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Illustration on Iranian manipulation of the U.S. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new Persian empire

Eleven years ago, Henry Kissinger famously said that Iran’s rulers must “decide whether they are representing a cause or a nation.” If the latter, Iranian and American interests would be “compatible.” As for the former: “If Tehran insists on combining the Persian imperial tradition with contemporary Islamic fervor, then a collision with America is unavoidable.”

Illustration on Hillary's newest book by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Hillary, here is what happened’

What did I tell you? Late in November of last year, after the presidential election that finally ended the Clintons’ 24-year pursuit of power in Washington and their diminishment of the Democratic Party, I wrote that the Clintons were finished. I had consulted my sources. What is more, I reported that on election night Hillary had a “meltdown.” That is why she never showed up to thank her supporters who were milling around New York City’s Javits Center all night. Few others in the media reported it. Yet now I have still more evidence, provided by Hillary herself.

Easy Pickin's Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The real danger to U.S. national security

President Lyndon Baines Johnson (LBJ) was usually more interested in delivering tirades than seeking advice, but in February 1968 LBJ needed answers. According to Gen. William Westmoreland, the commander of U.S. Forces in Vietnam, the unanticipated Tet Offensive had transformed the Vietnam War. If LBJ wanted to win the war in Vietnam, Westmoreland and the Joint Chiefs insisted they needed 200,000 more troops.

Food as a Weapon Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to force regime change in North Korea

With the latest provocative firing by North Korea of an ICBM missile on Sept. 14, 2017 over the Japanese island of Hokkaido, it should be clear to any thinking individual that economic sanctions will not work. We have to face facts. North Korea is doing exactly what China and Russia want it to do.

A Chinese honor guard member is caught in his flag as he stands at attention during a welcome ceremony for Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Assessing Chinese imperialism

If you have not heard of One Belt, One Road you are missing what could be the landmark tale of this entire century. It is a saga of China’s grand strategy that could threaten American interests at every level.

Stem Cell Research at the NIH Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seeking pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health

Dr. Francis Collins has not shown any pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In fact, in an interview, Dr. Collins’ response to a congressional letter outlining pro-life members’ concerns dripped with condescension, implying that the group of 41 congressmen understood neither the science nor the ethics of embryo and stem cell experiments. Dr. Collins owes us an apology. We know the science, use the scientifically accurate terms and know the ethical facts. Dr. Collins’ positions at NIH have not been pro-life.

U.S. President Donald Trump, center, gets up to leave after making a quick statement at a meeting during the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Donald Trump, the right guy to rein in the United Nations

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump took the United Nations to task in recent remarks at the global body’s New York headquarters, telling those attending a special forum on “management, security and development” that the entity was in dire need of reform. It’s about time America snipped the U.N.’s wings.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Sept. 19, 2017

What the hurricanes teach

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma were as powerful as the big South Florida hurricanes of 1926, 1928, and 1935, but the death toll was very small compared to the earlier hurricanes in the area, even though the population is now more than 10 times the size. The Great Galveston hurricane of 1900 is estimated to have cost 6,000 to 12,000 lives. The hurricanes that have hit the U.S. in the last 50 years have resulted in relatively few lives lost, with the exception of Hurricane Katrina where an estimated 1,833 died.

Duplicitous Durbin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Democrats try to impose a ‘religious test’

- The Washington Times

The attempted Senate mugging of Notre Dame law professor Amy Coney Barrett by Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Dick Durbin was ugly and may have amounted to an attempt to impose an unconstitutional “religious test” on a judicial nominee seeking Senate confirmation, but said more about the muggers than their intended victim.

One of 35 immigrants from 23 countries awaits the start of the naturalization ceremony that will transform them into American citizens at Northeast Jackson International Baccalaureate World Middle School in Jackson, Miss., Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. The immigrants underwent an extensive security check as well as study and testing on U.S. history, civics and government, as part of the requirements to earning citizenship documentation. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

The ignorant nation and its legacy

At a National Archives ceremony last Friday in Washington, D.C., 30 immigrants became naturalized U.S. citizens. In a video, President Trump encouraged them to embrace the “full rights, and the sacred duties, that come with American citizenship.”

Illustration on the North Korean threat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

There’s no easy living with a nuclear-armed North Korea

We cannot learn to live with a nuclear-armed North Korea because it is a pistol aimed at our heads by the North’s dictator Kim Jong-un, China’s dictator Xi Jinping and Russia’s dictator Vladimir Putin, that sooner or later will go off.

In Praise of Asylum Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A thank you to America

On Sept. 6 at 9:57 a.m., the U.S. government accepted my application for political asylum in the United States. I want to thank the U.S. government and the great American people for taking us into their embrace and their wings at a moment when I, along with my family, am faced with the greatest adversity of my life.

The Capitol is seen at sunrise as Congress returns from the August recess to face work on immigration, the debt limit, funding the government, and help for victims of Hurricane Harvey, in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Washington’s unethical ethics watchdog

Before “fake news” there was CREW — the ridiculously self-proclaimed Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. This supposed government ethics watchdog has always been more of a partisan lapdog to left-leaning politicians. But now — according to a leaked document authored by Democratic hit man David Brock — CREW is set to dramatically expand its size and scope to be a key player in pursuit of impeaching President Trump and disrupting Republican priorities.

Related Articles

Learn from the past

Ed Rendell and Judd Gregg give an excellent bipartisan list of solutions to the national economic-security threat we face from Congress failing to raise the debt ceiling ("Playing politics with the nation's financial future," Web, Sept. 5). But they miss at least one solution that could solve many other problems: early investments in prevention.

The unlikely romance on Capitol Hill

The Republican Congress of 2017 bears a remarkable resemblance to the New York Mets of 1962, their first year in baseball. The Mets couldn't hit the ball and they couldn't catch the ball and succeeded only in showing up for supper. Their manager, Casey Stengel, "the old perfessor," finally cried out in desperation: "Can't anybody here play this game?"

President Donald Trump pauses during a news conference with the Emir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday Sept. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Thrown off the gravy train

The Environmental Protection Agency's gravy train just ain't what she used to be. Green groups are awestruck, agog and maybe even aghast at the news that the Trump administration has put a political operative to work vetting applications for EPA grants worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

In this Oct. 9, 2016, file photo, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, right, speaks as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump listens during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. (Rick T. Wilking/Pool via AP) ** FILE **

Trump still beats Hillary, any poll day of the week

- The Washington Times

A new survey from NBC/Wall Street Journal finds that -- and this is the yada, yada, yawn part -- President Donald Trump's popularity with the American people has hit a new low. But here's the part that actually means something: The same survey found voters still like Trump more than Hillary Clinton.

Illustration on Obama's destructive impact on the U.S. Navy by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The crux of the Navy's collisions

The U.S. Navy's loss of two sophisticated, key anti-ballistic-missile-capable destroyers within a matter of several weeks is symptomatic of a much larger issue.

Illustration on the continuing rarification and isolation of the American academic world by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The strange thing that happened to America

America got lost on the way to the 21st century. Many Americans lost pride in being American, and no longer cherish the rigors of the First Amendment, which gives pride of place to freedom of speech. This didn't happen in one generation, though the baby boomers, born after the soldiers came marching home in triumph in 1945, grew up nursing grievance. This led to crucial changes in attitude, and succeeding generations felt empowered by rebellion.

Outsider Politician is the Message Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Outsider politics as the message

Information theory better explains America's confounding current politics than does conventional analysis. Such an approach more than simply aids in grasping increasingly nontraditional politics. It allows the separation of today's important content from its discordant form.

Iran's Road to Syria Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The gathering Iranian menace in Syria

Things are quickly changing on the ground in Syria. The civil war is concluding, with Bashar Assad still in power. As the U.S.-backed coalition drives the Islamic State from its remaining strongholds, Iranian-backed forces are racing to fill the void, seizing strategic territory with the goal of making Syria the heart and possibly the Iranian logistical center of a "Shia Crescent" -- replete with land, air and naval bases -- creating an Iranian sphere of influence stretching from Tehran through Baghdad and Damascus to Beirut and the Mediterranean.

Illustration on the challenges of immigration policy by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Immigrant children and the rule of law

Earlier this week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that in six months, the Department of Justice will begin the long process for deportation proceedings against 800,000 young people who came to America as babies and young children in the care of their parents and others because those entries into this country were and remain unlawful.

A battle in the heart of Dixie

Roy Moore and Luther Strange are headed to a runoff in the Alabama Republican primary to fill the Senate seat once held by Jeff Sessions. I worked for Mr. Moore and Mr. Strange, who inhabit different political communities.

A fighter pilot myth unraveled

The Flying Tigers. Say it out loud and the next words of out your mouth will probably be "John Wayne." One of the staples of late-night television movies remains the 1942 epic that starred Mr. Wayne playing a character modeled on that equally rugged American fighter, Gen. Claire Chennault. That film and the shelf of books published since then have insured that the legend of the Tigers -- formally known as the American Volunteer Group (AVG) is firmly fixed in our memories.