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President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

A large component of the Obama administration's climate-change agenda is to restrict carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. Washington regulators set a goal of reducing CO2 emissions 30 percent by 2030, which would mostly target abundant and affordable coal-fired generation. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

Global climate policy after Lima

In his State of the Union address, President Obama again confirmed that “saving the climate” remains one of his top priorities. Yet the recently concluded confab in Lima, Peru, didn’t really conclude anything — certainly no binding protocol to limit emissions of carbon dioxide — but “kicked the can down the road” to the next international gabfest in Paris, scheduled for December.

Illustration on the impact of anti-Semitism on France by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘First they came for the Jews’

A widely distributed political cartoon by Ranan Lurie, published after the massacre of four Jews in a kosher supermarket in Paris, depicts a tiny shrub above ground and just below the surface, supporting the plant, is a web of thick twisted roots spread in the design of the swastika.

If you peered into your neighbor's bedroom with a high-tech device, you'd be prosecuted or sued.  MANDATORY CREDIT; MAGS OUT; TV OUT; INTERNET USE BY AP MEMBERS ONLY; NO SALES

Who will keep our freedoms safe?

While the Western world was watching and grieving over the slaughter in Paris last week, and my colleagues in the media were fomenting a meaningless debate about whether President Obama should have gone to Paris to participate in a televised parade, the feds took advantage of that diversion to reveal even more incursions into our liberties than we had known about.

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Atlanta Fire Chief Kelvin Cochran has been fired for authoring a Christian book in 2013 that described homosexuality as a "sexual perversion." (atlantaga.gov)

Stifling diversity in Atlanta

Liberals claim to be champions of "diversity" in all things, particularly in matters of race, ethnicity and gender (they mean "sex") and gender-bending. "Our diversity is our greatest strength," Bill Clinton, who demonstrated his embrace of diversity with the pursuit of a diversity of women in the White House, told a diversity forum last year in Phoenix.

Illegals in U.S. enrich Mexico

I hope no one is surprised that Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto so graciously offered to doctor the paperwork for millions of Mexican illegals to have the legal standing to enter the United States — without the approval of the U.S. government ("Mexican president offers Obama help with amnesty documents," Web, Jan. 6).

Gasoline Capitol Dome Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Washington’s gas tax guzzlers

Suddenly everyone in Washington wants a gas tax hike — apparently so that consumers don't save too much money at the pump. As prices keep falling, the politicians and the moochers in Washington want a piece of the action.

Liberty Censored by the FEC Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The FEC's Internet gag rule

In the time leading up to the Battles of Lexington and Concord, American patriots had, for almost a decade, gathered near the Boston Common in the shade of a majestic elm tree to share their grievances about the king's government.

AP editorializing, not reporting

In "Mayor eulogizes officer as cops outside turn backs" (Web, Jan. 4) The Associated Press shows us how not to report a story. In the very first paragraph, the story refers to the officers who turned their backs on the mayor as "repeating a stinging display of scorn for the mayor." Paragraph two starts off with "[t]he show of disrespect" and adds later that "[t]he gesture among officers added to tensions between the mayor and rank-and-file police even though he sought to quiet them."

Illustration on the need to awaken to the global Islamist threat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A warning from the Paris attacks

The Islamic terror attack on the magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris was carried out by Muslim criminals who were apparently trained in Yemen.

Republicans in Congress are rushing their own end-of-February deadline to try to halt President Obama's amnesty program. But with Mr. Obama holding veto power, it's more likely his policy gets decided in the courts, and the Texas case is one of several where the president's amnesty is under scrutiny. (Associated Press)

Flimsy facts in the economic road show

Arule sometimes attributed to 19th century British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli says there are three falsehoods used to support a weak case in government: "Lies, damned lies and statistics."

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press)

Obama should stand tall to Islam

The radical Muslims who are making war on the world are confident they can win, destroy religious and ethical beliefs and cultures different from their own, and impose a worldwide caliphate.

Jaime Rodas and his daughter, Aria Rodas 3 enjoy an afternoon of sledding on Tuesday Jan. 6, 2015 on a hill in Jim Barnett Park in Winchester, Vvaa. (AP Photo/The Winchester Star, Ginger Perry)

Rough sledding

Winter, with its ice, snow and slush, doesn't offer many rewards — unless you're a kid with a sled, or an old inner tube or a big piece of cardboard. Then you can slide toward heaven, where, if you're lucky, a big pot of hot chocolate awaits in Mom's toasty kitchen.

Reliving the life of a Seneca warrior

Jane Whitefield is unique in the annals of detective fiction. She is a throwback to a tribal world, still loyal to the beliefs of the Seneca Indians and still adhering to the call of a lost era. Thomas Perry has once again resurrected a remarkable character who seems imbued with a strange immortality and an unusual morality, and he is to be congratulated.

Federal regulations are intended to make everyone safer and healthier. But rules imposed without regard to cost can and often do inflict more pain than pleasure. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Regulating the regulators

Americans hear a welcome jingle of coins in their pockets when they pull away from the gasoline pumps, and that music might get a little louder in coming weeks. With the price at the pump now little more than $2 a gallon in most places, drivers can look forward to saving $75 billion in annual fuel costs. The open road never looked more inviting.

Korea Cyber Attack on Hollywood Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Preventing a 'cyber Pearl Harbor'

It took an attack by a nation-state on Hollywood to bring the threat of cyberattacks to the forefront of the Americans' consciousness, but we have been fighting this war for decades.

Christie Cowboys furor not news

People need to get over the fact that New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is a Cowboys fan ("Christie attends Cowboys game as guest, hugs owner," web, Jan. 5). So are people from all over the United States.

France weighs the tragic cost of appeasement

The attack on the offices and staff of the French satirical paper, Charlie Hebdo, by three heavily armed men shouting out the name of God in Arabic is nothing less than a declaration of war by hordes of heathen barbarians against the civilized world. They would want us to think that they are acting in the name of God.

ATSC standard protects consumers

In "TV digital streaming technology speeds past FCC License rule" (Web, Jan. 1) it is not clear whether op-ed writer Andrew Langer's intention is to argue for a change in law or to malign MPEG LA with incorrect and misleading information. Although the former — whether over-the-air broadcast TV services should be freely accessible through every TV set sold in the United States — may be a subject of fair debate, the latter is deceitful and irresponsible.