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FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2014 file photo, a poster for the movie "The Interview" is carried away by a worker after being pulled from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater in Atlanta. Suspicions that North Korea was behind a destructive hacking attack against Sony pictures and a threat against movie theaters will intensify calls for a tougher US Steps to cuts its access to hard currency and declare it once more as a state sponsor of terrorism.   (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Hollywood cowers at this laff riot

- The Washington Times

Movies may not be better than ever, as a Hollywood marketing slogan in yesteryear boasted they were, but the critics take movies seriously in North Korea. The chief movie critic in Pyongyang can kill a movie with a single review. He might even kill anybody who goes to see it.

Illustration on steps needed to protect U.S. intellectual property by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lessons from the Sony hack attack

The hacking attack of Sony Corp. and the compromising of its intellectual property should send a wake-up call to American business. If Sony can be hacked, so too can our companies that make defense technologies. This attack reveals that the very innovations that give us our competitive edge in the world, both commercially and strategically, are gravely at risk.

Illustration on continued access to Juvenile criminal records by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Allowing access to juveniles’ records hurts their chances of going straight

By incapacitating violent and dangerous offenders, incarceration can promote public safety. But a point of diminishing returns is reached as prisons sweep in more and more nonviolent, low-risk offenders. These circumstances are even more alarming when you look at the juvenile justice system and consider that 95 percent of youths in this system have committed nonviolent offenses, including some that weren’t even a crime when many of us were kids.

Illustration on Obama's normalization policy towards Cuba by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama adds Cuba to his list of sellouts

President Obama continues to embrace low-tier, go-it-alone executive actions to pad the last two years of his mistake-filled, empty-agenda presidency in a hopeless hunt for a legacy. His arrogant decision this week to re-establish diplomatic relations with communist Cuba is the latest example of a president desperately searching for something do without having to deal with Congress.

A Rolling Stone article alleged a gang rape occurred at the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia. The magazine has since issued an apology for the article, saying the reporter's trust in her source was misplaced. (Associated Press)

Bogus stories abound in our pathetic press

Will Rogers, the late American humorist and cornpone philosopher, once said, “All I know is what I read in the papers.” That statement earned him a place in “Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations.” Were he alive today, it would most likely be inviting widespread derision. Today’s newspapers abound with bogus stories.

Illustration on Congress' continuing resolution provisions eroding Constitutional liberties by Alexandr Hunter/The Washington Times

President and Congress are heedless to the limits of their power

When the government is waving at us with its right hand, so to speak, it is the government’s left hand that we should be watching. Just as a magician draws your attention to what he wants you to see so you will not observe how his trick is performed, last week presented a textbook example of public disputes masking hidden deceptions. Here is what happened.

Illustration on the need to identify Islamic terrorism for what it is by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Suicide by political correctness

- The Washington Times

During its coverage of this week’s Islamic terrorist attack in Sydney, Australia, CNN ran a telling banner: “Motivation of suspect unknown.” Motivation unknown? Really?

The Ghost of Flight 93 Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thwarting U.S. defenses will lead only to more American victims

The attack on a cafe in Sydney, Australia, by a self-described Islamic cleric with a long police record, left two hostages dead, along with the cleric. That incident, which was televised worldwide, was quickly eclipsed by the massacre of 145 people at an army-run school in Peshawar, Pakistan. How is the West responding to these and other atrocities? More important, how is the Muslim world responding?

This is a copy of the cover of the CIA torture report released by Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein D-Calif., Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014. U.S. Senate investigators delivered a damning indictment of CIA interrogations Tuesday, accusing the spy agency of inflicting suffering on prisoners beyond its legal limits and peddling unsubstantiated stories that the harsh questioning saved American lives.  (AP Photo)

The truth about the CIA, torture, and congressional ingratitude

The truth – that enhanced interrogations saved lives, frightened other terrorists to not act, uncovered plots, and showed any al Qaeda wannabees that joining in would have serious personal consequences – is completely missing from the Senate Democrats’ report.

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BOOK REVIEW: 'The Great Abraham Lincoln Pocket Watch Conspiracy'

if you share my addiction for forbidden chocolates of the soul, get a copy of "The Great Abraham Lincoln Pocket Watch Conspiracy," settle in by the fire and prepare for a laugh-out-loud return to those thrilling days of yesteryear.

Illustration on Obama's political setback in the 2014 mid-term elections by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An amnesty plan fit for an emperor, not America

President Obama’s executive order on amnesty is long and complex. Take a speed reading course and here’s what you can find out: nobody goes home unless the president decides you are unworthy of his beneficence.

Refugees on the transport Gen. W.C. Langfitt are seen as it docked in New York, July 12, 1955. (AP Photo/Anthony Camerano)

A nation of immigrants built on common sense

"The immigrants watched helplessly as the angry crowd spit out epithets at them, little children clinging to their mothers' skirts for safety. It had been a long, arduous journey, and at the other end, they met nothing but rejection and hatred."

A young boy tosses a football as people walk past a business boarded up to protect against looting in Ferguson, Mo. The unmistakable signs of healing are beginning to dot Ferguson, even the small area of town that has been the center of the world's attention. But those in the community know they've got a long way to go. (Associated Press)

How amnesty, Ferguson are connected

Ferguson has inadvertently drawn the national media spotlight as an epitome of communities across America that are besieged by the effects of constantly loose labor markets where there are far more workers than jobs.

Protecting American workers during the immigration debate

For the past decade, perhaps the one issue that has crossed partisan lines yet created a national divide is our nation's immigration policy. And now that President Obama has issued an executive order granting amnesty to millions of Americans, we have to discuss how this impacts American workers.

Illustration on Democrats' difficulties with Obama by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Democrats to Obama: The party’s over

It turns out there is more infighting among Democrats and the White House over a host of issues than there is in the Republican ranks. Sen. Charles E. Schumer lifted the lid on the behind-the-scenes, postelection bickering and discord that now divides his party.

Protesters hold up their hands while chanting "hands up don't shoot" outside Ebenezer Baptist Church, the church where The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. preached, as U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder speaks inside to members of the community during an interfaith service, Monday, Dec. 1, 2014, in Atlanta. Holder traveled to Atlanta to meet with law enforcement and community leaders for the first in a series of regional meetings around the country. The president asked Holder to set up the meetings in the wake of clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Missouri. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

'Hands up, don't shoot' named the most cited phrase in the world by language researchers

- The Washington Times

With the media's help, "Hands Up, Don't Shoot" has become the most cited phrase in the world according to the Global Language Monitor, a Texas-based research group that bases its judgment strictly on public usage, relying on specialized computer software to gauge how frequently the phrase appeared in 275,000 electronic and print news sources, plus social media worldwide.

Iranian Aggression in Mideast Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Delaying a nuclear deal advances Iran’s goal of hegemony with a Shiite crescent

Nov. 24 loomed as a strategic date in the history of the globe. Since the P5 plus 1 nations decided a deal with Iran could not be reached, though, history has been delayed seven months. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, among others, has said "no deal is better than a bad deal," but it appears as if the Obama administration and the P5 plus 1 group are seeking any deal rather than no deal.

Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ferguson destroyed itself at the urging of cruel-hearted outsiders

What is difficult to understand is the benefit that the Ferguson, Missouri, community derives from burning and looting business establishments in their own neighborhoods, especially when unemployment is already a problem. In the meantime, the outside agitators in many cases are sitting in their hotel rooms sipping wine and watching the carnage on television.

Scott Panetti Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the death penalty is immoral

When Scott Panetti stood in court to defend himself against charges of killing his in-laws, he cut quite a figure. Wearing a purple cowboy costume and bandanna, he showed bizarre behavior in the courtroom. He picked one juror with the flip of a coin. He attempted to subpoena more than 200 witnesses, including John F. Kennedy, the pope and Jesus Christ. He slept through some of the testimony.

Businesses were left in piles of rubble in the aftermath of violence and looting in Ferguson, Missouri, on the night of Nov. 24.    Associated Press photo

Paying a price for their Ferguson mayhem

No matter whose side you are on in the upheaval following the killing of Michael Brown by Police Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri, everyone should agree on the profound sadness of it all: sadness that an 18-year-old boy-man walked a path that led to his destruction; sadness that a police officer felt the need to defend himself by shooting another human being; sadness over the rioting and looting that followed a grand jury's decision not to indict Officer Wilson; and, for some, sadness that Officer Wilson was not indicted.