Associated Press photo in the Washington Examiner picturing an attractive young woman whose face is becoming increasingly familiar in Washington political circles.

Constitutional Change in Turkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What Turkey’s referendum reveals

The outcome of the Turkish vote on constitutional changes, notwithstanding lingering allegations of fraud, represents further evidence of a crumbling global status quo.

Catching Illegal Voters Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting the right to vote

A jury of 10 women and two men in Tarrant County, Texas, found Rosa Ortega guilty of voting illegally and sentenced her to eight years in jail.

Illustration on the Trump dollar by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s dollar

President Donald Trump’s assertion this week that the “dollar is getting too strong” led to a sharp decline in the value of the greenback.

Illustration on the true intent of the Muslim Brotherhood by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Earning its terrorist designation

In an April 11 Brookings Institution report titled “Is the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization?” senior fellow Shadi Hamid states that the Trump administration’s proposed designation of the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist group “could have significant consequences for the U.S., the Middle East, and the world.”

Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times

The famous bimbo eruptions are back (as if they had ever really gone away), and for once Bubba appears to be in the clear. No new accusations of rude behavior have been lodged against him.

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In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. Twitter users are poking fun at United's tactics in having a man removed from an overbooked Chicago to Louisville flight on April 9, 2017.  (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File) **FILE**

United Airlines and the golden age of airline deregulation

- The Washington Times

Blame Islamist terrorists and, yes, government airline deregulation for United Airlines' thuggish and bloody assault on a passenger on April 10. (Let the record show that for a decade I editorialized for deregulation and still think, within rational limits - I want a Food and Drug Administration -- the freer the markets the better for consumers and society in general.)

A European Union flag waves in the wind in front of the Chancellery in Berlin on Oct. 12, 2012. **FILE**

'Old Europe' sinks under the weight of secular progressivism

This week the existential problems facing the European Union came into stark relief as Belgium threatened Poland and Hungary with legal action if they did not agree to commit cultural suicide by letting in hundreds of thousands of "refugees" from the Middle East. This comes on the heels of Facebook-livestreamed rapes in Sweden, truck attacks in France and other Western European capitals, and jihadist bombs targeting the buses of famous soccer teams in Germany.

In this April 28, 2014, file photo, the Phoenix VA Health Care Center in Phoenix. The Veterans Affairs Department unveiled a new website Wednesday, April 12, 2107, aimed at providing information on the quality of care at VA medical centers, touting new accountability even as it grappled with fresh questions of patient safety in its beleaguered health system.  (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

Why can't we take care of our sick veterans?

- The Washington Times

A director at the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, D.C., was just removed from his post after a government watchdog blasted the facility for unsanitary conditions. But the director wasn't fired -- only demoted. And he wasn't even named in the VA's announcement of his demotion-- as if we're still trying to protect those who can't even protect our nation's most honorable.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to moderator Greta Van Susteren at the Newseum in Washington, Wednesday, April 12, 2017, during "The President and the Press: The First Amendment in the First 100 Days" forum. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Sean Spicer's humble apology a sign of good governance

- The Washington Times

The left is going batty over Sean Spicer's Hitler mishap, mocking and scoffing the White House press secretary for mistakenly stating the former Nazi leader "didn't even sink to using chemical weapons" against citizens or using "gas on his own people" the way Syria's President Bashar Assad did. But Spicer's humble rebound is commendable.

Higher Education Commissioner Joseph Rallo, center, answers questions from House budget committee members while Board of Regents Chairman Richard Lipsey, right, listens, on Wednesday, April 12, 2017, in Baton Rouge, La. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte)

The GOP's best choice for education reform

Republicans in control in Washington have to decide whether to exert themselves on a range of issues to improve the economic and social conditions for millions of Americans or merely tinker at the margins with small-potato approaches.

Perils of the Rules of Engagement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When breaking the rules of engagement is right

Donald Trump and James Mattis came to office vowing to "win" America's wars again. But unless they change our politically correct military culture, it is certain America won't.

Executing the Guily and the Innocent Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Executing the guilty and innocent

Nearly three dozen men sit on death row in Arkansas, where capital punishment has been suspended since 2005. Unless clemency is granted, seven of them -- an eighth man was granted a temporary reprieve -- will be given lethal injections all within a 10-day period, between April 17 and 27.

Illustration on the pregnancy problem in the U.S. Navy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Love Boats sail again

Women can do most things as well as men. Almost nobody any longer disputes that. Women can do some things better than men. Many women thought Donald Trump as president would be a disaster for the final female assault on the glass ceiling. It hasn't turned out quite that way, and women, such as Nikki Haley and Betsy DeVos, have been stars of his new administration.

Ownership of the AR-15 Rifle Included in the Constitution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why the Second Amendment protects the AR-15

For decades the federal judiciary has been trying to interpret the Second Amendment out of the Constitution. It is, as Sanford Levinson has termed it, an "embarrassment" to an elite class of legal scholars that finds firearms to be unusual and repulsive objects. Now the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has declared that the semi-automatic AR-15 rifle is not covered by the Second Amendment, despite that fact that is the most common rifle sold in the United States. This execrable decision is the latest outrage in a long series of disingenuous judicial contortions.

Maximizing losses

As a macroeconomics student, I agree with Richard Berman ("Minimum wage resistance," Web, March 6). The basic idea behind the minimum-wage hike is good, but there are disadvantages that come with such a law.

The sailors' revolt that influenced an election

A consensus holds that last year's politics were messy; some say the messiest ever, but A. Roger Ekirch tells us otherwise. In 1800 the run-up to the nation's "first full-blown presidential campaign" was messier, and arguably more important in its long-term consequences, though only time can tell.