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Demonstrators sharing opposing views argue during a rally Thursday, April 27, 2017, in Berkeley, Calif. Demonstrators gathered near the University of California, Berkeley campus amid a strong police presence and rallied to show support for free speech and condemn the views of Ann Coulter and her supporters. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Spooked by the power of words, words, words

- The Washington Times

The only thing anyone is allowed to hear on campus is a slogan. Thinking is so 20th century (and early 20th century at that). The adults paid to be in charge have retreated to a safe place, where never is heard an encouraging word and the skies are cloudy all day.

Illustration on fixing the net neutrality law by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Controlling the nation’s internet

Do you remember the last time you had an issue with your internet connection and the federal government cheerfully helped you resolve it? Me neither. Yet the same federal government who spent $2 billion on a website that was more likely to dish out electric shocks than work properly is now literally in control of our nation’s internet, under the false rubric of promoting “net neutrality.”

Immoral Illegal Drugs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why buying illegal drugs is immoral

Purchasing illegal drugs is an immoral act, regardless of where one stands in the legalization debate. When drugs are legally prohibited, criminal organizations assume control of production and distribution, making violence inherent in the process. Drug proceeds are used to fund criminal and terrorist organizations, enabling them to murder innocent people, attack police and military, bleed our tax dollars, and destroy the rule of law.

Illustration on gun control debate by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Challenging inaccurate information about guns

When you receive glowing media attention and have hundreds of millions of dollars to spend, you don’t really have to debate. Michael Bloomberg just announced last week that he would be putting $25 million into next year’s House and Senate races. From 2013 to 2016, he donated $48 million toward congressional races. By contrast, the NRA contributed a measly $2.1 million. And Mr. Bloomberg spent about 85 percent more on lobbying, more on television advertising, and much more for state and local political races.

Illustration on the Clinton campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Hillary doomed her ‘inevitable presidency’

While we’re examining the accomplishments of Donald Trump’s first 100 days — putting his man on the U.S. Supreme Court is the biggie — Hillary Clinton is getting the once-over (and the second and third) for all the reasons why she’s not the first woman to preside over her own first 100 days in the Oval Office.

Illustration on the Trump White House decision to broaden media access by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Talking right

President Trump did something Monday I have long advocated. He met with a small group of conservative journalists, pundits and radio talk show hosts. I was among them.

This May 23, 2016, file photo, shows the northernmost boundary of the proposed Bears Ears region, along the Colorado River, in southeastern Utah. Western Democrats are pressuring President Donald Trump not to rescind land protections put in place by President Barack Obama, including Utah's Bears Ears National Monument. Obama infuriated Utah Republicans when he created the monument on 1.3 million acres of land that is sacred to Native Americans. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)

Go, Trump, go — pare back the national monuments

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump is taking aim at some of Barack Obama’s national monuments, as well as at designations made by other presidents. And this is great news. Terrific news. When it comes to the country’s national monuments, this White House’s attitude should be one of slash and burn — not conserve and preserve.

Illustration on the dangerous complications of the Obama/Iran nuke deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tangled in Obama’s Iran nuclear trap

On April 18, the State Department certified Iran to be in compliance with its commitments under the Iran nuclear deal (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA). As France’s iconic foreign minister, the Marquis de Talleyrand, once reportedly said: “This was worse than a crime; it was a mistake.”

Illustration on the sources of Trump's ideas by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The anatomy of a Trump decision

When Donald Trump’s Florida lawyer Paul Rampell first proposed turning the future president’s Mar-a-Lago estate into a private club, Mr. Trump pronounced the idea “dumb.” Over the next month, Messrs. Rampell and Trump argued back and forth about the idea until Mr. Trump finally agreed with Mr. Rampell.

DAY 40 - In this Feb. 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., gestures on Capitol Hill in Washington, before his address to a joint session of Congress. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, file)

Ending the threats of a government shutdown

We are looking at another potential federal government shutdown this week. The high drama over passing a budget, passing spending bills under regular order, and the lifting of the debt ceiling has gone on for far too many years.

Illustration on a possible replay of 1927 for the Democrat party in 2020 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Will 2020 be another 1972 for Democrats?

The year 1968 was a tumultuous one that saw the assassinations of rival candidate Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. Lyndon Johnson’s unpopular lame-duck Democratic administration imploded due to massive protests against the Vietnam War.

Democrats can’t chart their way forward in this wilderness

Like most minority parties that lose the White House, the Democratic Party is without a national leader. Their legislative caucuses in the House and Senate have elected leadership, but the party itself has several elected officials fighting to lead it into the future, all with an eye toward 2020. And the party’s most visible figures aren’t exactly fresh faces.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gives an acceptance speech after accepting the Trailblazer Award during the LGBT Community Center Dinner at Cipriani Wall Street on Thursday, April 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen) ** FILE **

The Democratic Party’s ‘Gong Show’

Finally, the Democrats admit it wasn’t the Russians, James B. Comey or sexism that brought Hillary Clinton down. We are now told by journalists, leading Democrats, and even a former Democratic presidential candidate, that it was the inept dysfunction of the party itself, Hillary, and her abused and frightened team that has reduced them all to irrelevant, vapid political busybodies.

Related Articles

Give states back their land

In his otherwise excellent article on federal land grabs ("A monumental issue in Maine," B3, April 17), Robert Knight fails to mention why Washington is able to get away with this.

How to sway North Korea

President Trump has pointed out the strong linkage between China and North Korea, and he correctly assumes China can influence North Korea's weapons-development program. We must work with China to resolve this situation, the Chinese encroachment in the South China Sea and the trade-deficit imbalance.

'Snowflake' schools prepare no one

How ironic was The Washington Times' juxtaposition of two articles in yesterday's edition ("The Halls of Ivy," Inside the Beltway; "Trump to Use Executive Order to Push 'Hire American,'"). Maybe when universities like Arizona State start offering, teaching and testing students on courses that actually prepare them for a future in the work world instead of wasting parents' and taxpayers' money on country-club living with a side helping of "snowflake" protection, perhaps then the H-1B visa program will become extinct. If I were the CEO of a company looking to hire people with the skill sets needed to improve my business, these students would be at the bottom of my list.

Supporters of the 'no' vote, chant slogans during a protest against the referendum outcome, on the Aegean Sea city of Izmir, Turkey, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. Turkey's main opposition party has filed a formal request seeking Sunday's referendum to be annulled because of voting irregularities. (AP Photo/Emre Tazegul)

Cooking Turkey's goose

Turkey has been bumping along on the ragged margins of democracy for years. With this week's slim approval of a governmental reform referendum, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has proclaimed that the nation can "change gears and continue along our course more quickly."

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May walks out of 10 Downing Street to speak to the media in London, Tuesday April 18, 2017. British Prime Minister Theresa May announced she will seek early election on June 8 (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

Theresa May's gamble

Theresa May showed herself Tuesday to be a bit of a gambler, but only a bit. Armed with public-opinion polls revealing an unusual opportunity to trade a sure thing for a better thing, she stunned Britain, surprised Europe and fascinated Washington by calling for new parliamentary elections on June 8.

Bill O'Reilly

Bill O'Reilly -- good riddance to bad rubbish

With Bill O'Reilly, so many shoes have dropped that he's looking like Imelda Marcos. Just two weeks ago, The New York Times reported that Fox paid out $13 million to five women who accused the bombastic bloviator of sexual harassment. Mr. O'Reilly told The Times that he settled only to avoid hurting his family.

Women look at video of Syria Charity presentation inside an exhibition hall at the France Muslim Annual Fair in Le Bourget, north of Paris, in this Saturday, April 15, 2017, file photo. Tens of thousands of Muslims are expected at the three-day event this weekend organized by the ultra-conservative Union of Islamic Organizations of France. It includes merchant stalls, Koran readings, prayers and speeches by leading Muslim figures as Muslims of France want to make sure their voices are heard in France's presidential elections. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

The Islam clash in America

- The Washington Times

The arrest and charge of an Indian woman, Jumana Fakhruddin Nagarwala, for performing female genital mutilation on two young girls in Michigan, brings front and center the question of whether certain religions are compatible with America's Constitution. Certain religions -- ha. Let's be blunt here. We're talking about Islam.

Illustration on the diminishing returns of the $15 minimum wage quest by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A story of union waste

Lost in the shuffle of health care debates and Syrian airstrikes, America's most boisterous union recently released its 2016 financials. The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) -- the catalyst of the Fight for $15 and a Union campaign -- reveals exactly how union bosses spent member dues money last year.

Illustration on difficulties with tax cuts by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Trump's taxing problems

Donald Trump won the presidency in significant measure on a promise to deliver more robust growth and better jobs. As things stand, his efforts and GOP prospects for the midterm elections will importantly hinge on accomplishing tax reforms that encourage more investment.

Illustration on the wonders of incentivization by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In praise of the price system

Kinder and gentler governments use market-based price incentives and less coercion. But all too many government officials forget about the superiority of the price system, and resort to the threat of or actual violence to get the people to do what they want. Business people use the price system to attract customers with lower prices and good employees by offering higher wages (the price of work) rather than coercion.

President Donald Trump holds up a pen he used to sign one of various bills in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Monday, March 27, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo file photo)

Obstructions to tax simplicity

Thanks to the beneficence of the federal government (and the calendar), we Americans have until midnight on April 18 to file our income taxes. It's too bad filing taxes wasn't an easier process.

Russian Iskander Missiles in Armenia Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Nuclear trouble in Azerbaijan

The Caucasus Mountains that run between the Black and Caspian Seas could soon turn into a nuclear flash point because of dangerous saber-rattling by Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan.