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George H. W. Bush   Associated Press photo

Weak, confused and ‘unable to grasp’

- The Washington Times

Many bad things happen when a leader is weak, confused and forever in search of a credible reason to do nothing. For all his softness on Islam, Barack Obama has little insight into the men who send out mobs to cry “death to America.” He can’t imagine that men can listen to the call to evening Muslim prayer, which so captivated him as a boy growing up in Indonesia — “the prettiest sound on Earth” — and be inspired to dream of bringing down death on America.

Illustration on NOAA's climate change fictions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

NOAA’s climate change science fiction

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is the nation’s leading collector of climate data. Every day, NOAA analyzes vast amounts of data to predict changes to our climate, weather, oceans and coasts. The agency also publishes monthly temperature averages across the nation and compares those numbers to historical temperature records.

The Invincible Obama Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Behind Obama’s lack of leadership

President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki killed more than 200,000 civilians but stopped a war that had already killed tens of millions and could have wiped out millions more.

Illustration on Obama's undermining Arctic oil exploration and production by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tapping into energy obstructionism

When the Obama administration moved to embrace offshore energy exploration in Alaska earlier this year, skeptics raised a leery eyebrow. Could an administration so hostile to fossil fuels actually change its stripes?

U.S.-Iran Policy Paradox Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Mideast paradox

Most students of Physics 101 have been exposed to a well-known thought experiment called “Schrodinger’s Cat.” In this experiment, renowned Danish physicist Erwin Schrodinger illustrates an absurd feature of quantum theory that allows a hypothetical cat to be both be alive and dead at the same time. This, however, is impossible, a paradox.

Illustration on giving thanks for the American military by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Grateful for American muscle

We Americans have much to be grateful for. Every year we gather together with friends and family to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday. When we do, we should be grateful as well for the service of the American military in far-flung outposts.

Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen answers to the House Oversight Committee in the panel's continuing probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the government's tax agency, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Earlier this month, IRS official Lois Lerner was called to testify about the controversy but refused to answer questions by committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and invoked her Fifth Amendment rights at least nine times. Associated Press Photo

Impeach IRS chief John Koskinen

After revelations that the Internal Revenue Service was restricting political speech and targeting conservative and tea party groups, John Koskinen was appointed to head the agency, promising reform and transparency.

The monument to General Gouverneur K. Warren at Gettysburg     The Washington Times

A Thanksgiving message in bronze

In the fall of 1865, America marked its first Thanksgiving since the end of the Civil War. Seven months earlier, after Robert E. Lee had surrendered on April 9, the North held a spontaneous jubilee. Cannons boomed, fireworks illuminated the night sky, bands played, people sang in the streets and crowds cheered the savior of the Union, Abraham Lincoln.

Religious Roots of Thanksgiving Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Proclaiming a day of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the time when America’s religious roots and traditions are publicly displayed. While we think of feasting at tables filled with food and drink, and imagine the Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony inviting neighboring Indians to join them to celebrate a plentiful harvest, Thanksgiving Day has a much more religious meaning. It was not uncommon in the 17th and 18th centuries for individual colonies to set aside days for prayers of gratitude to our Lord.

An American flag sits in front of gravestones on Veterans Day at San Francisco National Cemetery in the Presidio of San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

A refugee’s tale of Thanksgiving

As I grew up in America, I came to realize that the most effective antidote for fear is not courage, but gratitude.

Illustration on the processing of national security intelligence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to presidential campaign advisers

This memorandum is addressed to the brave souls advising presidential candidates. As you know, the recent terrorist attacks in France — and in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Israel — have altered the political landscape. With less than a year to go before the 2016 election, the landscape may stay altered even if there are no more attacks — and that seems unlikely.

Related Articles

Illustration on students' entitlement mentality on college campuses by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The closing of the American mouth

College kids do the darndest things. You send them away to open up their minds and they learn to close them, for themselves and for others. The tantrum generation just managed a left-wing coup at the University of Missouri, stifling freedom of expression and forcing out the president and chancellor of the university.

Rotten to the Core Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Common Core's double whammy

Some of the most reliable yardsticks in monitoring academic progress in K-12 education are the assessments known as the Nation's Report Card, officially the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The results from its 2015 assessments are in, and they are not encouraging.

Historic Defense Dept. image of a Dust Off air evacuation crew in action during the Vietnam War. The primary transport was the The Bell UH-1 Iroquois "Huey" helicopter - the air ambulance.

Hooah: Vietnam-era 'Dustoff' air ambulance crews nominated for Congressional Gold Medal

- The Washington Times

Sens. John Cornyn and Joe Manchin have introduced legislation to award an elite group of Vietnam veterans with the Congressional Gold Medal. That would be the tenacious "Dust Off" crews, who drew their name from the U.S. Army 57th Medical Detachment's radio call sign and fearlessly flew unarmed air ambulances into combat to rescue and evacuate the wounded. Their airborne mission has roots dating back to World War II.

Ben Carson Under the Biased Microscope Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Carson, clean in comparison

Last week I wrote in this column that Ben Carson, a leading Republican candidate for the presidency, was an "American hero." I pronounced him thus even as the roof was falling in on his candidacy.

One Percent Veteran Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The other 'one percent'

We hear a lot today from our politicians about the evil, greedy "one percent." But instead of pitting Americans against each other for political gain, our leaders ought to be focusing on the one percent that unites these United States and keeps us all safe, secure and prosperous.

Illustration on demagoguery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The terrible cost of demagoguery

President Obama's justification for nixing the Keystone XL pipeline was yet another example of Oval Office demagoguery -- a destructive impulse also rampant among those vying to succeed him.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Christmas Truce: Myth, Memory and the First World War'

"History has a double role: to destroy the illusions of the past and to create out of the debris a more extended, a more rational, a more detached sense of human destiny," the British historian Lady Elizabeth Longford wrote in her biography of the Duke of Wellington.

Fund public transit now

It's time for Congress to get serious about investing in public transit. It's good news that both the House and Senate have passed multi-year transportation bills, but it's not enough simply to move forward with the same transportation strategy we've always had.

U.S. can still fix Iran deal

President Obama may not have any interest in war, but war may have an interest in him, as the old Russian proverb goes. Congress and the next president must correct the dangerous Obama defense policy on ground forces before it does real harm to the U.S. military.

In this picture released by the official website of the office of the Iranian supreme leader, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei delivers a speech during a meeting in Tehran, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015.  (Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP)

Submission to tyrants

When the nation's negotiators shake on a deal at the bargaining table, the result ought to be peace and good feeling. But not when one of the parties agreeing to peace in our time is the Islamic Republic of Iran. Once it signed its long-sought nuclear deal with the United States and its global partners, the mullahs went home to search for more rope.

Members of Concerned Student 1950, University of Missouri's Graduate Professional Council, faculty and student supporters gather at Mel Carnahan Quadrangle to rally in support of an ongoing protest to get UM System President Tim Wolfe to resign on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Tensions have been rising throughout the week following MU student Jonathan Butler's decision to hold a hunger strike Monday, Nov. 1. In response to today's protest and the Missouri football athlete strike, President Wolfe did announce his decision to resign. (Matt Hellman/Missourian via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Mob rule on campus

If the campus is an accurate reflection of the rising generation, the nation has frightful prospects. The "kids" are in the streets again, trying to reprise the fun of the '60s, long before they were born, but the decade that formed many of their professors.

Illustration on Obama's plan to issue millions of H visas to illegal aliens by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Work permit palooza

Overreach has defined President Obama. Now determined to accomplish through regulation with a Republican Congress what he failed to do through legislation with a Democratic one, Mr. Obama may soon attempt another overhaul of America's immigration system.

The saga of the Vietnam vet

"Pow" is the sound of a muffler blast from a past-its-prime car. Suddenly, you're face down on the sidewalk, biting gritty cement, with one arm outstretched and the other bent firmly against your side. As you lay on the cold winter concrete reaching for a weapon that doesn't exist, you look up to see two somewhat familiar men in business attire.