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Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, head of Austrian People's Party, smiles in Vienna, Austria, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, after the closing of the polling stations for the Austrian national elections. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader) ** FILE **

An Austrian thumb in the eye of the elites

- The Washington Times

The elites everywhere are having a hard time. When the peasants no longer salute, tug a forelock and obey with a whimper, even if with a snarl and a whine, you know you’ve lost your mojo.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Oct. 17, 2017.

Schooling the U.S. on economic freedom

Once again, there is more evidence that economic freedom leads to success. Many of the former communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union have made enormous economic progress from the time they became free almost three decades ago.

Pope Francis acknowledges the applause of the audience after he delivered his speech during the visit to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on the occasion of the World Food Day, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017.(AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Pope Francis, biblically challenged, blames climate change — again

- The Washington Times

Once again, Pope Francis has pressed forward the mantra that much of the world’s problems — hunger, overrun borders — are due to man’s failures to stop wars and address climate change. This is odd, given a more biblical perspective might say, oh let’s see, wars come from evil desires and hunger, in large part, from wars.

Illustration on Richard Nixon's role in the Vietnam War by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A faulty retelling of ‘The Vietnam War’

When Richard Nixon was in the White House, I was in Vietnam and he was my commander in chief. When I was on Ronald Reagan’s National Security Council staff, I had the opportunity to brief former President Nixon on numerous occasions and came to admire his analysis of current events, insights on world affairs and compassion for our troops. His preparation for any meeting or discussion was exhaustive. His thirst for information was unquenchable and his tolerance for fools was nonexistent.

Illustration on China's designs on the electric car market by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The race for electric vehicle dominance

General Motors and Ford are scurrying to realign for what many believe are the next big things — driverless and electric vehicles (EVs) — but don’t look to Detroit, Japan or Germany for the mighty impulse that transforms personal transportation. With the world’s largest car market and savvy government policies, the advantage goes to China.

Illustration on NATO' difficult situation with member nation Turkey by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving NATO from Turkey

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, known as NATO, faces an existential problem.

Vice President Mike Pence speaks on behalf of Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie during a campaign rally at the Washington County Fairgrounds Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017, in Abingdon, Va. Establishment figure Gillespie is in a neck-and-neck race against Democratic Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam. (Andre Teague/The Bristol Herald-Courier via AP)

Trump heads, Pence tails

If a metaphor could be used for this White House, it might be a two-sided coin with President Trump as heads and Vice President Mike Pence as tails.

A Game of Political Football Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Republican team with no offense

Is the Republican Party in trouble? The primary fight defeat in Alabama and the quick retirement signal by Sen. Bob Corker are not the only straws in the wind. Current polling shows Republicans trail Democrats by 8 percentage points in a generic 2018 House race.

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route Greenville, S.C., for a fundraiser for South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Toward a better nuclear deal with Iran

To hear President Trump’s political opponents describe it, the decision to decertify the Iran Deal is a major miscalculation — a needlessly provocative action that could even bring all-out war.

While early voting may seem more convenient, it actually decreases turnout. (Associated Press/File)

Early voting disadvantages seem to outweigh benefits

Early voting — opening a limited number of locations where people can cast their ballots prior to Election Day — is a “reform” that states should reconsider. Its disadvantages seem to outweigh its benefits.

Illustration on pro-active measures for protecting American cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s aggressive cyberwar

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s regime has been highly aggressive in pursuing cyberwar and cyberespionage at least since its 2007 attacks on the Estonian government. The fact that it is routinely attacking U.S. defense and intelligence cyber-networks can be no surprise.

Illustration on the history leading up the North Korean nuclear crisis by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How we got to a nuclear North Korea

President Trump and his Cabinet have said repeatedly that the present state of affairs with North Korea represents 25 years of American foreign policy failure going back over at least three presidents — Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Reviewing this disaster, there are at least three major mileposts.

American Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A better deal with NAFTA 2.0

America’s trade negotiators are now in the process of crafting a 2.0 update of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Fortunately, it now appears that Donald Trump’s intention on NAFTA is to mend it, not end it. The trade deal has been a stunning economic success for all three nations: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Freer trade has meant steady increases in the volume of trade, greater competitiveness and lower prices.

Related Articles

Democracy fails in Catalan

As a supporter of democracy and self determination, I was glad that last Sunday the people of the Catalan region of Spain tried to vote for independence. Unfortunately the Spanish police cracked down in a most undemocratic way.

People embrace and bow their heads as nearby church bells ring during a vigil Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, in Orlando, Fla., to show solidarity with the victims of the shooting in Las Vegas.  Authorities said Stephen Craig Paddock broke windows on a Las Vegas casino and began firing with a cache of weapons Sunday, killing dozens and injuring hundreds at a country music festival. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

Why gun control won't end mass murder

As the nation continues to reel from the nation's worst mass shooting in modern history, politicians and other opportunists find the massacre too inviting not to exploit. The knee-jerk cravenness of liberals to scrape up their calls for gun-control while demonizing the National Rifle Association (NRA) immediately sucks all the air out of the room, eliminating any discussion or investigation of other foundational forces driving mass violence.

Newt Gingrich Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Newt Gingrich's assist to conservatism and the GOP

The rise of Newt Gingrich from a lowly Georgia congressman to the pinnacle of power as House speaker earned him the reputation as a brilliant tactical magician with Reaganite convictions. Climbing the political heights would turn out to be an arduous task, but he had both the gray matter and the moxie to achieve his lofty ambitions.

Giving an extended break to humanities departments

These words -- etched into the campus gate at my undergraduate alma mater, Ohio University -- provided the model for funding public institutions of higher education from the Appalachian Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. Ohio U., opened in 1804, one year after the Buckeye State entered the Union, would be the first of scores.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks at the Pennsylvania Machine Works, a family-owned pipe-fitting manufacturer, in Aston, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. Ryan pitched Republicans' new tax plan in Congress, telling the workers that lowering corporate taxes in America would make American corporations more competitive and able to ultimately draw more business, hire more people and raise wages. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Should Ryan and McConnell be dumped?

Should House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell be repealed and replaced? The argument for their ouster, repeated ad nauseam, is that Republicans now control both houses of Congress, so how come the leaders won't deliver for their Republican president? But are these attacks reasonable?

Illustration on Joe Biden by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Democratic front-runner for 2020

I have been trying to warn President Trump, but to no avail. I have been trying to caution him about his tweets, but to little effect. Not that they are all that alarming to normal people. Not that they are without their own special charm. In a world filled with Republicans and Independents, most of his tweets would be informative and even amusing. Yet in a world that also includes Democrats, frankly, they are risky. The Democrats have no sense of humor and many are alarmists.

Divided States Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Presidential leadership that unites

President Trump's imbroglios with the NBA and NFL, more than examples of incivility on both sides, illustrate the deep divisions within the nation and why it is so tough for any occupant of the Oval Office to get something done.

New Improved Bitcoin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

AML Bitcoin strides onto the world stage

Bitcoin is a digital currency that exists only online. The value of each bitcoin unit is set by supply and demand in market transactions every day, just like most currencies are today. Since it was launched in 2009, bitcoin has been celebrated, especially by libertarians as a freedom-enhancing innovation potentially freeing people from government control.

Illustration on America's core values and their benefits to the world by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

American values are the antidote for racial hate

More than 35 years ago, I went to Africa for the first time, the junior member of a group of American writers. We were visiting The Gambia and, at a stop in the interior, I purchased a small wooden statue at a roadside kiosk. One of the group asked how much I had paid. I told her and, a bit condescendingly, she suggested that next time I ask for her help because, in this part of the world, one bargains.

How nations define flags, and how flags define them

The most powerful passage in veteran journalist Tim Marshall's breezy if somewhat superficial book on flags comes not from him, but from a man usually associated with universalist nonviolence rather than nationalism.

Beep, beep

Islam, it now turns out, is more flexible than everyone thought it was. King Salman of Saudi Arabia signed a royal decree last week stipulating that allowing women to drive an automobile won't offend Allah, after all. The mutaween, the religious police assigned to promote virtue where they find it and eradicate vice anywhere, will soon inherit an easier work day.

No quick solution to gun violence

For society to manage, however imperfectly, who owns firearms is the Gordian knot no one has figured out how to untie ("President Trump calls Las Vegas mass shooting 'act of pure evil,'" Web, Oct. 2). The lethality of firearms calls for measures to get us from seeming intractability to solution. However, the stark reality is that, with some 300 million firearms (many feeding the underground market) in Americans' hands, it's impossible to unring that bell.

Investigators work at a festival grounds across the street from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, in Las Vegas. Authorities said Stephen Craig Paddock broke windows on the casino and began firing with a cache of weapons, killing dozens and injuring hundreds at the music festival on Sunday. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Exploiting murder at Mandalay Bay

Exploiting a tragedy doesn't take long. It never does. Before the blood was cleaned from the pavement at Mandalay Bay Hotel predictable demands for more gun control lit up the media. Shooters who take the lives of the innocent are clearly deranged, and pols and pundits who immediately seize upon shootings to polish their attacks on the Second Amendment reveal their own cold inclinations. The rest of us are twice victimized.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk with with Puerto Rico's Gov. Ricardo Rossello at the Luis Muniz Air National Guard Base before leaving the island in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. Trump is visiting Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Democrats scramble to paint Puerto Rico as Trump's Katrina

Even before the storm hit the U.S. territory, home to some 3.5 million people, President Trump declared a federal emergency for the island, putting into action a massive rescue-and-relief plan and freeing up millions in aid. The federal government dispatched the military and throngs of first responders to the Caribbean island, along with tons of water and food.

In this Feb. 20, 2011, file photo, the statue of Jesus Christ at Whitefish Mountain Resort overlooks Whitefish Lake and the Flathead Valley in Whitefish, Mont. (Linda Thompson/The Missoulian via AP) ** FILE **

Atheists win right to pray -- really, right to mock

- The Washington Times

The Freedom From Religion Foundation is cheering a recent federal court ruling that allows atheists the right to deliver invocations before local government meetings, same as if they were just another pastor or preacher or priest or true man or woman of God. Of course they're cheering. Atheist rabble-rousers always cheer when they're able to ram their ridiculous suits through court.

Calvin Coolidge

The Coolidge formula

In school, I liked math the least and history the most. Both can be useful in the coming debate over President Trump's proposed tax reforms.