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Roger Goodell. (Associated Press)

The NFL owners with a playbook of their own

- The Washington Times

The owners of the National Football League finally came up with a playbook of their own. Beset by players who want to be political commentators who work from their knees, and by angry fans who only want to watch a football game without insult to the country they love, the owners consulted their playbook and think they can run out the clock.

Illustration on the clique of dictators by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating the dictators’ clique

A dictators’ clique of China, Russia, Iran and North Korea threatens democracies everywhere. They are more dangerous than any past dictators because they have or are about to have nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them. The best way for peace-loving nations to oppose these dictators is through a global coalition centered on the United States and Europe. The U.S. and European democracies led coalitions that defeated dictators in the World War I, World War II and the Cold War. They can do it again.

Illustration on police and minorities by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Deadly Democratic cities

After a speech in Middletown, Pennsylvania, this week, President Trump sat for an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity. No doubt it was friendly territory. For the president, Mr. Hannity’s questions were underhand softballs tossed down the center of the plate, and the replies were vintage Trump.

Illustration on the strategic importance of an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward an independent Kurdistan

The autonomous Kurdistan region of northern Iraq held a referendum on independence on Sept. 25. It was overwhelmingly approved. This referendum, not surprisingly however, has precipitously raised tensions not only with Iraq but also with Turkey, Syria and Iran, all of which have large — and restive — Kurdish minorities.

Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men’s lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus — “J’ accuse!” — only because he was a Jew.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that’s wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they’re concerned, he is “the swamp.”

Illustration on the threat of hurricanes to the electrical grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lights that a hurricane can’t blow out

With millions of Americans experiencing power outages due to catastrophic hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, there has never been a more important time to look critically at the reliability and durability of our electrical grid. In Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by Hurricane Maria, reports indicate that it will take months — or even as long as a year — for the power to be fully restored.

Illustration of Fethullah Gulen by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fethullah Gulen, a pious Muslim or a radical Islamist?

Controversial Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is back in the news following a diplomatic standoff between Turkey and the United States. On Oct. 8, the U.S. mission in Turkey announced a decision “to suspend all non-immigrant visa services at all U.S. diplomatic facilities in Turkey,” in retaliation for the arrest of a Drug Enforcement Administration liaison in Turkey with suspected ties to Mr. Gulen. Turkey has answered in kind by freezing the issuance of new visas.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The problem with Obamacare subsidies

Late last week, President Trump signed an executive order directing the secretaries of the Treasury and health and human services to cease making payments to health care insurance companies in behalf of the more than 6 million Americans who qualify for these payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

Claire McCaskill’s crusade could hurt Native American rights

Let’s establish an important legal concept and set the context. The legal term “sovereign immunity,” according to the Wex Legal Dictionary, means that “the government cannot be sued without its consent.” This doctrine has applied to the federal government, states, public universities and Native American tribes for many years.

Saving the nation from the left’s bullies

As we’ve all been understandably focused on Hollywood’s Weinstein dumpster fire, a number of stories have emerged exposing the left’s continuing culture war, despite its meltdown in the film industry.

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Illustration of Harvey Weinstein by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why criticize Harvey Weinstein

Ancient wisdom from a Higher Authority, which is available to anyone who takes the time to consider it, was provided to constrain people like Harvey Weinstein from acts he has been accused of committing.

Barry Goldwater campaigning in 1964     Associated Press photo

Having fun with diagnosing the Donald

- The Washington Times

Witch doctors are not necessarily more skilled than psychiatrists and psychologists, but they're sometimes harder on the pocketbook. A group of "mental-health professionals" have offered to resolve the Donald Trump "problem" for free. In the learned and precise professional language of their trade, they think he's "nuts."

Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah waves to the media as he arrives to head the Cabinet session in Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas' former official resident in Gaza City, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. Hamdallah has held the first government meeting in the Gaza Strip as part of a major reconciliation effort to end the 10-year rift between Fatah and Hamas. (AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra)

Less than meets a wary eye

The deal between Mahmoud Abbas' Palestinian Authority on the West Bank and Hamas in the old Gaza Strip is considerably less valuable than it looks. Although Mr. Abbas' West Bank authority will assume civilian responsibilities there, Hamas will remain in control of security, and will neither lay down its weapons nor dismantle its security forces and militias. Hamas has received arms from Iran in the past and now threatens the entire region.

In this Oct. 7, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks to reporters before leaving the White House in Washington for a brief stop at Andrews Air Force Base in Md., on his way to Greensboro, N.C. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Nixing the Iran nuclear deal

You have to give a little to get a little. That's the art of the deal. But when Barack Obama bargained with Iran's mullahs over their nuclear program, he gave away the store — including the cash drawer — and only got a little time in return before the advent of the Islamic bomb. Buying peril on the lay-away plan does the world no favors. President Trump calls it "the worst deal ever negotiated," and he wants to alter it. To act in the interest of the United States, after all, is his sworn duty as president and commander in chief.

Conservatism betrayed

"How the Right Lost Its Mind" is an important work. Any serious-minded citizen, no matter of what political persuasion, will benefit from reading it and carefully contemplating the powerful message of its thoughtful, solidly conservative author.

Member of the San Francisco 49ers kneel during the playing of the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

SNYDER: Maybe the country needs a football timeout

Roger Goodell and NFL team owners don't want to hear this, but perhaps the nation would benefit from taking a little football break. The reason doesn't matter, even if it's as irrational as opposition to protests during the national anthem.

Accompanied by Puerto Rican Gov. Ricardo Rossello and first lady Beatriz Rossello, U.S. Vice President Mike Pence greets soldiers at the Muniz National Guard Air Base, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017.  The trip comes days after U.S President Donald Trump visited Puerto Rico and praised relief efforts without mentioning the criticism that the federal response has drawn. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

Mike Pence, mocked for principles the left just can't fathom

- The Washington Times

Mike Pence, post-Colts-49ers walkout, has been mocked mercilessly by a vicious left as little more than a media hog and public relations stuntman for daring to leave the game in protest of players' national anthem kneeling. The left, the suspicious, mega-partisan, ever-political left, just can't believe that someone would actually stand on principle.

In this July 25, 2012, file photo, California Gov. Jerry Brown waits for the start of a news conference to announce plans to build a giant twin tunnel system to move water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to farmland and cities, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

California crazy: Calling a 'he-she' a 'he' can now get you jailed

- The Washington Times

It's madness in California, as Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat, of course, just signed into law a bill that creates special rights for LGBT senior-age adults in long-term nursing care that requires them to be referred to by their gender pronouns of choice. Those who don't? It's off to jail they go. Free speech, anyone?

Vice President Mike Pence takes a photo with a fan before an NFL football game between the Indianapolis Colts and the San Francisco 49ers, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

NFL players union still doesn't get it

- The Washington Times

Sunday, Vice President Mike Pence walked out of the Colts-49ers football game after players fell to their knees in protest of the national anthem. Shortly after, the NFL Players Association released a statement of support for the kneelers. Make that: The tone-deaf NFL Players Association released a statement.

Washington Nationals' Bryce Harper watches his two-run homer in the eighth inning in Game 2 of baseball's National League Division Series against the Chicago Cubs, at Nationals Park, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

LOVERRO: Nationals make case for old-school baseball

But if you listened closely enough, you heard cheers for the Nationals Saturday from those around the country in the baseball industry who make their living in hotel rooms at Super 8s and Rodeway Inns, in places like Bozeman, Montana, and Clayton, Alabama.

Illustration on sixties precursors to current violence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Old divisions, renewed violence

Virginia Tech, Newtown, San Bernardino, Orlando, Las Vegas ... a roll call of carnage so familiar that we can almost repeat it in our sleep. We read the number of dead and wounded. But these are really tragedies beyond reckoning, as the tears of loved ones wash upon the shores of illimitable grief.

Kennedy's Unopened Door Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ken Burns, JFK and the unopened door

As a Vietnam veteran, I was reluctant to push the Ken Burns Vietnam documentary film button. Would it be little more than painful propaganda? This apprehension was only half right. It's not propaganda. Every American should see it.

Interfering with Foreign Policy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Foreign policy and opportunistic lawsuits

Navigating the shoals of foreign policy is hard at the best times, especially in the Middle East. It becomes impossible if the courts grab hold of the steering wheel. Yet that is the prospect in a case shortly being considered by the Supreme Court.

Aaron Scott, left, prays during a service conducted by Rev. Sarah Monroe, right, at Chaplains on the Harbor church in Westport, Wash., Thursday, June 15, 2017. "I don't think our politicians know how high the stakes are here, and after so many years have gone by with our situation still as devastated as it is, I don't know if they care," Monroe says. "I'm not sure how much worse it can get, and at the same time I'm afraid to see how much worse it can get." (AP Photo/David Goldman)

At last, a president who protects our fundamental religious freedoms

The men who gathered to create our country and the Constitution were a varied group. Many of them were Christians, but some did not believe in the God of the Old and New Testaments. Yet, they proposed to establish a sovereign nation where people of all faiths and no faith would be welcome; where the freedom of conscience and religion would not be violated by the government. In a miracle of the ages, they succeeded in creating the first nation where both those who believe in God and those who don't are safe from government coercion.

Richard Cohen of the Southern Poverty Law Center. **FILE**

Making money on hate

These are not happy times for the Southern Poverty Law Center, which doesn't have a lot to do with the South, poverty or the law, and it thrives far from the center of the political spectrum. The center is mostly a cash machine, and it has raised hundreds of millions of dollars, mostly from well-meaning but gullible liberals — "progressives" in the current argot — in the name of fighting injustice and hate. Lately it has been called out as a hate group itself.

Left's gun-law hypocrisy

As expected from the radical left, in the face of the tragic mass killings in Las Vegas the words of comfort to the grieving are rushed through to get to the usual political message about guns and the gun lobby. Forgive me, but I would like to offer another view on the subject of taking away our gun rights in order to stop senseless killing.