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(Associated Press) ** FILE **

The land of the cheerful giver

The Lord loveth a cheerful giver, as the Apostle Paul tells us, and some of the most generous givers are the most cheerful among the faithful, and they live among us in America.

Scimitar canary illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Islamic jihad comes to campus

The world is witnessing a resurgence of global anti-Semitism not seen since the 1930s and the “Final Solution.” In the Middle East, Hitler-admiring regimes like Iran, and Hitler-admiring parties like Hezbollah, Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, are openly planning to finish the job the Nazis started. Even in America, until now the most hospitable place outside of Israel for Jews, the atmosphere is more hostile than at any time in the last 70 years.

Illustration on the history of successful presidents passing a "third term" to their political successors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The odds against a presidential three-peat

Republicans looking ahead to 2016 take heart: History is on your side. For more than a century, only twice has a party held the White House for at least three consecutive presidential elections. Both times, it took each party’s greatest president of this period — Franklin Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan — to accomplished the feat. That fact should be a major concern to Democrats, who will be seeking their party’s third consecutive term on President Obama’s record.

Union attempts to organize fast food illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The $50 million question

Facing what appears to be terminal decline, the Service Employees International Union has taken to a desperate Hail Mary play to keep their bank accounts well-funded. This week SEIU and its “worker center” front groups, led by Berlin Rosen — a political consultancy with ties to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and other left-wing groups — staged various media stunts claiming to be “strikes” against fast food restaurants for higher wages.

Protecting the U.S. electrical grid illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting America in the dark

The recent temporary blackout in Washington that afflicted the White House, the Congress and interrupted a State Department press conference rightly provoked a spate of media commentary about the vulnerability of the electric grid to terrorist attack. The blackout reportedly was caused by a small explosion resulting from a malfunction in a transformer substation.

Illustration on the packaging of Hillary Clinton's candidacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The selling of the new Hillary

Joe McGinnis, a young writer who got access to the advertising agency with the Nixon account in 1968, changed the way we thought about electing presidents with his best-seller, “The Selling of the President.”

Illustration on restoring the American dream by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The exceptional thing the successful GOP candidate must say

The successful Republican candidate for president will have to be many things: fearless fighter, relentless advocate for conservative principles, articulate spokesperson for the forgotten middle class, a likable charismatic personality, expert on the complicated dynamics of foreign policy and national security strategy.

Ethnicity mask illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The transracial nation

Not long ago, The New York Times uncovered the artifact that Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush had once listed himself as “Hispanic” on a Florida voter registration form.

Illustration on Obama's killing of Americans without due process by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Can the president kill Americans?

Can the president kill you? The short answer is: yes, but not legally. Yet, President Obama has established a secret process that involves officials from the departments of Justice and Defense, the CIA, and the White House senior staff whereby candidates are proposed for execution, and the collective wisdom of the officials then recommends execution to the president, who then accepts or rejects the recommendation.

Republicans breaking campaign promises illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The wimpy GOP Congress

Last November, Americans sent a stern message to President Obama and the Democrats when they delivered Congress to the Republicans. That’s because Republicans made a lot of promises to them in the last election. Those commitments were instrumental to their victory; they were actions Americans were demanding and Republicans were vowing to deliver.

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Illustration on ISIS manipulation of the U.S. and Iran by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

ISIS in the driver’s seat

It has been argued by many analysts of the Middle East that the Islamic State, or ISIS, is less of a threat to American interests in the region than Iran. Alas, that point may be true, but what is also true is that ISIS has imperial ambitions of its own. Its influence in Syria and Iraq has been established as its army of young recruits and hardened Sunni militia veterans march across the desert sands leaving chaos and devastation in their wake.

Illustration on the need to reveal the details of the U.S. Iran nuclear deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reveal what's in the deal with Iran

President Obama has agreed to a basic framework of a deal with Iran that is supposed to prevent it from developing nuclear weapons. What details it may contain we don't yet know, and the president is apparently determined to see that neither we nor Congress will. That is unacceptable to the American people because the agreement will have a significant effect on America's national security and that of our Middle Eastern allies.

President Obama waves from Air Force One before departing Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route to Los Angeles on March 12, 2015. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Obama makes first visit to Utah as president: 'It's about time' say the locals

- The Washington Times

President Obama is bound for Utah on Thursday, his destinations include Salt Lake City and Hill Air Force Base, where he'll "deliver remarks on the economy." Details from the White House are few. The folks out that way are taking cryptic note of the visit. "Utah will become the second-to-last state the president has visited while in office. It's about time.," notes one editorial.

Illustration on the questionable integrity of some charities by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Follow the money with charitable contributions

Tax Day approaches. Americans are initiating the ritual of rummaging through file cabinets and desk drawers to find the receipt required for their deductions. And if you are one of the estimated 80 percent of Americans who donated to a charity, you may want to take a second glance at those groups to see how your money was spent. A little research on many of America's popular and virtuously named charities reveals that not all philanthropic institutions are created equal.

FILE  In this March 31, 2015 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama on Wednesday authorized a new U.S. government approach to deterring cyberattacks: financial sanctions against malicious overseas hackers and companies that knowingly benefit from the fruits of cyber espionage.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Going green with the globalists

The jolly green giant has a fan in the White House. President Obama has signed us up to salute the United Nations' climate change agenda. By pledging allegiance to the Global Climate Treaty, the president won't actually accomplish much in weather control beyond enriching the likes of Al Gore and his friends in the renewable energy industry. Playing God is just another day in the Oval Office for the spender in chief, but it requires the American taxpayer to worship with dollars at the altar of environmental extremism.

Obama's gift to Iran

President Obama and his crooked-shooting sidekick, Secretary of State John Kerry, are desperate for an agreement with Iran, placing some meaningless restrictions on Tehran's nuclear-weapons ambitions. At the outset of his "reign," Mr. Obama was also anxious to reduce our nuclear weapon stockpile to a state of nonexistence, and that is no doubt to be accomplished in some future executive order.

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser speaks Jan. 2, 2015, after taking the oath of office at the District of Columbia Mayoral Inauguration ceremony at the Convention Center in Washington. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Mayor Bowser's all-inclusive budget

Knockoffs of the State of the Union addresses are all the rage now — we're waiting for someone to make a State of the Precinct Address. Mayor Muriel Bowser delivered her first State of the District Address this week, and, following script, there was a recitation of the accolades bestowed on the nation's capital. We're cool with foodies, the tech community, the entrepreneurs and the city is in the top five cities in new construction.

U.S. skilled labor in short supply

Manufacturing has declined in the United States because the nature of manufacturing has changed. Hand labor can be and has been largely replaced by machines, and skilled labor has become even more important as a result.

Illustration on Neville Chamberlain's deal with Hitler and the historical results of appeasing tyranny by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The ghastly shadow of Munich

The Western capitulation to Adolf Hitler in the 1938 Munich Agreement is cited as classic appeasement that destroyed Czechoslovakia, backfired on France and Britain, and led to World War II.

Illustration on tragedy in the midst of Spring's renewal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When tragedy stalks the season of hope

Tragedy never takes a holiday, and the days just overflowed with fear and grief. A German airliner crashes into the French Alps, and then three buildings in the East Village of New York collapse after a basement explosion, days after a hot plate left unattended to warm food sets fire to a house in Brooklyn, and six of eight children die. Suddenly there's no room in our hearts and minds to think about political tragedy that may be playing out in the Middle East.

14-month-old Zoe Buck checks out an empty voting booth as at her mother, Julie Buck, votes at left on Nov. 4 at the Alaska Zoo polling place in Anchorage, Alaska. (Associated Press)

The mandatory voting panacea

President Obama recently suggested that mandatory voting could cure some of the ills of American democracy. Mr. Obama observed that compelling everyone to vote is one way to "encourage more participation" — perhaps the same way that the specter of prison sentences encourages more people to pay taxes. While there are many good reasons to oppose mandatory voting, compulsory balloting could help Americans recognize what their political system has become.

Will black Republicans ever be less lonely?

Frederick Douglass, the great writer, orator and abolitionist leader, was a trusted adviser to President Abraham Lincoln — and a black Republican. In an Aug. 15, 1888 letter, he famously wrote, "I recognize the Republican party as the sheet anchor of the colored man's political hopes and the ark of his safety."

Politics and the pulpit illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Indiana's religious freedom conundrum

When Indiana's state legislature approved a bill late last week that seeks to protect the free exercise of religion, churchmen may have been expected to bless the statute. But some won't go there, as it appears the legislation threatens to expose an uncomfortable wound in liberal Christianity.