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Rosa Luxemburg (Associated Press)

Black Lives Matter and the endless war against the Jews

- The Washington Times

The man who controls the language controls the conversation, as George Orwell rightly observed. The word that the left is trying, with a certain success, to appropriate now is “genocide.” Genocide is what Hitler set out to do, to exterminate Europe’s Jews (and who knows where his evil ambition would have gone from there).

Federal Mismanagement of the Peanut Industry Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Politicians and peanut pilfering

The history of federal peanut policy is the perfect antidote to anyone who still believes that Congress could competently manage a lemonade stand. Federal spending for peanut subsidies will rise eight-fold between last year and next year — reaching almost a billion dollars and approaching the total value of the peanut harvest. This debacle is only the latest pratfall in a long history of horrendous federal mismanagement.

Hillary at the helm

- The Washington Times

”At long last,” she thinks. “My time has come. They’re now all here, fighting for me.”

Texas Bullet Train Project Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How private enterprise drives the trains

Texans are turning the tables on how to pay for nationally critical infrastructure projects, leading the way with a high-speed train project that relies on the expertise of private entrepreneurs instead of government money.

Law Enforcement at the Border Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Immigration reform must start with border enforcement

As a veteran border patrol officer, I can say without any reservations that our immigration system is completely dysfunctional. Immigrants permitted to come to the United States have a cumbersome and expensive time doing so. Those who aren’t permitted to enter waltz across the border by the tens of thousands, and those not allowed to remain here elude deportations, even after committing serious crimes against our citizens.

Palestinian Hamas supporters hold up their hands while chanting Islamic slogans as masked members from the Izzedine al-Qassam Brigades, a military wing of Hamas, march with their weapons on vehicles during a rally a long the street of Rafah refugee camp, Gaza Strip, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

The next round of Hamas vs. Israel

Words can bewitch. Soon, the seemingly benign phrase “cycle of violence,” will be applied once again to the Hamas-Israel conflict. The linguistic effect of this application will be to equate terrorism and counterterrorism, further blurring the always-essential distinction between international crime and international law enforcement.

Elmar Abdullayev, 55, stands at a gates of his home hit by shelling in a village of Gapinli, in Terter region of Azerbaijan on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. Azerbaijan and separatist forces in Nagorno-Karabakhk on Tuesday agreed on a cease-fire starting noon local time following three days of the heaviest fighting in the disputed region since 1994, the Azeri defense ministry announced. Gapanli, a village south of Terter, has been one of the hardest hit. Houses bear the marks of the recent shelling; metal doors are riddled with shrapnel, power lines are cut down, craters are seen in the yards. (AP Photo/ Hicran Babayev)

An ‘unfrozen’ conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh

Recently, one of Vladimir Putin’s foreign policy functionaries made another outrageous statement on the status of the Azerbaijani region of Nagorno-Karabakh. Evgeniy Satanovsky, the head of Russian Institute of the Near East, visited the separatist region (in contravention of international law) in mid-June and declared: “As I understand it, the issue that Karabakh is part of Azerbaijan, in terms of military logic and from the standpoint of practical politics is completely closed.”

Safety of Chromium-6 Levels in North Carolina Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Exaggerating chromium risks

Constant claims, counterclaims and accusations about coal ash contaminating surface and underground water are making North Carolinians feel like they’re watching a fast-paced tennis match. Even people with chemistry degrees must feel bewildered by assertions that parts per million or billion of chromium-6 may cause cancer.

Growing the Movement with Hate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s hypocritical anti-Semitism

In its new platform, Black Lives Matter (BLM) has, despite the total lack of relevance to its own agenda or interests, thrown whatever heft it has behind the anti-Semitic movement to Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (BDS) Israel. In doing so, it is inarguably contributing to the campaign to “other” the world’s only Jewish state and, with it, the Jews themselves.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press)

Virginia’s McAuliffe is for losers

All the fuss about Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe trying to restore voting rights to felons who have served their sentences is just fuss, nothing more. To be sure, it appears at first glance that the chief executive of the Old Dominion is really concerned about civil rights for the downtrodden.

Terrorists Present in the U.S. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No plan to stop foreign-born terrorists

For decades, foreign-born Islamic terrorists have been exploiting our immigration system. Almost every type of immigration has been exploited by terrorists, from temporary legal immigration to illegal immigration to humanitarian immigration.

Overheated concern about July’s warmth

Mainstream media report that July was the “hottest” month since 1880 (or as CNN wrongly reported, “ever”). And future Julys will only become hotter.

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Russia-Turkey Relations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Dealing in deception

Autocracies and other despotisms are notoriously unfaithful to their obligations under international agreements.

A race closer than it looks

Despite Donald Trump's disastrous post-convention performance, the presidential race is closer than it appears. While polls show he has decidedly and deservedly lost ground to Hillary Clinton, they tell only half the story. The other half is turnout. Looking at both, it becomes clear why Mrs. Clinton wants this race over before Nov. 8.

How togas and bikinis meet in California

Classic movie sets apart, California, that byword for the cutting-edge trendsetting contemporary in so many spheres, and the world of ancient Greece and the Roman Empire would seem to have little in common.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Kissimmee, Fla., Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. (Loren Elliott/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Trump's trump card may be his view on America

- The Washington Times

Although Donald Trump is trailing Hillary Clinton in most head-to-head matchups and is getting berated by the media and GOP establishment on a daily basis, one statistic is holding true: Americans feel he has a better sense of what's happening in the world than Mrs. Clinton.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks a group of pastors at the Orlando Convention Center, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Moving closer to 'Clexit'

First there was Brexit, when Great Britain shook up the global establishment by following through on a dare to exit the European Union. Now a movement is building that would further stun the supranationalists: an exit from the United Nations climate change protocol, dubbed "Clexit." (Not very imaginative, but sloganeers are rarely original.)

Illustration on biased journalism's impact on liberty by Linas Garys/the Washington Times

Journalism's double standard

Every time a David Duke or some other marginal Klan-connected or neo-Nazi lowlife crawls out from under a rock and gratuitously endorses Donald Trump (or anyone else, particularly a Republican or a conservative), the mainstream media call breathless attention to the news. They further demand that Mr. Trump or the other endorsee renounce the unsolicited and unwanted endorsement.

Who's unfit for leadership?

So 50 Republican officials think Donald Trump is not fit to be president. I didn't see a letter from them regarding Hillary Clinton's and Barack Obama's fitness, so I presume these lofty, high-minded civil servants believe both of those folks are just fine.

Hillary Clinton took pages from Mr. Obama's economic plans, echoing his calls for an infrastructure bank and a clean energy surge. (Associated Press)

Hillary's stale economics

It's too bad that Ronald Reagan is not around today to say, "Well, there she goes again." Hillary Clinton's much-anticipated economic policy speech was full of fluffy rhetoric, stale proposals for rebuilding the middle class that Barack Obama peddled eight years ago. Those were the ideas that tanked the middle class.

Government out of whack

The wheels of our three branches of government are enormously out of balance. The judicial branch decides that health insurance premiums are taxes, the executive branch legislates via executive order, the legislative branch writes laws, and government agencies take charge.

Jacob Zuma Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Of arms and the man named Zuma

- The Washington Times

I first met Jacob Zuma, South Africa's controversial president, in 2002 when he was serving as then-President Thabo Mbeki's vice president. I was in South Africa at the behest of a number of South African outfitters and professional hunters to urge the government to reject a British-inspired laundry list of firearms regulations that would have crippled big-game hunting in South Africa.

BOOK REVIEW: 'This Must be the Place'

We've all said, "This must be the place," after being frustrated by the hassles of finding our way somewhere. Perhaps the directions have been poor, or the map less than useful. And with all the effort expended, it's still not entirely certain that this really is the place: It's more that other possibilities have been excluded.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gives a speech on the economy after touring Futuramic Tool & Engineering, in Warren, Mich., Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

When a presidential race rages out of control

- The Washington Times

It's the conceit of every generation that horses have never been faster, whisky has never been older, beautiful women have never been younger — and politics have never been rowdier. But maybe our generation has a legitimate claim.