Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

FILE - In this March 22, 2014, file photo, former President Bill Clinton, left, listens as former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a student conference for the Clinton Global Initiative University at Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz. Clinton had long ago moved on from her bruising defeat in her 2008 presidential run. Clinton questioned whether the country was willing to give her family the White House for the third time. A less talked about concern was health, both hers and her husbands. The former president had undergone quadruple bypass surgery and had to make drastic lifestyle changes. Hillary Clinton would be 69 years old on Election Day, tying Ronald Reagan as the oldest American to be elected president if she won. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)

The Clinton money-market account

- The Washington Times

If we can believe Hillary Clinton (and there’s no reason why anyone should), she and Bubba have gone from “dead broke” when they left the White House to accumulating riches that beggar Croesus, the ancient king of Lydia, and Midas, who was rich even before he started selling mufflers for Pontiacs and Chevys. Nevertheless, Hillary and Bubba are lining up now for seconds.

This image released by Vani Hari shows the food blogger among boxes of cereal in Charlotte, N.C. The former management consultant turned healthy-living activist has a best-selling book and an army of supporters. She deploys them regularly to move giants in the food industry via online petitions that, among other things, helped get Kraft Foods to give up artificial dyes in its macaroni and cheese. (Courtesy Vani Hari via AP)

The crusade of food bimbos

This week, Kraft Foods announced that it was changing the formulation of its famous macaroni and cheese. The company will remove food coloring after being the latest target of an online peasants-with-pitchforks campaign run by a blogger calling herself “The Food Babe.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, and Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., right,  head into the Senate Chamber on Cap[itol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 23, 2015, for the confirmation vote on the nomination of Loretta Lynch for Attorney General. Lynch won confirmation to serve as attorney general Thursday from a Senate that forced her to wait more than five months for the title and remained divided to the end.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Getting back to business

Anyone looking for signs that Barack Obama’s presidency is running out of gas got a glimmer of hope this week from his daily schedule.

Illustration on Holder's contempt for justice while attorney general by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A calculated corruptor of justice

The first attorney general to be held in contempt of Congress has demonstrated shocking contempt for the law, and the ability to abuse and corrupt it for the political and social agenda of this president.

Eric Holder’s legacy

As Attorney General Eric Holder finally departs, he leaves behind a demoralized Justice Department that has been politicized to an unprecedented degree.

Illustration on Eric Holder's history of pardoning and releasing terrorists by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In agreement with America’s enemies

Only days before President Obama’s inauguration in Jan., 2009, I was invited to testify at Eric Holder’s confirmation hearing regarding his engineering, as deputy attorney general, the infamous 1999 Clinton clemency grants to 16 unrepentant members of the Puerto Rican terror group, Armed Forces of National Liberation (FALN).

Justice driven by race illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Eric Holder’s legacy

Alas, the Eric Holder era is over. But critics who think his departure means normalcy will return haven’t been paying attention. Mr. Holder was President Obama’s point man for fundamentally transforming the country, and he did his job well.

Illustration on the adverse impact of five years of Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shreds of doubt about Obamacare

Last week’s tax-filing deadline was a little bit more complicated than in the past, thanks to Obamacare.

Illustration on Hillary and money questions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary’s hurdles

Nearly four months into the two-year presidential election cycle, Hillary Clinton is running into deep trouble on several major political fronts.

Wind mills work atop the mesa near Sterling City, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

Financing Climate Crisis, Inc.

The Obama administration is using climate change to “fundamentally transform” America. It plans to make the climate crisis industry so enormous that no one will be able to dismantle it, even as computer models and disaster claims totally lose credibility — and even if Republicans control Congress and the White House after 2016.

Related Articles

Illustration on North Korea's example of nuclear non-compliance as prologue for Iran's likely behavior by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A lesson about Iran from North Korea

In 2014, the U.S. State Department Arms Control Compliance Report stated: "Iran currently is in violation of obligations under [the Nuclear non-Proliferation Treaty], its [United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency] Safeguards Agreement, and relevant U.N. Security Council resolutions ." Question: Why are we negotiating for a new agreement, when existing Iranian Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) violations persist unresolved, suggesting that Iran is busily producing nuclear weapons and is unlikely to comply with any new agreement? Historically, such negotiation is unprecedented.

Protestors filled the Capitol rotunda in Helena, Mont., during a February rally to show support in an attempt to change the Montana Constitution to define life as beginning at conception. The so-called personhood initiative is intended to prompt a legal challenge to Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that established a legal right to abortion. (AP Photo)

Personhood? Two thirds of Americans say 'fetuses in the womb are people': Poll

- The Washington Times

Two thirds of Americans believe that "fetuses in the womb are people" - that includes 80 percent of Republicans and 56 percent of Democrats. The source is a YouGov poll conducted in the wake of a shocking attack on a pregnant woman in Colorado that left her injured, and resulted in the loss of her unborn child. The pollster addressed that issue too, revealing that 76 percent of Americans overall agree that if an attack on a pregnant woman leads to the death of her unborn child, a murder charge is appropriate.

Palestinian residents of the besieged refugee camp of Yarmouk wait at the gate of the camp to receive aid supplies from the United Nations on the southern edge of the Syrian capital, Damascus. The deteriorating situation brought on by Syria's civil war prompted the U.N. Security Council to call an emergency meeting Monday, April 6, 2015, to discuss Yarmouk, calling for safe evacuation for the Palestinians, protection for the refugees, and humanitarian access to the camp. (AP Photo/SANA, File)

Muslims killing Muslims

The barbarians of ISIS no longer have the ability to surprise anyone. They have beheaded innocents, set a captive afire in a cage, taught children how to shoot to kill at point-blank range, and murdered Christians only because they worship the Christ. The West is outraged, both for the brutality and by its frustration for not doing much about it.

Republican Presidential candidate, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks, Wednesday, April 8, 2015, in Milford, N.H. Paul, a newly declared Republican presidential candidate, is dodging a central question about abortion: What exceptions, if any, should be made if the procedure were to be banned? In an interview with The Associated Press on Wednesday, Paul would not say where, in his view, a pregnant woman’s rights begin and those of the fetus end.(AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Rand Paul to the starting line

If diversity is the secret of winning politics, the Republicans are running the most ambitious cafeteria in town, featuring the favorite dishes of several freshman senators fired by both conviction and ambition. If a hungry customer doesn't see what he wants, there's probably something else coming from the kitchen.

Illustration on how past masculine behavior has backfired on men in today's culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When women are as mad as the men

Sometimes a rolling stone that gathers no moss picks up a lot of dirt, sticks and debris. That happened when one particular Rolling Stone published a slanderous and sloppy attempt to tell a story about a fictitious gang rape at the University of Virginia. The magazine "officially" retracted the story only after the Columbia Journalism Review demonstrated how it failed at every level of responsible reporting and editing.

Illustration on media complicity in Obama's political deceit by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The dirty little (open) secret about the press

Rolling Stone finally admitted that its recent story about a vicious rape on the University of Virginia campus was a lie. Adding journalistic insult to injury, the magazine announced that the "reporter" who made it up will face no disciplinary action. In fact, she gets to keep her job at the magazine.

On Iran, no one to trust

President Obama appears to be on the road again, electronically speaking, hyping the yet-to-be-agreed-upon nuclear deal with Iran. He is pitching a scenario that is totally opposite from the one Iran is relating. Both cannot be right.

Illustration on the redundancy of the Indiana RFRA law by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shooting themselves in the feet

The turmoil over the efforts by the state of Indiana to make lawful the decisions by operators of public accommodations to decline their services based on their stated religious views has died down. The legislature amended the offending parts of its legislation so that the new law prohibits denying services based on sexual orientation, yet its affirmations of religious liberty are meaningless.

Responding to the attack on Pearl Harbor

Unless you are now 80 or more years old, you could hardly be expected to have memories of those dark days after the attacks by Japanese forces on Pearl Harbor, the Philippines and the British, French and Dutch colonies in the Western Pacific.

Republicans and Democrats join to fight public sector unions illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Finding common cause in fighting public sector unions

"If we don't win this fight, there's no other fight left." That's what New Jersey's Republican Gov. Chris Christie said soon after taking office in 2010, when he faced off with the unions representing some 400,000 state employees. Mr. Christie knew what was at stake when he pushed through reforms that included changes in future pensions and greater employee contributions for health care.

FILE - In this May 24, 2011 file photo, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu walks with House Speaker  John Boehner of Ohio, to make a statement on Capitol Hill in Washington.  American politicians like to pick and choose when they’ll abide by the storied notion that politics should stop at the water's edge, and when to give that idea a kick in the pants.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

When the thrill of a romance is gone

That pop and crackle in the air is the sound of strains on a romance, like the noise of a cooling wood stove. The Jewish love affair with the Democratic Party has not gone bust by any means but it's beginning to frazzle at the edges, as unrequited love inevitably does. The Democratic left, which now dominates the party, does not like Israel very much.

In this Aug. 17, 2010 file photo, U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald talks to reporters after a jury found former Gov. Rod Blagojevich guilty on one count of the 24 counts against him in his federal corruption trial. in Chicago. Robert Blagojevich the brother of imprisoned former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich offers fresh details in a new book to back his contention prosecutors used him as a pawn to get his younger sibling on charges he sought to hock President Barack Obama's old U.S. Senate seat. While charges were eventually dropped against him, the Tennessee businessman, says his refusal to turn on his brother made him "collateral damage" of an overzealous prosecution that cost his reputation, $1 million in legal bills and a still-unrepaired family split. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

The crimes of the prosecutors

Prosecutors, like cops, usually deal with people who aren't very nice. Prosecutors at every level rarely see the occasional bursts of human kindness that lead the rest of us to see the good among the bad. Unfortunately, some prosecutors, blind to the good among the bad, conclude that evildoers don't deserve a break, that the important thing is to get evildoers behind bars, so anything goes. If no actual evildoers are available, make one up.

No water, no oil illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The browning of California’s green movement

Two big stories in recent days are President Obama's veto of the Keystone XL pipeline project, no matter the State Department's study that concludes that the effort would have little effect on climate change, and California's decision, as a result of severe drought, to impose mandatory water restrictions. But Gov. Jerry Brown's executive order to cut water use by 25 percent reflects the slow pace of California dreaming, with regulations probably not implemented for another 45 days or so.

Illustration on the untrustworthy Iranian leadership by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The win-win delusion

"The West Capitulates." That was the headline on an article by Ibrahim al-Amin, editor of the Lebanese daily al-Akbar. He elaborated: "Victors and vanquished. This is the truth of conflicts in the world since ancient times. Only those who live with their eyes closed believe conflicts end with compromises."