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Supporting the Gold Standard Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Liberty and wealth require sound money

Conservatives hold that wealth and liberty correlate. This proposition was self-evident in the context of the Cold War and remains true today.

Illustration by Clement, National Post, Toronto, Canada

Bomb or occupy — or neither?

Wars usually end only when the defeated aggressor thinks it would be futile to resume the conflict. Lasting peace follows if the loser is then forced to change its political system into something other than what it was.

Illustration on options dealing with the Islamic State by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How to play the ISIS card

The Islamic State, Islamic quasi-state that has conquered parts of Iraq and Syria, has threatened America with terrorist attacks and drawn us back into an Iraq war.

Illustration on Ayaan Hirsi Ali speaking at Yale by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

God, woman and free speech at Yale

When Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the brave human-rights activist and a native of Somalia, spoke at Yale last week, 300 students turned out to listen. Others were turned away because security was so tight. The sponsors were almost apologetic because there was no controversy.

James Clapper          T.J. Kirkpatrick/The Washington Times

Throwing Clapper under the bus

When President Obama attributed the rise in Iraq of the Islamic State, or ISIS, to the failures of the U.S. intelligence community earlier this week, naming and blaming directly National Intelligence Director James R. Clapper, he was attempting to deflect criticism of his own incompetence.

Secretary of State John Kerry, center, and US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power, left, listen as President Barack Obama speaks during a bilateral meeting to discuss the Ebola epidemic with Ethiopian President Hailemariam Desalegn, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A coherent strategy for the Middle East

The latest strategy put forth by the Obama administration to combat the Islamic State jihadists not only changes weekly, but fails to address U.S. strategic core objectives in the Middle East. Most dubious is its reliance on so-called “moderate rebels” to provide a ground component to a U.S. air campaign.

Illustration on the damage being done by Obamacare by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Obamacare, one year later

As a doctor and congressman, I’m often asked what I prefer to be called. The answer for me is always doctor.

Illustration on U.S. reinvolvement against ISIS by Schot/De Volkskrant, Amsterdam, Netherlands

A Mideast policy rewritten in blood

The two most critical rules of warfare are to never tell your enemy what you will not do and to never be seen as a reluctant, vacillating warrior.

Illustration on Netanyahu's comment that ISIS and Hamas "are branches on the same poisonous tree" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The irony of endorsing Palestinians while bombing ISIS

Speaking to the United Nations General Assembly on Monday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu responded strongly to an earlier verbal attack launched by Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas.

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Illustration on the need for ground troops by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The error of relying on air power

It is the 21st-century version of the classic question once posed by The Eagles. So who you gonna' believe: President Obama or your lyin' eyes?

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Liar's Wife'

The artful relationships among the four novellas collected in Mary Gordon's "The Liar's Wife" make this volume way more than the sum of its parts.

Illustration on the failures of tne war on poverty by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

The War on Poverty: 50 years of failure

In January 1964, President Johnson declared "unconditional war on poverty in America." Since then, the taxpayers have spent $22 trillion on Johnson's war.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Clapper's off-target intelligence strategy

Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper has just released a new National Intelligence Strategy, the first in five years. It's a highly unsatisfying read for two reasons.

Illustration on potential deadly effects of media language misuse by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

It's not execution, but murder

News media conflation of murder with execution has become deadly — to journalistic standards of accuracy.

Illustration on U.S. China relations by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Russia and China, masters of mischief

The international security meeting in Paris on Monday showcased a world in fear of the growing threat that the Islamic State poses to the global order.

Illustration on faulty global warming science by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Boycotting the U.N. climate summit

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has sensibly declined to attend yet another climate summit — this time called by Ban Ki-moon for Tuesday in New York under the auspices of the United Nations.

Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio was one of three Republicans that voted to end his party's filibuster of the energy efficiency bill. Mr. Portman, who co-sponsored the bill, called its defeat "yet another disappointing example of Washington's dysfunction."

The GOP's youthful Maverick PAC set to host Portman, Cruz, Priebus

- The Washington Times

The term "maverick" used to belong to Sen. John McCain back in the day. Now it's been expanded to represent a growing batallion of young, aggressive Republicans and conservatives who are ready to rumble, and in touch with their inner maverick, or words to that effect. Founded in 2009, Maverick PAC - or MAVPAC - now boasts 2,500 members. The group gathers Friday in the nation's capital for an annual conference that has attracted a stellar line-up of speakers.

FILE - In this Nov. 23, 2011 file photo, an American flag flies from the U.S. Capitol in Washington. The federal government ran a lower budget deficit in August 2014 than a year ago, remaining on track to record the lowest deficit for the entire year since 2008. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

It's not for frugal: Half of the U.S. Senate gets an F in 'fiscal performance'

- The Washington Times

Alas, almost half of the U.S. Senate has earned an F grade in "fiscal performance" according to the National Taxpayers Union's 35th annual rating of Congress. Indeed, 45 senators received the rock bottom grade on the scorecard, which analyzes their responses to every single roll call vote affecting federal taxes, spending, debt and significant regulations.