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Illustration on the removal of Chuck Hagel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dumping Hagel at Defense

The abrupt resignation of Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has a few important facts behind it, but it is probably tied to a shift in President Obama’s strategy in Afghanistan.

President Barack Obama, left, reaches over to touch Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, left, following an announcement of Hagel's resignation during an event in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. Hagel is stepping down under pressure from Obama's Cabinet, senior administration officials said Monday, following a tenure in which he has struggled to break through the White House's insular foreign policy team. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

What Hagel’s exit means

Chuck Hagel’s decision signified only one thing: Barack Obama no longer enjoys the confidence of the American military establishment.

Congress Wields the Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Restoring regular order on Capitol Hill

So long as they do not overplay their hand, Republicans in the U.S. House and Senate have been given a wonderful opportunity to significantly pare the federal budget and shape U.S. policy in the last two years of the Obama administration.

Illustration on the effects of Obama's illegal alien order on the African American population by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How about putting Americans first?

The framers of the Constitution sought to limit the power of government and expand individual liberty. President Obama sees it the other way. Whether he violated the constitutional limits of his power will be debated and possibly decided in the courts and by the new Republican majority in Congress, but there is another issue surrounding the amnesty order that needs addressing.

Illustration on further Union intrusion on McDonald's and other franchises by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Going overboard at the labor board

Whom do you work for? Such a simple question should not require a government agency to give an answer. However, the Obama administration, in its never-ending quest for power over individuals and businesses, has decided that it — rather than you or your employer — should determine whom you work for.

Apollo 11 begins the return trip to earth. Source: NASA

Getting on with getting to Mars

Forty-five years ago last summer, Neil Armstrong and I walked on the moon. Our Apollo 11 lander touched down in the moon’s “Sea of Tranquility,” and three days later we were home.

House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dreaded consequences of Obamanomics

What has been the price tag for the audacious Obamanomics experiment? How much has it all cost — the bailouts, the debt, the stimulus plans, the printing of cheap money, Obamacare and all the rest?

(AP Photo/Isaac Brekken, File)

Obama’s immigration order regresses America

As President Obama with a single order created what he hopes will be an eventual new electorate via millions of illegal aliens, he did not break new ground; he put America on very old and dangerous ground: government by decree.

Liberal Bully of the Week: Emperor Obama

To quote the band Styx from the classic 1977 song “Come Sail Away”: “I tried Oh Lord I tried to carry on …” to not give the “Bully Award” to Barack Obama once again. However, I had no choice. President Obama has taken bullying to a whole new level not seen since maybe Hugo Chavez (another liberal darling).

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Obamacare Chain Logo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

EDITORIAL: Jonathan Gruber's payday

The MIT economist who is the brains behind Obamacare says he was willing to say and do whatever it took to advance the scheme, and now it's clear why. Obamacare made Mr. Gruber a multimillionaire, and at the expense of the taxpayers.

Dodd-Frank Shakey Bank Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The end of Dodd-Frank?

After health care, the administration commonly lists financial reform, the Dodd-Frank Act, as one of its signature achievements. Do the election results signal the end of Dodd-Frank?

Illustration on government interference with Medicare prescription drug coverage by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Big Pharma's prescription-drug monopoly

Thank God the government doesn't run the cellphone industry. If it did, phones would cost twice as much, be too heavy to carry, have rotary dials on them, and we'd still be paying for "roaming" minutes.

Sen. Mary L. Landrieu has called for a vote on Keystone XL. (Associated Press)

Obama's policies fall like dominoes

After the thrashing Barack Obama and his party got in last week's elections, it is now clear that the Democrats are leaderless and in disarray, and he is no longer relevant in the domestic-policy battles of his last two years in office.

Israeli Flavored Swiss Cheese Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Sweden's wishful thinking on the Mideast

Our affable but pointed discussion focused on the Middle East, on which we agreed on almost nothing. I might as well have been in Sudan's or Syria's foreign ministry.

Illustration on Obama's ineffectual action against ISIS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Calling to account Obama's ISIS war

It probably won't be, but the first item on the lame-duck congressional agenda should be the military action in which we are now engaged against the Islamic State, or ISIS.

Democratic candidate for Texas Governor Sen. Wendy Davis poses with members of Planned Parenthood as she rallies campaign workers and supporters at the party's west side office in San Antonio, Texas, Monday, Nov. 3, 2014. Davis is running against Republican candidate Greg Abbott. (AP Photo/San Antonio Express-News, Jerry Lara)

EDITORIAL: With her epic fail, Wendy Davis painted Texas redder

The Democratic dream of "turning Texas blue" dissolved on Nov. 4. The left had elevated Wendy Davis, an obscure state senator, to superstar status after she delivered an 11-hour panegyric to abortion. She was expected to ride her celebrity status into the executive mansion in Austin. It didn't quite work out that way.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Augustus: First Emperor of Rome'

Caesar Augustus remains the person in the ancient world whose image is the most recognizable, surviving to the present day in statues, coins and frescoes. He was the Barack Obama of his day, except that he actually created significant and lasting accomplishments.

Miteb bin Abdullah Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Saudi prince who could be king

Ever since President Franklin Roosevelt met with King Abdulaziz aboard the USS Quincy in 1945, Saudi Arabia has been one of America's most steadfast allies.