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Illustration on Obama's undermining of the U.S. military by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Undermining the military

When President Obama announced that he was going to “fundamentally transform” America, not many Americans understood the full depth of that statement. Based on an assessment of his policies over the last six and half years, clearly one of Mr. Obama’s objectives has been to diminish America’s standing and leadership role throughout the world. One result has been that our allies now don’t trust us and our enemies don’t fear us — the worst possible combination.

President Johnson signs Medicare legislation July 30, 1965.                Associated Press photo

Medicare at age 50

Diehard defenders of President Obama’s continuing, wretched rollout of the Affordable Care Act may be quick to point out that other government programs, most notably Medicare, also had rocky starts. But the historical record doesn’t support such nonsense.

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

Peace Through Strength Bunker Bomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Reviving ‘peace through strength’

Ever since the Ayatollah Khomeini and his Islamist storm troops took over Iran in 1979, the driving force of the country’s rulers has been (1) destroy Israel; (2) establish Iran as the hegemonist of the Middle East; and (3) drive out all Western influences from the region. Their efforts to create a nuclear arsenal has been part of their strategy to accomplish these goals.

Illustration on the controversy stirred during the creation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Surviving ‘a perfect storm’ of opposition

Just two months ago, the nation marked the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, and many of the stories in the media were illustrated with images of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Mall, which over the past three decades has become an American cultural icon — symbolizing that difficult period in our history. Yet, that memorial, as we know it today, almost didn’t happen.

Pinocchio (Associated Press)

When the Big Lie becomes the legacy

- The Washington Times

Maybe the Christian thing to do is to cut John Kerry a little slack. He hit his head harder than the doctor thought when he fell off his bicycle in Switzerland.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump    Illustration by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Let Trump be Trump

Politics — and politicians in a democracy — are a true reflection of society’s virtues and faults at a given window in time.

Illustration on the dominance of the U.N in the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fantasists, bumblers and Iran

First the Obama administration denied that any secret side deals were made when they negotiated the agreement that they insist us will prevent Iran from producing and deploying nuclear weapons. Secretary of State Kerry assured us that it was a “fantasy” to believe there could have been a better deal, and the president said the only alternative is war.

Alternative delegate from Jean, La., Billy Durnley wears a large elephant buckle at the Republican National Convention, Tampa, Fla., Tuesday, August 28, 2012. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Creating a case for conservatism

Being conservative in a politically correct culture has never been easy. Whether you’re a politician trying to explain a controversial sound-bite, or a voter attempting to defend your stance on a hot-button issue to co-workers, you either grow a thick skin — or learn to keep quiet.

Illustration on ending taxpayer funding of Planned Parenthood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The moral terrorism of Planned Parenthood

Like many of you, when I first heard the undercover video of a Planned Parenthood official discussing in a detached and macabre manner the selling of aborted baby parts, I was physically sickened.

Illustration on the Obama Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Peace for our time’

Banner headlines in a prominent national newspaper read “NUKE DEAL PAVES WAY FOR NEW ERA: Sworn Foes U.S., Iran Aim To Bury Hatchet” — without sarcasm. For critics of the Iran nuclear deal, such undeserved praise is ominously reminiscent of the adulatory press that greeted British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and his ill-fated Munich agreement, upon returning from meeting Adolph Hitler in Nazi Germany on the eve of World War II, declaring, “Peace for our time.”

Related Articles

Don't use 'Nazi' lightly

"Hungary's Viktor Orban antagonizes European Union with border fence, Russia embrace" (Web, July 2) unfortunately presents a narrative of Hungary that is as compact and simple as it is false. Everyone has a right to his or her own opinion, however misinformed, but the article contains a very grave statement from Princeton Prof. Kim Lane Scheppele, who is quoted as saying, "Orban is always in danger of losing support to the Nazi Party, so he is out-Nazi-ing the Nazis."

President Barack Obama talks with the Joint Chiefs of Staff following a meeting in the Situation Room of the White House, Oct. 28, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Obama and his generals

Secretary of State John Kerry is exactly the mandarin that George Wallace was talking about when he warned about bureaucrats "who can't park a bicycle straight." Mr. Kerry can't ride one, either, and has the bruises to prove it. He's in Lausanne now, polishing the last concessions President Obama is determined to make to enable the Iranians to protect their path to the Islamic bomb. Mr. Obama wants the deal to be the foreign-policy legacy of his eight years in the White House. He need not fear.

Hillary's practiced deceptions

The idea that telling a lie in Washington is somehow shameful was probably born with the fabricated tale of little George, his hatchet and his father's favorite cherry tree at Mount Vernon. Lies are to Washington what cars once were to Detroit. In our own time Bonnie and Clod have made deceivers fashionable, demonstrating that speaking in fable is no dishonor.

A redesigned American flag. (The Washington Times)

The summer the nation went mad

- The Washington Times

We'll remember this as the summer the nation went mad. Lynch mobs are usually brought to the boil by a heinous event, encouraged by heat, humidity and harangue. There was a heinous event, now all but forgotten, but this is hardly a long, hot summer. There's a drought in Southern California but June and July have been moderate and pleasant, with considerable rain, nearly everywhere else. Nevertheless, a lynch mob with tar, feathers, rails and ropes has been on the scout for somebody to harass, hurt or hang.

Former President Ronald Reagan. (Associated Press)

Reagan's tax-cutting legacy

President Reagan had a gift for proving his critics wrong. Almost none of the leading economists of the late 1970s thought that his supply-side, tax-cutting agenda, along with stable monetary policy and deregulation, could revive the U.S. economy.

Sanchez Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No sanctuary from the law

According to The Wall Street Journal, the last serious attempt to count the number of federal criminal laws appears to have been made in 1982 by a retired Justice Department official named Ronald Gainer. He failed, but the estimate then was "50 titles and 23,000 pages of federal law." Many more laws have been added since then.

Changing Course with Russia Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Team Reagan versus Obama and Congress

The current White House and U.S. media narrative on the conflict in Ukraine differ significantly from what one hears in Moscow, as one might expect. President Obama and others in the United States point to Moscow as the sole culprit and it goes something like this: Vladimir Putin annexed the Crimea, invaded Ukraine and is now threatening the Baltics, Poland and perhaps other countries "in pursuit of a wrongheaded desire to recreate the glories of the Soviet empire."

Bitcoin Bites Big Brother Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Immutable money

What is money? The coin and currency that you have in your pocket? The balances you have in your checking, money market or savings account? How about the value of your stocks and bonds? The government (mainly the Federal Reserve) provides numbers about the money supply -- M1, M2, M3 and M0, which only goes to show that there is no simple definition on which all agree.

A majority of Americans believe in "fate" a new survey finds. Horoscopes? Not so much. (YouGov poll image)

Majority of Americans believe in fate: Poll

- The Washington Times

Horoscopes don't carry as much weight with Americans as the idea of "fate" according to a new survey. A majority, in fact, believe in fate. The world of Leo, Libra, Gemini and the other star signs? Not so much.

Illustration on Oregon and the effects of Liberal statism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Oregon as America's Greece

As most of the world points,laughs and gives the headshake to Greece over its socialist-driven economic meltdown, Americans don't need to look east to see the scourge of liberal policies. Look west to the state of Oregon, and you'll see our very own fascist chaos wrapped in concern-troll self-righteousness that would make every failed leftist politician blush.

Nickname nonsense

A federal judge has canceled the Washington Redskins' trademark registrations ("Judge orders cancellation of Redskins trademark registration," Web, July 8).

Voters inured to Clinton's lying?

Well, there she goes again. In an interview with CNN, presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton denied ever having received a subpoena related to her use of a private email server. It's not true, but there's nothing new there ("Hillary Clinton caught in lie: Benghazi committee contradicts claim of no subpoena," Web, July 8).

Oren right about Obama on Israel

Martin Rubin's review of the latest book by former U.S. Ambassador Michael Oren, in contrast to reviews by sycophants of President Obama, presents an accurate picture of the abandonment of Israel by the current administration ("BOOK REVIEW: 'Ally: My Journey Across the American-Israeli Divide,'" Web, July 7). Certainly the other critics do not consider the gravity of Iran obtaining a nuclear weapon and thus obtaining the means of eliminating Israel from the map. This is a threat continually made by the leadership of that Muslim nation.

President Barack Obama pauses while speaking in the Rose Garden of the White House, Thursday, June 25, 2015. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The watchman on the wall

Barack Obama is an intelligent fellow. Smart, sometimes. But for a smart, intelligent man, clever enough to get himself elected president of the United States not once but twice, he has a fifth-grader's understanding of the evil men out there determined to kill us.

In this Friday, June 26, 2015 photo, different varieties of marijuana flowers are displayed at medical marijuana dispensary Kaya Shack in Portland, Ore. On July 1, recreational marijuana in Oregon is legal, but it's likely customers won't be able to buy the pot at medical dispensaries until October 1. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka)

A bust for medical marijuana

Celebrating the medical benefits, if any, of marijuana has been an effective ruse to win social acceptance for getting high. This was thoroughly predictable, and now it's clear that the organized pot heads have been blowing smoke at us.