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Stanton Evans Portrait Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A tribute to Stan Evans

At last year’s CPAC Reagan banquet, Stan Evans regaled attendees with tales of the early days of the American Conservative Union. His remarks — oh so accurate, oh so funny, and preserved for posterity on YouTube — conveyed important history lessons.

Freedom yes, redefining marriage no

By an almost 2-1 margin, Americans in a recent poll declared they agree that “States and citizens should remain free to uphold marriage as the union of a man and a woman and the Supreme Court shouldn’t force all 50 states to redefine marriage.”

Muzzling the Government Watchdog Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Losing both bark and bite over Hillary’s emails

Outrage over the revelation of Hillary Clinton’s exclusive use of her personal email during her time at the State Department has brought broad-based criticism from the entire political spectrum. (In fact, it was the lefty New York Times that broke the story.)

President Barack Obama introduces first lady Michelle Obama in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015, as they announce their ‘Let Girls Learn’ initiative. The Obama administration is expanding efforts and directing a variety of federal agencies to work with other countries to help young girls worldwide attend and stay in school. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A crippled presidency

If someone were writing a book about America at this point in time, it should be titled “The Decline and Fall of Barack Obama’s Presidency.”

Soldiers listen to U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter at Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan, Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015. Carter is making his first trip to visit troops and commanders in Afghanistan since his swearing-in this week. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)

Vanquishing the enemy

As the Islamic State and other militant Islamist groups are attracting young men and women into its ranks, will we honor the primary duty of the federal government?

In this March 3, 2015, photo, President Barack Obama speaks about Iran and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to Congress during a meeting with Defense Secretary Ashton Carter in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The audacity of weakness

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu spoke to Congress on Tuesday to warn Americans of the anti-Western threats from theocratic — and likely to soon be nuclear — Iran.

The Court and the Burwell Obamacare Case Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A prescription for health care after Burwell

On Wednesday, the nine justices of the United States Supreme Court will consider the case of King v. Burwell, concerning the constitutionality of Obamacare, determining the limits of President Obama’s executive power and the ability of the president to rewrite laws on his own while ignoring the constitutional duties of the legislative branch of government.

A Nuclear-Armed Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dubious deal of the century

Remember when President Obama said that to prevent the Islamic Republic of Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapons capability, he would keep all options “on the table”? How long has it been since anyone took that warning seriously?

The Tarheels Step on Themselves Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cleaning up the campus boondoggles

Readers of this column are familiar with my argument that a conservative tide is sweeping the country, contrary to the mainstream media. In the off-year elections of 2010 and 2014, the gains made by conservatives have been substantial in governors’ mansions and in state legislatures. To be sure, they have been substantial in Washington, too, at the House and Senate level, but I would argue that they have been more consequential at the state level. There, old conventions that have been in place since the left-wing 1960s are being heaved out and a clamor of protest is being heard from the evicted. It can only get worse.

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Farmworkers pick paper trays of dried raisins off the ground and heap them onto a trailer in the final step of raisin harvest.  (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka, File)

Raisins get their day in court

The humble raisin — a grape left too long in the sun — is about to get its day in court. The U.S. Supreme Court has taken a case fraught with questions about economic freedom, the guarantee of private property and the rights set out in the Fifth Amendment, and at bottom it's about a few raisins and the farmers who harvested them.

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2014 file photo, then-acting Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. US officials say President Barack Obama has picked  Clancy as agency's director.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Obama guarantees Secret Service failings

With the selection of Acting Secret Service Director Joseph P. Clancy as the director, President Obama has guaranteed that the agency will continue to lurch from one shocking security failure to another.

Roots of Terrorism Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The futility of appeasing terror

Terrorism was born and has been abroad in the Middle East for decades, only now it is under an Islamic umbrella. Before there was Islamist terrorism, there was Palestinian terrorism. Of course, extremist Islam is a dimension of today's turmoil that cries out for reform.

A new Dr. Seuss book is due in July - based on long lost manuscript and artwork. (Random House)

Green eggs and what? New Dr. Seuss book to be published from long lost manuscript and artwork

- The Washington Times

It's been a quarter century since the last Dr. Seuss book was published. But his widow and a former secretary revealed Wednesday that they made a startling discovery: The pair found a box filled with an original manuscript plus artwork by the beloved children's author in the old office space of his California home. And voila. A new book titled "What Pet Should I Get?" will be published by Random House Children's Books, to be released July 28.

Jon Stewart Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Jon Stewart, exit stage left

The irrepressible New York Times is at it again. First it destroys the credibility of the most trusted newsreader in America, Brian Williams, and leaves him in a heap, exposed as a flagrant liar. Now it is destroying the credibility of the most trusted comic in America, Jon Stewart, and intent on leaving him, too, in a heap, exposed also as a flagrant liar. The New York Times used all of its investigative skills to expose Mr. Williams, and it is using them again to expose the wretched Mr. Stewart.

President Obama. (Associated Press)

Obama's amnesty express

The temporary injunction issued Monday in Texas, barring the Obama administration from proceeding with the president's amnesty for millions of illegal aliens, halted the amnesty express. But the order is only an obstacle, and the crucial word here is "temporary." U.S. Judge Andrew S. Hanen's order has been appealed by the U.S. Justice Department, and the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans might very well alter it, tweak it or suspend it. Judge Hanen did not rule on the merits of the lawsuit brought by Texas and supported by 25 other states.

Shameful talking heads

Mohammed Saeed al-Sahhaf, AKA "Baghdad Bob," was a former Iraqi diplomat. He came under worldwide ridicule while acting as the spokesperson for the Saddam Hussein regime during the 2003 Gulf War.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has a small lead in early polls in New Hampshire. (Associated Press)

Jockeying for poll position

The grueling political marathon for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination has begun, with three contenders out in front and everyone else far behind.

Infrastructure in Need of Repair Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rebuilding the American powerhouse

Our infrastructure is collapsing, and Americans know it. They see it every day in the potholes they drive over, the bridges in their communities that have been shut down and the water pipes that burst.

Victory at all Costs Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The face of evil

The graphic pictures of a Jordanian pilot being burned alive by militants from the Islamic State, or ISIS, were chilling and raised doubts about the humanity of the Islamic terrorists capable of such barbarism. This coupled with beheadings and crucifixions gives us a better understanding of the evil we, along with the rest of the world, are facing.

Evolution's lingering questions

Several years ago in an Internet commentary many people were complaining about God being mentioned as our Creator in a Texas textbook. Based on their belief that we all evolved, I wrote and asked which evolved first — male or female? I was called a Neanderthal and a member of the flat earth society who didn't believe planes could fly and other names.

Corruption of Green Energy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Peeking behind the ‘green’ curtain

This week Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber, a Democrat, leaves office, having resigned under the cloud of a cronyism and corruption scandal. A U.S. attorney has subpoenaed "records that are a catalog of Kitzhaber's climate and economy-related initiatives," centering on money given to Mr. Kitzhaber's fiancee Cylvia Hayes. Ms. Hayes served a curious triple role of "first lady," adviser to the governor on energy policy and well-compensated consultant for the "clean energy" industry.

How the Spanish Civil War shaped history

Richard Rhodes has a way of taking on big topics and famous incidents and locales from Hiroshima to Hollywood and writing about them in prose that is both accessible and memorable.