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John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It’s the conceit of every age that it’s uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it’s the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Illustration on the potential political rift presented by the upcoming election by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When an election produces a political realignment

What do the election years 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, 1932 and 1980 have in political common? They are usually described as “critical” or “realigning” elections by historians who argue they produced a significant realignment in our political system.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference held in the Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another useless Iraq surge

Pessimists and cynics are annoying, mostly because events prove them to be right far more often than they are proven wrong. Sometimes pessimism is the necessary result of an examination of history.

Illustration on new moves toward animal liberation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Food for thought about animal liberation

Peter Singer, Princeton professor and author of the book “Animal Liberation,” will be taking his radical views center stage at the upcoming “The Future of Food” event in Washington, D.C. Hosted by the extremist Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the choice of Mr. Singer to keynote the event offers a peek at just how out of touch animal liberation activists are: While Mr. Singer is against eating animals, he’s OK with the idea of having sex with them.

The Second Jacksonian Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When ‘deplorables’ took back their country

The 1829 inauguration of Andrew Jackson ranks as the most raucous in American history. Presidents in those days traditionally held open house for the general public after being sworn in, but no one anticipated that hordes of Jackson’s rough-and-tumble supporters would descend on the nation’s capital for the big day or that they would troupe over to the White House following his inaugural address to shake his hand and guzzle free booze.

Growing the American Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to jump-start the economy

As the presidential debates get underway, we hope that the moderators set personalities aside and spend some quality time asking questions of both candidates about their plans to grow the American economy.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a rally in Roanoke, Va., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Trump faces Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton in the first of three debates Monday.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Terrorism, refugees and Donald Trump

Hilary Clinton’s refugee plan is an open invitation for Radical Islam’s unyielding nature to run roughshod over American culture.

Federal Land Grab Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Grinding westerners under the federal boot

The federal government owns an estimated one-third of all the land in the United States. But this is only a rough estimate, because even the federal government does not actually know how much land it controls.

Illustration on the contrasting media coverage of Hillary and Trump by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The apoplectic liberals

- The Washington Times

Is it journalistic malpractice to quote each side of the argument and leave it to readers to draw their own conclusions?

A study in nuclear contrast

Astudy in contrast: North Korea is killing itself to get an atomic bomb; Kazakhstan is rich because it gave its nukes away.

Charlotte police encountering protesters earlier in the week.           Associated Press photo

A riot that dares not speak its name

- The Washington Times

Charlotte is the conversation we’re getting about race in America, with rioting, death and looting, encouraged by the noise of the mob, the purple rhetoric of certain newspapers, bloody mayhem on the television screen, and encouragement, no doubt unintended, by the president of the United States. It’s a carnival out there, but not much conversation.

Illustration on two possible economic futures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Liars, statistics and politics

This presidential season Americans have been treated to the usual outrageous campaign promises and extraordinary candidate alibis about past transgressions, but those pale in comparison to claims about gains in family incomes served up by the Obama administration last week.

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a rally at Johnson C. Smith University, in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Miserables, deplorables and loose tongues

Hillary Clinton is the pluperfect wonk. She grooves on the trivia of policy and conversations with whoever carries a checkbook. But she doesn't understand campaign politics and has no appreciation of the fine points of the game she insists on trying to play.

Illustration on the prospect of tyranny in America by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why equal justice matters

More than two years ago, several independent researchers, investigative journalists and columnists (including yours truly) began providing evidence and reporting on apparent funds from Russian government-controlled entities funneling into U.S. environmental groups.

Illustration on Hillary's comments on Trump supporters by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The 'Deplorables'

Every now and again secular progressives rip off their mask and tell conservatives what they really think of them.

Union hypocrisy

Last month's first inaugural Fight for $15 convention in Richmond, Va., was overshadowed by the movement's own internal fight. Organizers behind the nationwide campaign demanded a union for themselves and in some cases a $15 minimum wage.

Illustration for Constitution Day by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Our forgotten national birthday

We celebrate every July 4th with fireworks, parades, speeches and other tributes. And rightly so -- our Declaration of Independence heralded a new age in human history. So why does Sept. 17 come and go with so little notice?

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Life and Crimes of Mafia Boss Vincent Gigante'

In the history of America's criminal organization Cosa Nostra, popularly known as the Mafia, Vincent "the Chin" Gigante stands out not only as one of the most powerful and successful bosses, he also stands out as one of the most peculiar.

Scimitar Skyline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The lessons of 9/11 not learned

On Sunday, we observed the 15th anniversary of Sept. 11, the deadliest day in United States history. It is said that those who do not learn from history are destined to repeat it. So what have we learned?

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a rally at Johnson C. Smith University, in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

How Hillary Clinton's economic plan won't work

What makes America an economically ingenious place is the competitive federalism model set forth by our Founding Fathers. They established our nation as the world's largest ever free trade zone in which 50 states competing for jobs and people with varying economic and fiscal policies.

U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran, R-Miss. **FILE (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

A Washington fish story

The catfish is a tasty critter that long ago outlived a less than glorious reputation. The Native American catfish is a sluggard that lives in the bayous and rivers of the Deep South, eager to suck up whatever moves among the tin cans, bottles and accumulated trash on the bottom of the stream (and not to be confused with "catfish" who swim through the internet in pursuit of gamier prey).

Illustration on the current plague of heroin use by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Drug deaths in flyover country

Anne Arundel County, Maryland is an outer suburb of Washington and Baltimore. Formerly, the County Police had a billboard outside their headquarters in Millersville that listed the dead and injured in county auto accidents on a year-to-date basis. The billboard is still there but now it reads "Anne Arundel County Heroin Overdose Awareness." As of late August, the overdoses were 536 and the "Lives Lost" were 78, year-to-date.

Don't sit on the sidelines this election

Donald Trump was not my first choice for Republican presidential candidate. He was not even my 10th choice. I have made the decision not to vote for him. But the current Democratic administration has left our country and the world worse off than we were eight years ago.

Cyber Security Threat Against Elections Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

It matters who counts the votes

The statement, "The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything" is usually attributed to the late Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. Whoever said it, that thought is probably in the mind of Russian President Vladimir Putin as November 8 approaches.