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President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

A large component of the Obama administration's climate-change agenda is to restrict carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. Washington regulators set a goal of reducing CO2 emissions 30 percent by 2030, which would mostly target abundant and affordable coal-fired generation. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

Global climate policy after Lima

In his State of the Union address, President Obama again confirmed that “saving the climate” remains one of his top priorities. Yet the recently concluded confab in Lima, Peru, didn’t really conclude anything — certainly no binding protocol to limit emissions of carbon dioxide — but “kicked the can down the road” to the next international gabfest in Paris, scheduled for December.

Illustration on the impact of anti-Semitism on France by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘First they came for the Jews’

A widely distributed political cartoon by Ranan Lurie, published after the massacre of four Jews in a kosher supermarket in Paris, depicts a tiny shrub above ground and just below the surface, supporting the plant, is a web of thick twisted roots spread in the design of the swastika.

If you peered into your neighbor's bedroom with a high-tech device, you'd be prosecuted or sued.  MANDATORY CREDIT; MAGS OUT; TV OUT; INTERNET USE BY AP MEMBERS ONLY; NO SALES

Who will keep our freedoms safe?

While the Western world was watching and grieving over the slaughter in Paris last week, and my colleagues in the media were fomenting a meaningless debate about whether President Obama should have gone to Paris to participate in a televised parade, the feds took advantage of that diversion to reveal even more incursions into our liberties than we had known about.

Related Articles

ATSC standard protects consumers

In "TV digital streaming technology speeds past FCC License rule" (Web, Jan. 1) it is not clear whether op-ed writer Andrew Langer's intention is to argue for a change in law or to malign MPEG LA with incorrect and misleading information. Although the former — whether over-the-air broadcast TV services should be freely accessible through every TV set sold in the United States — may be a subject of fair debate, the latter is deceitful and irresponsible.

France weighs the tragic cost of appeasement

The attack on the offices and staff of the French satirical paper, Charlie Hebdo, by three heavily armed men shouting out the name of God in Arabic is nothing less than a declaration of war by hordes of heathen barbarians against the civilized world. They would want us to think that they are acting in the name of God.

FILE - This is a Friday, Oct. 17, 2014 file photo of Russian President Vladimir Putin and French President Francois Hollande, right, during a meeting on the sidelines of the  ASEM summit of European and Asian leaders in Milan, northern Italy. EU sanctions against Russia over the crisis in Ukraine are cutting both ways and pinching some big European companies. But economic relief isn't likely any time soon, diplomats and analysts say: EU rules make the sanctions tough to overturn.  France, Germany, Russia and Ukraine are trying to set up talks in Astana, Kazakhstan, toward easing the tensions behind sanctions that have hit Russia's economy, sent the ruble sinking and affected corporate Europe _ including banks, oil companies, machinery makers and food giants.    (AP Photo/Daniel Dal Zennaro, Pool, File)

The curious case of Vlad the Embezzler

Beware of historians bearing analogies. If every two-bit dictator whom post-World War II pundits and scholars have compared to Hitler or Stalin packed even a tenth of the wallop of the originals, we would all have been engulfed in World War III years ago. The latest dictator to come in for the Hitler-Stalin treatment is that indubitably bad, more than a little power-mad master of the Kremlin, Vladimir Putin.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks at the Congressional Black Caucus ceremonial swearing-in ceremony, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke)

Democrats running on empty

As the Republicans settle into the House of Representatives and the Senate, with their largest House margin in 86 years and about as healthy a margin in the Senate as they could have gained in 2014, the talk in major media is of the Republicans' many problems. As The Washington Post put it in a front-page headline, "Rancor in GOP flares ... ." The Democrats should suffer from such "rancor."

The tiny nano-drone Zano promises to take the ultimate selfie. (Lantronix)

Dronies, anyone? Tiny drone packed with technology aspires to deliver the ultimate selfie

- The Washington Times

Now creating buzz: Zano, a powerful little drone that comes with a promise: "Taking your selfies to new heights." It can perch on a palm then rise up to snap high quality still or video images with a 5-megapixel camera. "Oh, the noble quest for the perfect selfie," says Jill Scharr, a staff writer for Tom's Guide, an industry review. "Meet the Zano, a camera-equipped drone barely bigger than a person's hand, and designed to let users take high-quality photos that even a selfie stick can't reach."

People gather outside the French Consulate in Toronto on Wednesday Jan. 7, 2015 in response to the shootings earlier in the day at Charlie Hebdo Magazine in Paris. The writing on the signs reads "I am Charlie." (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Chris Young)

Massacre in Paris

The boldness and the brutality of the Islamist terrorists know no bounds, and neither, until now, has the reluctance of the West to confront evil in whatever guise it presents itself.

Mario Cuomo            Associated Press photo

Nixon, Cuomo and me

One summer morning in 2009, my cellphone beeped with a message. The voice at the other end was deep, resonant, authoritative but friendly.

'Gitmo' more dangerous open

Your recent editorial "Guantanamo terrorists leave, threat to America grows" (Web, Jan. 4) exaggerates the risk of releasing prisoners from Guantanamo and ignores the threat of keeping them there. The recidivism rate for Guantanamo detainees released under President Obama is not 30 percent, but 6.4 percent. Further, detainees are not released at random. They must be cleared unanimously for release by the agencies and departments in charge of our national security: the departments of Defense, Homeland Security, Justice and State, as well as the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

National Debt Comparison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the national debt was zero

On Jan. 8, 1835, the U.S. national debt stood at zero, the first and only time in its history. It was a remarkable turnabout from Jan. 1, 1791, when the federal government was in debt to the tune of $75,463,476.52. But that wasn't the peak amount of indebtedness for the new nation ($120 million), which occurred at the end of the three-year War of 1812.

Bess Myerson, Miss America 1945             Associated Press photo

Bess Myerson, first Jewish Miss America, dies at 90

Bess Myerson, whose death at age 90 was revealed this week, was a Miss America who lived through nearly a century of change in the perception of "the ideal American woman." She paid for celebrity in the way many celebrities before and after her paid. She was crowned in 1945, when the Miss America Pageant was taken more seriously than it is today, and she was anything but the typical "queen of femininity."

A bullet impact is seen in a window of a building next to the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday. Masked gunmen shouting "Allahu akbar!" stormed the Paris offices of a satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 12 people, including the paper's editor, before escaping in a getaway car. (Associated press)

A courageous voice from inside Islam

How long will this sort of thing keep going on? While the Islamic State busily beheads Iraqi children who refuse to renounce their Christian faith, their Islamist brethren in Paris pursue their own jihadi offensive. Twelve people were massacred Wednesday in an attack targeting a weekly humor magazine famous for publishing satirical images of the Prophet Muhammad. Their battle cry: "The prophet has been avenged!"

Lamenting liberty lost

A British author, residing in the United States for the past 30 years, created a small firestorm earlier this week with his candid observations that modern-day Americans have been duped by the government into accepting a European-style march toward socialism because we fail to appreciate the rich legacy of personal liberty that is everyone's birthright and is expressly articulated in the Declaration of Independence and guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

CRomnibus' supporters deserve firing

I have come to the conclusion that not only am I an "extremist" in the eyes of the mainstream media and some politicians, but so, too, are 90-plus-percent of Americans, since most would never support voting for legislation they have not read. Yet both Democrats and Republicans believe this is an acceptable practice.

Chickens huddle in their cages at an egg processing plant at the Dwight Bell Farm in Atwater, Calif. The New Year is bringing rising chicken egg prices across the country as California starts requiring farmers to house hens in cages with enough space to move around and stretch their wings. The new standard backed by animal rights advocates has drawn fire nationwide because farmers in Iowa, Ohio and other states who sell eggs in California have to abide by the same requirements. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez,File)

Breaking eggs in California

You can't make an omelet without breaking a few eggs, as the Marxists are fond of saying to explain their brutal "persuasion," but if you can't afford breakfast you won't have to worry about the litter of the eggshells.

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., center, with Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., right, greets fellow lawmakers on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, as the House of Representatives gathered for the opening session of the 114th Congress. Scalise, the third ranking in the House GOP leadership, has been battling a scandal over a 2002 speech to a white supremacist group in Louisiana but he has received support from both Republicans and Democrats on the Hill.   (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The smearing of Steve Scalise

During the past year, there were some false stories (University of Virginia's rape case) and disputed facts (actress Lena Dunham's "Republican" rapist) that liberal media organizations simply accepted or didn't properly investigate.

Illustration on Republican plans to use "veto bait" against Obama by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Combining forces for growth

Republicans took control of Congress this week, mindful that their job performance over the next two years will determine their party's path to the presidency in 2016.

Restoring the Senate

The U.S. Senate stands at the crossroads of American politics. Its very creation was the linchpin of the Great Compromise that produced our Constitution. The Senate was to serve as a "necessary fence" against what the Framers described as the "fickleness and passion" that drives popular pressure for hasty and ill-considered lawmaking — what Edmund Randolph famously called "the turbulence and follies of democracy."