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CORRECTS DATE - President Barack Obama, right, smiles as he and former NBA basketball player Alonzo Mourning, left, prepare to ride in a golf cart while golfing at Vineyard Golf Club in Edgartown, Mass., on the island of Martha's Vineyard, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014. Obama is taking a two-week summer vacation on the island. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

The Obama tee party

Trouble in the St. Louis suburbs has rescued President Obama’s vacation. He can play all 18 holes at the country club now, safe in the knowledge that he’s distracting voters from all the scandals, mismanagement and foreign and domestic policies that are the legacy of his administration.

FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2012 file photo, former Vice President Al Gore, Current TV Chairman and Co-Founder, participates in the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena , Calif. Former Vice President Al Gore is suing Al Jazeera America, saying the news network is withholding tens of millions of dollars that it owes for buying Current TV from him and other shareholders for $500 million last year. (AP Photo/Danny Moloshok, File)

EDITORIAL: Al Gore vs. Al-Jazeera

How do you say “buyer’s remorse” in Arabic? The Qatari royal family likely feels the pangs of regret for paying the princely sum of $500 million to Al Gore and friends to give Al-Jazeera America a slot on satellite-TV and cable channels.

Bogart and Bacall in "To Have and Have Not."

‘Death be not proud’

Robin Williams and Lauren Bacall join this year’s roster of celebrity deaths. Their names and fame preoccupy us in public mourning, though most of us were no closer to them in life than to a movie or television screen.

Expensive Government Music Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A higher scale for music royalties?

Members of Congress are being pressured by lobbyists, songwriters and music-publishing executives to pass legislation artificially forcing copyright royalty rate increases on music.

Tough Pill to Swallow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to slow the pace of medical progress

The Americans infected with the Ebola virus appear to be improving — very welcome news, especially given the virus’s death rate, which is estimated to be as high 90 percent.

NATO Alliance Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

As NATO withers, whither NATO?

As world leaders gather for the NATO summit in Wales during the first week of September, they’ll need to do some collective soul-searching on the alliance’s future.

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2014 file photo, Malik Shabazz, center, president of Black Lawyers for Justice and former chairman of the New Black Panther Party, talks with Col. Ron Replogle, left, and Capt. Ron Johnson during a march with protesters in Ferguson, Mo. Shabazz' organization and others, made up mostly of black volunteers, have taken it upon themselves to help keep the peace in Ferguson, confident the protesters are more likely to listen to them than police. (AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, David Carson, File)

The Ferguson feeding frenzy

The most poisonous “-ism” now infecting Ferguson, Mo., is not virulent racism. It’s viral narcissism.

Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol is surrounded by media after meeting with protesters Monday, Aug. 18, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer has touched off rancorous protests in Ferguson, a St. Louis suburb where police have used riot gear and tear gas. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Media mantra misses the story as Ferguson explodes

Much of the media mantra in Ferguson, Missouri, followed a simple storyline. An 18-year-old black, known to his friends and family as a “gentle giant,” planned to attend college the following week. As he walked down the street with his friend around noon Saturday, Aug. 9, he met a police officer who gunned him down as he tried to surrender with his hands held high.

President Barack Obama, left, points to Sen. Chris Dodd, D-Conn., center, and Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., right, after signing the Dodd Frank-Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in a ceremony in the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, Wednesday, July 21, 2010.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

EDITORIAL: Economic strangulation with red tape

President Obama knows nothing about making the economy grow. On his watch, America’s gross domestic product has inched forward at an annual average of 1.2 percent, according to World Bank data. We’re outclassed not only by Brazil, China and India, but by Mali, Guatemala, Swaziland and Vanuatu.

Gun-grabber Bloomberg’s epic fail in Milwaukee

Billionaire Michael R. Bloomberg could learn a thing or two from the biblical story about an Israelite soldier named David, who went up against Goliath, a giant of a man and a powerful foe.

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Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to gathered participants at the annual gathering of the Clinton Global Initiative America, at the Sheraton Downtown, in Denver, Tuesday, June 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

America likes tell-alls: 60 'best sellers' on the Clintons written since 1992

- The Washington Times

There are three books on the current New York Times top-10 bestseller list that that have something to do with Bill and Hillary Clinton. Those who seek to write a best seller - or even just a snappy paperback with a cool cover - might consider penning something on the Clintons, for better or worse. The numbers back this idea up.

Three Choices Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Sanitizing Islam in textbooks

When shocking events happen, it is worthwhile to consider how future generations will retell them.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Stand Up Straight and Sing'

Jessye Norman is not exactly your typical diva. To begin with, she graduated not from Juilliard or Curtis, but from Howard University, and proudly maintains her ties there.

Mao Zedong

Something heroic for Obama's legacy

- The Washington Times

Unless he can find something and find it quickly, Barack Obama isn't going to like his legacy. The man who once walked on water may soon find himself at the bottom of the lake.

How the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution became a model

Fifty years ago Sunday, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Gulf of Tonkin resolution that authorized him, in the wake of reported North Vietnamese assaults on an American destroyer, to "take all necessary measures to repel an armed attack against the forces of the United States and to prevent further aggression."

Union Intimidation of Day care Provider Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A breath of employee freedom

When the Supreme Court ruled last month that public-sector unions were not allowed to extract dues from payments to home care and child care providers, it was more than a victory for Illinois provider Pamela Harris.

Illustration on Obama's corporate tax antipathy toward business by Jennifer Kohnke/Tribune Content Agency

Derailing the tax-reform train

There's a much bigger, largely untold story behind the renewed debate over U.S. corporations who merge with foreign firms to reduce their federal tax bills.

Illustration on Richard Nixon by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Nixon. Now more than ever

- The Washington Times

Forty years ago this week, President Richard Nixon resigned from office. I was a very young child as I watched him announce his decision to resign on Aug. 8, 1974.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Hamas' self-made predicament

To those who are offended by pictures of casualties in Gaza, I would remind you that the terrorist organization Hamas has set up armed camps, stored rockets and weapons amid civilians, and uses the media to provoke outcries from free-world nations in favor of its self-made, dire predicament.

In this June 30, 2014 photo cans of Coca-Cola soda pop are shown in the refrigerator inside of Chile Lindo in San Francisco. San Francisco and Berkeley are aiming to become the first U.S. cities to pass per-ounce taxes on sugary drinks. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Protecting trade secrets

Two years ago, a Motorola software engineer named Hanjuan Jin was sentenced to four years in prison after she was caught boarding a Beijing-bound flight from Chicago with $30,000 in cash and a carry-on bag full of Motorola documents marked "confidential and proprietary information."

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Fourth Revolution'

"The Fourth Revolution" is about government and ideas. John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, senior editors at The Economist, posit that ''the western state has been through three-and-a-half great revolutions in modern times."

FILE - In this May 22, 2013 file photo, Internal Revenue Service official Lois Lerner refuses to answer questions as the House Oversight Committee holds a hearing to investigate the extra scrutiny the IRS gave Tea Party and other conservative groups that applied for tax-exempt status, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lerner, a former IRS official at the heart of the agency's tea party controversial called Republicans "crazies" and more in newly released emails. Lerner used to head the IRS division that handles applications for tax-exempt status. In a series of emails with a colleague in November 2012, Lerner made two disparaging remarks about members of the GOP, including one remark that was profane. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., released the emails Wednesday as part of his committee's investigation. Camp says the emails show Lerner's disgust with conservatives. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

KARIS: The real agents of the IRS: the best show on television!

The best new reality show on television this season is The Real Agents of the IRS on the Department of Treasury Network, which is owned by Obama, Inc. Unlike all those other Housewives shows, with the fake cooking, lips and sisterhood, these are real people who earn real paychecks from real hardworking American taxpaying citizens. This show has mystery, intrigue and talk of recycling which makes the Green Movement giddy.