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Winston Churchill, leader of the opposition in the present Parliament, shown on grounds of Chartwell, his Westerham, Kent, home on Sept. 20, 1951. (AP Photo)

Behind the sinking of the Lusitania

About how America became involved in certain wars, many conspiracy theories have been advanced — and some have been proved correct.

Julaine Appling, president of Wisconsin Family Action, right, and her organization's attorney Mike Dean, defenders of Wisconsin's state ban on gay marriage, talk to reporters after attending a hearing before the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on the challenges to Indiana and Wisconsin's gay marriage ban Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Europe stands strong for traditional definition of marriage

A court decision issued last month about same-sex marriage received almost no news coverage in the United States, yet the decision could have significant implications when the U.S. Supreme Court decides whether the Constitution requires it.

Government Control of Broadband Services Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Government broadband signals heavier public debt

The rosy picture painted by proponents of government-owned broadband, like President Obama’s Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler, couldn’t be more misleading.

Hong Kong Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hong Kong’s miraculous progress

How did this small city-state of 7.3 million people go from having a per-capita income of only a few hundred dollars per year to a per-capita income that is equal to that of the United States in only 50 years?

Labor Day Americana Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Labor Day, a misnamed holiday

No American holiday is as unusual as Labor Day. As legal holidays go, Labor Day isn’t very old.

The Left Attacking the Tea Party Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The mainstreaming of liberalism

One of the curious aspects of the Tea Party’s emergence during the past four years is the extent to which the mainstream media have fostered the idea that this political phenomenon represents a kind of radicalism.

Country Civility Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The source of civility

Even in the silence of the timeless Great Smoky Mountains, it’s nearly impossible to get away from the world’s aches and pains — not to mention horrors. The only way to do it is to unplug completely.

Chinese Threat to IT Development Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The frightening emergence of government patent trolls

When the Chinese government announced in April it was establishing a government-controlled patent-operations fund in April, there were few people besides Asian trade analysts who gave the news much attention.

Education Priorities Illustration By Donna Grethen

Transforming labor with school choice

This Labor Day, many Americans will use the holiday to wind down the summer, cook out with friends, or get a long weekend away.

Related Articles

FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2012 file photo, former Vice President Al Gore, Current TV Chairman and Co-Founder, participates in the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena , Calif. Former Vice President Al Gore is suing Al Jazeera America, saying the news network is withholding tens of millions of dollars that it owes for buying Current TV from him and other shareholders for $500 million last year. (AP Photo/Danny Moloshok, File)

EDITORIAL: Al Gore vs. Al-Jazeera

How do you say "buyer's remorse" in Arabic? The Qatari royal family likely feels the pangs of regret for paying the princely sum of $500 million to Al Gore and friends to give Al-Jazeera America a slot on satellite-TV and cable channels.

CORRECTS DATE - President Barack Obama, right, smiles as he and former NBA basketball player Alonzo Mourning, left, prepare to ride in a golf cart while golfing at Vineyard Golf Club in Edgartown, Mass., on the island of Martha's Vineyard, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014. Obama is taking a two-week summer vacation on the island. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

The Obama tee party

Trouble in the St. Louis suburbs has rescued President Obama's vacation. He can play all 18 holes at the country club now, safe in the knowledge that he's distracting voters from all the scandals, mismanagement and foreign and domestic policies that are the legacy of his administration.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Russian Roulette'

In November 1917, soon after his Bolshevik faction seized control of Russia, Lenin called on the "oppressed masses" of Asia to follow Russia's example and throw off colonial rule.

Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol is surrounded by media after meeting with protesters Monday, Aug. 18, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer has touched off rancorous protests in Ferguson, a St. Louis suburb where police have used riot gear and tear gas. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Media mantra misses the story as Ferguson explodes

Much of the media mantra in Ferguson, Missouri, followed a simple storyline. An 18-year-old black, known to his friends and family as a "gentle giant," planned to attend college the following week. As he walked down the street with his friend around noon Saturday, Aug. 9, he met a police officer who gunned him down as he tried to surrender with his hands held high.

Expensive Government Music Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A higher scale for music royalties?

Members of Congress are being pressured by lobbyists, songwriters and music-publishing executives to pass legislation artificially forcing copyright royalty rate increases on music.

Bogart and Bacall in "To Have and Have Not."

'Death be not proud'

Robin Williams and Lauren Bacall join this year's roster of celebrity deaths. Their names and fame preoccupy us in public mourning, though most of us were no closer to them in life than to a movie or television screen.

NATO Alliance Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

As NATO withers, whither NATO?

As world leaders gather for the NATO summit in Wales during the first week of September, they'll need to do some collective soul-searching on the alliance's future.

Tough Pill to Swallow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to slow the pace of medical progress

The Americans infected with the Ebola virus appear to be improving — very welcome news, especially given the virus's death rate, which is estimated to be as high 90 percent.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Zhivago Affair'

During the 1950s, the American and Soviet governments agreed on very little, but they shared a charming faith in the power of literature — novels especially — to influence the hearts and minds of readers.

A dead youth and a wounded community

The languorous dog days of August were shattered by the recent tragic shooting death of an unarmed black teenager in a St. Louis suburb.