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NARAL Fetus Scale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Skewing data to uphold abortion

In a recent article, NARAL Pro-Choice America released a poll making the startling claim that nearly 70 percent of registered voters say the government should not restrict access to abortion.

ADVANCE FOR SATURDAY, AUG. 30, AND THEREAFTER - FILE - This Aug. 14, 2014, file photo shows New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie as he speaks during a town hall meeting in Ocean City, N.J.  One set of elections ends in early November as another begins when presidential hopefuls cross the unofficial starting line in the 2016 race for the White House. With control of the Senate at stake, the months leading up to the mid-term elections offer a clearer window on a crowd of potential presidential candidates already jockeying for position from Nevada to New Hampshire. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

Killing the death tax

The estate tax, or “death tax,” has been a historical grievance for many American families. Its roots go back to the short-lived stamp tax (1797-1802), and includes the 1862 Revenue Act and 1898 War Revenues Act.

Illustration by Schrank, Handelszeitung, Zurich, Switzerland

Obama’s wobbly foreign policy

One of the critical rules of warfare is to never let the enemy know your plans of how, when and where you will respond.

Illustration on selling Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sell Fannie and Freddie, don’t kill them

It’s time for the U.S. government to sell its ownership stake in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two giant mortgage funders, and let them sink or swim by themselves.

Winston Churchill, leader of the opposition in the present Parliament, shown on grounds of Chartwell, his Westerham, Kent, home on Sept. 20, 1951. (AP Photo)

Behind the sinking of the Lusitania

About how America became involved in certain wars, many conspiracy theories have been advanced — and some have been proved correct.

Julaine Appling, president of Wisconsin Family Action, right, and her organization's attorney Mike Dean, defenders of Wisconsin's state ban on gay marriage, talk to reporters after attending a hearing before the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on the challenges to Indiana and Wisconsin's gay marriage ban Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Europe stands strong for traditional definition of marriage

A court decision issued last month about same-sex marriage received almost no news coverage in the United States, yet the decision could have significant implications when the U.S. Supreme Court decides whether the Constitution requires it.

Government Control of Broadband Services Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Government broadband signals heavier public debt

The rosy picture painted by proponents of government-owned broadband, like President Obama’s Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler, couldn’t be more misleading.

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BOOK REVIEW: 'Russian Roulette'

In November 1917, soon after his Bolshevik faction seized control of Russia, Lenin called on the "oppressed masses" of Asia to follow Russia's example and throw off colonial rule.

Bogart and Bacall in "To Have and Have Not."

'Death be not proud'

Robin Williams and Lauren Bacall join this year's roster of celebrity deaths. Their names and fame preoccupy us in public mourning, though most of us were no closer to them in life than to a movie or television screen.

CORRECTS DATE - President Barack Obama, right, smiles as he and former NBA basketball player Alonzo Mourning, left, prepare to ride in a golf cart while golfing at Vineyard Golf Club in Edgartown, Mass., on the island of Martha's Vineyard, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014. Obama is taking a two-week summer vacation on the island. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

The Obama tee party

Trouble in the St. Louis suburbs has rescued President Obama's vacation. He can play all 18 holes at the country club now, safe in the knowledge that he's distracting voters from all the scandals, mismanagement and foreign and domestic policies that are the legacy of his administration.

Ted Williams Baseball Card

Random observations for summer 2014

One of the big differences between Democrats and Republicans is that we at least know what the Democrats stand for, whether we agree with it or not. For Republicans, though, we have to guess.

President Barack Obama, left, points to Sen. Chris Dodd, D-Conn., center, and Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., right, after signing the Dodd Frank-Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in a ceremony in the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, Wednesday, July 21, 2010.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

EDITORIAL: Economic strangulation with red tape

President Obama knows nothing about making the economy grow. On his watch, America's gross domestic product has inched forward at an annual average of 1.2 percent, according to World Bank data. We're outclassed not only by Brazil, China and India, but by Mali, Guatemala, Swaziland and Vanuatu.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Wounded Knee 2014?

Now America knows what Sitting Bull felt like in 1876. It is ironic that the descendants of the very foreign invaders who destroyed the great Lakota Nation should now, 138 years later, be overwhelmed by foreign invaders themselves.

Georgia democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter, left, chats with his grandfather former President Jimmy Carter and grandmother  Rosalynn Carter after attending church in Plains, Ga, Sunday, June 8, 2014. The younger Carter is hoping that a large fundraising effort this weekend will help his campaign. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

EDITORIAL: A Carter gay-rights 'secret' in Georgia

Jason Carter wants to follow in his famous grandfather's footsteps. Mr. Carter, a Democrat, is running for governor of Georgia, a position Jimmy Carter held for a term before moving on to the White House. Jason Carter is willing to say pretty much whatever it takes to win.

Gun-grabber Bloomberg's epic fail in Milwaukee

Billionaire Michael R. Bloomberg could learn a thing or two from the biblical story about an Israelite soldier named David, who went up against Goliath, a giant of a man and a powerful foe.

James E. Ferguson, Texas Governor 1915-1917

The other indicted governor of Texas

Whatever the final outcome of the seemingly politically based indictment of Texas Gov. Rick Perry, it should be noted that the media's references to his being the first Texas chief executive to be charged in nearly a century fails to provide the necessary historical background for the comparison.