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George McGovern    Associated Press photo

The sad tale of two stumbling parties

- The Washington Times

We’ve heard the words and music of this song before. The hoariest cliche in American politics, presented as accomplished fact by every wise head in academe and media after every wipe-out election, is that the losing party is finished. Kaput. Destroyed. Done for. Dead, as in the graveyard.

Royhingya refugees from Myanmar receiving food from Bangladeshi aid workers          Associated Press photo

A refugee emergency and the terrorism it breeds

Bangladesh has been a haven for the Rohingya people since they began fleeing unprovoked oppression in their home state of Rakhine on Myanmar’s western shore, bordering Bangladesh, in 2015. Denied citizenship in their own country, the Rohingya have been in conflict not only with the other citizens of Rakhine but also with the government of Myanmar, which considers many of them to be anti-government insurgents. The United Nations describes the Rohingya as one of the world’s most persecuted people.

Trump's Door and Wall Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MAGA and DACA

What does it mean to ‘Make America Great Again’? That’s a seemingly simple question with no simple answer, but an important part of it is certainly fixing our broken systems.

Illustration on possible solutions to the North Korea situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump, the statesman, at the U.N.

President Trump is right. His speech at the United Nations was his third act of Reagan-like statesmanship, after the historically accurate, morally rooted and inspirational speeches in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and Warsaw, Poland. This time, he pointedly spoke for those who cannot speak in Iran, North Korea, Venezuela, and suppressed people around the world. It was a tour de force, and it’s hard to disagree with any word. Once again, Ronald Reagan would be nodding.

Illustration on Russia's attacks on Ukraine by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Taking Putin seriously

President Trump mentioned the word sovereignty 21 times in his address to the United Nations Tuesday, but said little about Russia’s efforts to seize parts of Ukraine, piece by piece, and threaten other neighboring states.

In this June 2, 2017, file photo, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Scott Pruitt, in fight for EPA life — literally

- The Washington Times

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has apparently generated so much controversy that radical green peeps are threatening him with near-regularity, to the point he’s now getting extra armed protection. Seriously, folks, some perspective, please. Are trees that important?

Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year’s presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump’s favor.

Courage and Vision of Columbus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Good-bye, Columbus

With Columbus Day upon us leftist rage is approaching gale force. Blinded by their irrational hatred they denounce Columbus and the civilization he symbolized for every ill ever visited upon this hemisphere. They are domestic Taliban, whose goal is the cultural obliteration of our society.

A protester is silhouetted as he carries the United Nations flag during a rally against Nigerian President Buhari as pedestrians walk through federal plaza Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Jarring minds with facts, not fists

The economics of free speech have become quite strange. It took $600,000, a sea of police officers in riot gear and concrete barricades to ensure Berkeley didn’t devolve into anarchy and chaos when conservative political commentator Ben Shapiro came to town last week. Demonstrations outside remained mostly peaceful with only nine arrests. This, however, is a troubling sign in light of what comes next on Berkeley’s campus.

Illustration on John Dickinson     The Washington Times

Planting the seeds of American independence

This year marks the 250th anniversary of one of the most influential series of writings in American history: the first of John Dickinson’s Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, which appeared in 1767.

Then-first lady Barbara Bush and then-Missouri Gov. John Ashcroft attend a "Parents as Teachers" event in Florissant, Missouri, where Mrs. Bush reads to the children. (National Archives)

Reading is still fundamental, even amid hurricanes

- The Washington Times

Christian and Skyler were anxious. The 5-year-old Texas twins were set to enter kindergarten — until Hurricane Harvey ripped their world. Their school is among five north of Corpus Christi that remain shuttered, having lost heating and air conditioning systems, roofs, electrical systems and much of what ordinarily defines a schoolhouse, including children, teachers and books.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters about the Graham-Cassidy health care bill during a meeting with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump takes leadership reins, pushes top items of agenda

First, President Trump marshalled the full attention and focus of the federal government in response to hurricanes Harvey and Irma, winning broad praise for the federal government’s response. Criticism has not come, despite the size and scope of the storms and the harsh partisan atmosphere.

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Illustration on China's OBER projects by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The duplicitous purpose of 'One Belt, One Road'

"President Xi Jinping's proposal of 'One Belt, One Road' is the most significant and far-reaching initiative that China has ever put forward," wrote influential Chinese Ambassador Wu Jianmin in a 2015 China-U.S. Focus article. Despite official efforts to present OBOR as just an Eurasian economic development initiative, it is a steppingstone to making China a global power. The United States should offer a revived Trans-Pacific Partnership as a superior alternative for Asia's development.

In this undated photo provided on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017 by Hellas Gold company, an aerial view of a gold mine complex in Skouries, in the Halkidiki peninsula, northern Greece. Canadian mining company Eldorado Gold on Monday threatened to suspend a major investment in Greece in ten days, accusing the government of delaying permits and licenses. (Hellas Gold via AP)

A surprising solution to illegal immigration

As Western states prove incapable of deporting their millions of illegal migrants -- the current crisis features Italy -- authorities in Greece have found a surprising and simple way to convince them to take the long route back home.

Illustration on Paul Ryan's predicament by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Paul Ryan problem

It is tough to play hardball with your friends. Have you ever known someone who was exceptionally smart, very personable and highly accomplished, but was not particularly good at managing a large number of independently minded people? I have. His name is Paul Ryan.

An honest accounting of a skillful tactician

At a time when our history books and biographies are being revised at warp speed by practitioners of identity politics and a generation of academics fearful of being accused of being politically incorrect and losing their jobs, Craig Shirley stands out as an honest and highly talented biographer who is also a man of conviction.

Addy Valdez, 12, holds her cousin, Jasmine, while her family starts to clean up the damage from Hurricane Irma in Everglades City, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (Katie Klann/Naples Daily News via AP)

Disasters and dopes

Disaster comes in a variety of heartbreaking shapes and sizes, all of them unwelcome. Some, like global warming, are the work of nature; others are man-made. A little bit of rationality is all it takes to figure out which is which. But recent events suggest that the day they were handing out common sense some people stepped up to the nonsense window instead.

Police and fire vehicles shield the view of a trailer home where five children died in a house fire in The Butte, Alaska, on Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. Officials believes the victims were five girls, all between the ages of 3 and 12. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

Racing to the self-driving car

The freedom of the open road holds a magnetic appeal for Americans, quickening like the flood when Henry Ford unleashed his Model T, but exhilaration can't be traded for the convenience of the "safety" of a car that drives itself. Such a car is a measure of progress only if it works.

Give Lee credit for contributions

The pell-mell rush to remove any public reference to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee is as thoughtless as it is short-sighted. There were reasons other than romanticizing slavery that led to honoring Lee. The post-war Lee is a figure that all Americans should appreciate.

Bolster Japan to weaken N. Korea

As a counterweight to China and North Korea we should encourage Japan to build up its military capabilities. Japan should increase its front-line military personnel from 250,000 to 350,000 and increase the number of tanks from 700 to 1,000 and armored vehicles from 3,000 to 4,000.

In this April 29, 2017, file photo, Steve Bannon, chief White House strategist to President Donald Trump, tours The AMES Companies, Inc., with the president in Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Steve Bannon-CBS takeaway: Swamp creatures are winning

- The Washington Times

Steve Bannon, in an interview with Charlie Rose on "60 Minutes" on CBS, said elites in the Republican Party have been steadily working to "nullify" the results of the 2016 election, and cast President Donald Trump to the side. It doesn't get any clearer -- or more honest -- than that.

Washington Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins walks out of a tunnel to the field before an NFL football game against the Philadelphia Eagles, Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, in Landover, Md. (AP Photo/Mark Tenally)

LOVERRO: Cousins loses Week 1 to Bruce Allen

The referendum on 29-year-old Cousins continues, and you would be hard-pressed to find many voters not named Cousins to cast their ballot to make the man the highest paid player in NFL history after Sunday's opening game defeat.

Uncle Sam from the illustration by James Montgomery Flagg

How Uncle Sam became an icon

No tribute was more moving after Americans witnessed the horror of Sept. 11, 2001, than Queen Elizabeth II breaking tradition two days later by having the Star-Spangled Banner played at the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace before a crowd of some 5,000 tearful Americans.

Illustration on Taiwanese prosperity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How agricultural trade cements the Taiwan-U.S. bond

In mid-September, another big delegation of the Agricultural Trade Goodwill Mission from Taiwan will come to Washington D.C. to sign the Letters of Intent between Taiwan and U.S. agricultural associations for a total purchase of approximately $3 billion worth of soybeans, corn and wheat to be delivered over the next two years.

Illustration on Edward Snowden and the NSA leak by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Traitor, thief, scoundrel, spy

My role in the Vietnam War was a minor one. I served as an 18-year-old seaman in the radio communication division aboard the USS Kitty Hawk as the aircraft carrier performed combat operations on "Yankee Station" off the coast of Vietnam in 1970 and 1971.

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner watched Donald Trump fill out his papers to be on the nation's earliest presidential primary ballot in 2015. Mr. Gardner says he will remain on the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, though he disagrees with voter fraud allegations made by the panel's vice chairman about his state. (Associated Press/File)

The old vote scam in the mountains

Here are some connect-the-dot facts: The New Hampshire-Massachusetts border is a mere 40-minute drive for civic-minded progressives in Boston. The Granite State has same-day registration, which means you can register to vote and then cast a ballot on the same day.

Illustration on economic growth since Trump's election by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Trump boom arrives

Anyone noticed through the fog of Russia, Comey, Charlottesville, and now two monster hurricanes that the U.S. economy is booming faster than any time since the late Clinton years?