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Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Chamber of Corporate Welfare

Here’s a half-serious question: How much do taxpayers have to pay off Boeing to make the Export-Import Bank — finally and irrevocably — go away? If the feds wrote a check to Boeing for $100 million, would they then let the Ex-Im Bank die a merciful and long overdue death?

Illustration on the abuse of citizens' rights under current government surveillance laws by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A better Patriot Act

Critical parts of the USA Patriot Act are about to expire. The reauthorization bill moving through Congress, the USA Freedom Act, has sparked controversy on both sides of the political aisle and within the civil-libertarian community, rekindling debates that began more than a decade ago. Now is the chance to implement much-needed reforms, including reforms to a provision not expiring: the one authorizing National Security Letters (NSL).

Paying heed to the walking wounded

A few days ago I received a thank you note from an American soldier who has been struggling with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As with many victims of TBI and PTSD, it had taken him a while to realize the true nature of his injury and to seek professional help.

White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, shown in this video image, says during his Feb. 3, 1999, deposition that President Clinton lied to him. The videotape was part of House Manager Rep. James Rogan's, D-Calif., presentation in the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton, Saturday, Feb. 6, 1999, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

Flying as close to the flame as Hillary dares

- The Washington Times

Everything about the Clintons, both Hillary and Bubba, is a lie, including (to steal a memorable line from the author Mary McCarthy) the “a,” the “and,” and the “the.” Neither Bubba nor Hillary know how to tell the truth, but both of them are masters at spinning the lie.

Bloody Hand of ISIS in the Mideast Illustration by M Ryder

ISIS attacks on the West

The May 3 assault on a Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas, prompted much discussion about the assailants’ connections to the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, ISIL and Daesh. Did ISIS run them as agents? Are they part of a new network of terror in the West?

Illustration about the abuse of Sixth Amendment rights in misdemeanor cases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Shining a light on 10 million criminal prosecutions

Adding to the growing momentum in Congress for bipartisan criminal justice reform, last week the Senate Judiciary Committee held a first-of-its-kind hearing to shine much-needed light on pervasive — and largely unexamined — problems in the largest segment of our criminal justice system. Republican Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa heard expert testimony describing widespread violations around the country of the Sixth Amendment right to legal counsel for Americans charged with misdemeanors.

Bringing Children into the World Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Are embryos persons or property?

Much of the media has ridiculed businessman Nick Loeb, the former fiance of actress Sofia Vergara, the star of the sitcom “Modern Family,” because he filed a lawsuit to prevent Ms. Vergara from destroying the frozen embryos they created together in 2013. But many in the pro-life community have rallied behind him, viewing the embryos that were created by Mr. Loeb and Ms. Vergara as persons deserving protection by the state.

**FILE** The sign for the National Labor Relations Board is seen outside the organization's headquarters in downtown Washington on July 17, 2013. (Associated Press)

Labor board overreach

Last month, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), stacked with Democratic appointees loyal to Big Labor, enacted new procedures to govern unionization elections.

Reform of the Criminal Justice System Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A ‘safety valve’ for mandatory minimum sentences

In the waning days of Maryland’s legislative session, casual observers were probably surprised to see a freshman, conservative Republican from Western Maryland leading the fight on the Senate floor to reform our state’s harsh mandatory minimum laws. In fact, I was joined by a majority of Republicans in the Senate in voting for this important reform.

Bill de Blasio     Associated Press photo

The false god of politics

Far-left politicians apparently believe that their philosophy is not receiving the worship it is due, despite a track record of failure.

Obama's economic legacy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Omens from Obama’s crumbling economy

President Obama, looking for a legacy, may soon find himself running from one. Americans forgive few things less than a poor economic performance, and Mr. Obama has presided over one throughout his presidency. However, as 2015’s first-quarter results show a stalled economy that threatens to go into reverse, Mr. Obama could finally feel the fallout — not owing to just today’s economy, but his entire presidency’s.

Illustration on Justice Ginsburg's bias in the pending decision on homosexual marriage     The Washington Times

Partial to gay marriage

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not an impartial jurist — not when it comes to the same-sex “marriage” cases, at least. Everyone knows it. Instead of giving confidence to the American public by being above reproach while the same-sex “marriage” cases are being considered, Justice Ginsburg is going out of her way to embarrass the court with unethical antics aimed at assuring pro-same-sex “marriage” supporters and humiliating opponents.

Related Articles

Illustration on oil's practical superiority to so-called green energy sources by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Promoters of renewable energy failed to account for the return of cheap oil

The green energy movement in America is dead. May it rest in peace. No, a majority of American energy over the next 20 years is not going to come from windmills and solar panels. One important lesson to be learned from the green energy fad's rapid and expensive demise is that central planning doesn't work.

Illustration on the aims of an Arab summit by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama will reject any pact at Arab summit that could threaten his Iran nuclear deal

In a Camp David summit meeting Thursday, leaders of Saudi Arabia and other Arab nations will attempt to persuade President Obama to enter into a military agreement to counteract the inevitable consequences of his nuclear weapons deal with Iran. This is their final opportunity to do so before the scheduled June 30 completion of that agreement.

Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., waves to supporters as he arrives to speak at a rally at Arizona State University Friday, May 8, 2015, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Age counts: 92 percent of Americans prefer a presidential candidate under 60

- The Washington Times

How old is too old to run for president? Americans have an age range in mind. Consider that the current crop of presidential hopefuls ranges in age from 43 to 75 -- and in the middle is Gov. Scott Walker checking in at 47, Martin O'Malley at 53, Jeb Bush at 63, Hillary Clinton at 67. But now there's a YouGov poll revealing what age Americans actually prefer.

Abraham Lincoln (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Liberals enabled the rise of 'transgenderism'

- The Washington Times

The "progressives," who were "liberals" before they stunk up the word so bad that even they couldn't take it any longer, invented identity politics, which encourages everyone to find a grievance and build his/her/its identity around it. We're almost there.

FILE - In this March 17, 2015 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. McConnell and GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz are among 57 Republicans in Congress who are calling on the Supreme Court to uphold state bans on same-sex marriage. (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)

Big Brother takes a hit

Sen. Mitch McConnell, the Republican majority leader, has made it clear to his colleagues that he wants the USA Patriot Act, including the controversial parts of the legislation scheduled to expire at the end of June, fully extended. He's seems ready to do whatever he can to get his way.

Hillary Rodham Clinton (right) shares a word with Huma Abedin, her personal assistant and trusted confidant. **FILE**

Hillary's Islamic connection

So many lies, coincidences and distractions, so little time. Perhaps the most serious (who can keep count?) of the new Hillary revelations are that Huma Abedin's emails are among the missing from Hillary's private email server. Were Ms. Abedin's emails trashed to cover a conflict of interest when she was taking pay as a private consultant while on the State Department payroll as an aide to Hillary?

Former President Ronald Reagan. (Associated Press)

Rebuilding rather than ranting

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, an avowed socialist, is running for president on what he says are the biggest threats to our country's future: billionaires and corporate America.

Reconnecting labor spending with members' interests

The Laborers Union is bucking orthodoxy and a temporary AFL-CIO spending moratorium. They are steering the majority of their political contributions to candidates based not on their party affiliations, but on their positions that matter to union members.

Illustration on a balanced federal budget by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Getting serious about balancing the budget

This week, Congress approved its first balanced 10-year budget since 2001, which represented an important step toward putting our country on not just another course, but a better course. This balanced budget represents a "lean in" moment for a Congress under new management, to confront rapidly growing deficits borne from our government's habitual overspending, which plagues America and its taxpayers.

Illustration on the need for a Winston Churchill Day by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Remembering V-E Day

Seventy years ago on Friday, Winston Churchill, stood on a balcony of London's Whitehall, gazed down at the surging, cheering crowd celebrating the surrender of Nazi Germany.

Following the trajectory of American song

If you love music, especially if you've been following its twists and turns and ever-changing styles all through your life, you will want to read "The B-Side: The Death of Tin Pan Alley and the Rebirth of the Great American Song."

Illustration on Victory Day in Russia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Russia's tone-deaf military celebration

Two years ago, I stood in Moscow's Red Square, a privileged spectator at the annual May 9 Victory Day, Russia's version of V-E Day, which features a parade commemorating the defeat of Nazi Germany.

Rawlings-Blake tries to change subject

The call by Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for a federal investigation into police "use of force" should be a call for laughter as the height of gall ("Baltimore mayor wins praise for seeking federal police probe," Web, May 7). There is the little matter of the department being Ms. Rawlings-Blake's own. She directed it to stand down and give rioters a chance to burn down 100 or so businesses. Of course, as preached and demonstrated consistently by the Democrats, there is no such thing as personal responsibility.

Vote for U.S. in 2016

Like most socialists, Hillary Rodham Clinton considers illegal entry across our borders migration where folks just wander around the planet like locusts, feeding, destroying and moving on ("Hillary Clinton rejects Bill's immigration crackdown, vows lenient approach," Web, May 4). Of course Mrs. Clinton does not want these particular "locusts" to move on.

President Barack Obama waves from the doorway of Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Monday, May 4, 2015. Obama is flying to New York City. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Rev up Air Force One; Obama off to Oregon and South Dakota -- fundraiser included

- The Washington Times

Rev up Air Force One. President Obama journeys to Oregon on Thursday for two reasons. First he'll attend a Democratic National Committee fundraiser at a hotel in Portland to support the organization's 2016 White House Victory Fund - tickets up to $10,000 each. Then it's on to Nike headquarters in Beaverton on Friday to talk up "progressive, high-standards trade agreements that would open up new markets and support high-quality jobs for businesses large and small," according to the White House.