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Bankruptcy is the only way Greece can fashion a new beginning

Almost every option facing debt-drenched Greece is bad, but there is only one that will end this Greek tragedy for good. Let Greece go bankrupt. Then let this once-rich nation, hit the restart button to rebuild its economy.

U.S. President Ronald Reagan gestures as Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev looks on after their third session of talks at the Hofdi in Reykjavik, Oct. 12, 1986. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)

Obama’s Reykjavik moment

The choice for the president on the Iran nuclear talks is clear: walk away with dignity or appease and submit in disgrace.

Obama’s Clean Power Plan could push millions of minority Americans into poverty

This summer the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will finalize its carbon-dioxide emission regulations under President Obama’s Clean Power Plan. The EPA’s own data projects the regulations will reduce global carbon by less than 1 percent and sea level rise by one one-hundredth of an inch. The price Americans will pay for these “benefits” is layoffs and increased energy rates. Yet for the nation’s most vulnerable, the impacts will be far worse, pushing millions into poverty.

‘Death with dignity’ is often coerced by those with financial interests

Earlier this year, legislation was introduced to the D.C. Council that would legalize physician-assisted suicide in our nation’s capital for an adult patient diagnosed with a terminal condition and less than six months to live. Although this initiative has been introduced in 24 states this year (not passing in any so far), its passage in the District of Columbia this year risks setting a dangerous precedent for the rest of the nation.

(Photo courtesy of The White House)

The surging truth-tellers of the GOP

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is surging in New Hampshire, and Chris Christie’s back on the hunt, sounding like a born-again contender. They’re both long shots — the Donald is off the board — but they’re making the kind of noise the wiseheads say they can’t make.

Members of left wing parties hold placards reading in Greek ''NO'' next to a Presidential Guard, Evzonas, during a protest outside the Greek Parliament in Athens, Sunday, June 28, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras says the Bank of Greece has recommended that banks remain closed and restrictions be imposed on transactions, after the European Central Bank didn't increase the amount of emergency liquidity the lenders can access from the central bank. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

The Greeks should vote “no!”

Voting “no” offers Greeks some prospects for better solutions, whereas voting “yes” guarantees penury.

Illustration on the uncontrolled growth of Federal banking regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The squeeze of regulatory kudzu

It is called the vine that ate the South. Kudzu was first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia as an ornamental plant for home gardens. It pretty much stayed that way for half a century, until the federal government got involved. The Roosevelt administration decided that kudzu would be helpful against soil erosion and made it a mission of the Soil Erosion Service to plant kudzu all across the South. Now kudzu covers 12,000 square miles. Kudzu is estimated to smother another 150,000 acres each year.

Energy Independence Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A declaration of energy independence

The United States is closer than ever before to fulfilling the vision of our Founding Fathers. By achieving energy independence, we can achieve freedom from foreign influence.

Fireworks Warning Label Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The sticky legalisms of wacky warning labels

Not too long ago, common sense ruled the day, so called because it was shared by nearly everybody. Common values, commonly understood sense of right and wrong, just and unjust, all expressed in a common language of fairness.

Illustration on raising the minimum wage in light of its effect on Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Puerto Rico’s minimum-wage object lesson

A report released by the Puerto Rican government this week fingers the territory’s minimum wage as a prime factor in its emerging debt crisis. Though its economy is significantly less developed than even the poorest American states, it is still subject to the federal $7.25 minimum wage, 77 percent of its median wage. This high wage floor acts as a significant employment barrier, contributing to the island’s pathetic 43 percent labor force participation rate and its economic stagnation in general.

Illustration on lower-cost tailored television choices by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

TV with a choice

Question: What do rabid football fans, working moms and Clifford the Big Red Dog viewers have in common?

Related Articles

A German writer evokes Hitler's final days

This is the 10th and final volume of "Echalot" -- a German word for sonar, also rendered as echo soundings -- a monumental collection of firsthand accounts of World War II published in the course of two decades by the distinguished postwar German novelist Walter Kempowski -- the first to appear in English.

Sen. Lindsey Graham has released his autobiography as a free download.

'Everyone has a story' -- Lindsey Graham writes autobiography, gives it away as free download

- The Washington Times

Available for free: "My Story" by Sen. Lindsey Graham, a 126-page autobiography released online by his presidential campaign. The e-book reveals that the GOP hopeful had a challenging, modest childhood, served his country, flew a C-130, won his public offices. "Everyone has a story. Not everyone has to tell it, of course, and most people have the good sense not to," he writes.

Abortion in the balance

Abortion is the unresolved issue in American politics. The U.S. Supreme Court thought it settled the issue with its Roe v. Wade decision in 1972, but lawsuits questioning the specifics of how a woman can terminate a pregnancy continue to flood the dockets of lower courts across the nation. Occasionally a case still winds up before the high court as well. Lives, black and white, matter, and issues of life and death carry profound moral significance that continue to challenge judges. Conscience is innate, not a creation of the state.

More turbine hot air

Yesterday, June 15, wind-energy rent-takers marked "Global Wind Day." This is just another orchestrated media event designed to distract taxpayers, electricity consumers and wind-turbine victims from the follies of wind energy.

Religious leaders not infallible

Pope Francis is infallible, or so his flock believes, in matters of Catholic religious doctrine. His clerical robes and position as leader of Roman Catholicism, however, grant him no special expertise when it comes to other subjects fraught with dispute. He brings nothing new to the table with respect to the vicissitudes of climate, the vexing Palestinian problem, changing hemlines in women's fashion or any other of the problems that beset us.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush waves to the crowd as he formally joins the race for president with a speech at Miami Dade College, Monday, June 15, 2015, in Miami. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

A new Jeb Bush

The "official" entry of Jeb Bush into the Republican presidential race leaves an important unanswered question hanging over the race. The former governor of Florida had announced earlier, with the usual drumroll, that if he became a candidate he would mount a different kind of campaign. He would be the happy warrior. He had never liked the grit and grime of take-no-prisoners campaigning or the gotcha! politics characteristic of recent Republican contests. He just wouldn't be a part of a campaign like that.

President Barack Obama waves after speaking at a White House mentorship and leadership graduation ceremony , Monday, June 15, 2015, in the Blue Room of the White House in Washington (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The end of a grand deception

For at least 30 years, honest observers have been pointing out the failure of liberal policies in the inner-city neighborhoods of America. The ugly truth is that these policies have not merely failed. They have been toxic.

GOP's Healthcare Plan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A GOP plan for life after Obamacare

The U.S. Supreme Court will soon decide King v. Burwell, a case that will determine the future of the Affordable Care Act.

Illustration on Obama's fantasist thinking on a nuclear Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The road to historic chaos

Lt. Gen. Michael T. Flynn served 33 years in the U.S. Army. Being named President Obama's director of the Defense Intelligence Agency in 2012 was the culmination of his career. He thought his job was to relate facts, not fables. It soon became clear that his superiors didn't agree.

Illustration on Hillary's apparently socialist positioning in her campaign by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Stumping on platitudes

Struggling to come up with a strategy to put her in the Oval Office, Hillary Clinton has declared war on billionaires, big business, hedge-fund managers, Wall Street and anyone else who has become successful in the American economy.

Illustration on threats to Hillary's nomination hopes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary's race warms up

What did I tell you a couple of weeks ago? In fact, what have I been suggesting for months? Hillary is going to have a very tough time winning her party's nomination.

Voter Fraud Technique Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Counting on vote fraud

When two of the nation's most prominent liberals claim that a political phenomenon does not exist, you know you've hit a sore spot.

Singer Pat Boone, a longtime supporter of traditional American values, will address the Heritage Foundation on Wednesday. (PAT BOONE)

Pat Boone -- conservative stalwart, cultural icon -- to have his say at the Heritage Foundation

- The Washington Times

Among the hundreds of policy events in the nation's capital on Wednesday, one in particular stands out. Authentic cultural icon, family man, ace performer, man of faith and conservative stalwart Pat Boone is in town to have his say about the state of the nation, and his own 60-year career in entertainment. He'll appear at high noon at the Heritage Foundation, just a few blocks from the U.S. Capitol.

Illustration on the push for transparency concerning IRS spending by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Show me the money

One of the challenges the seemingly never-ending list of Republican presidential candidates must face in what is sure to be an all-out political brawl in 2016 is finding a unique way to explain that America does not have a tax revenue problem; it has a massive spending addiction.