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The Democratic assault on free speech

- The Washington Times

Everybody’s for free speech — until somebody says something he doesn’t like. But the genius of the First Amendment is that it is so direct and plain that even a lawyer or a judge can understand it.

Illustration on the Obama administrations role in Iranian nuclear ambitions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s price for Obama’s coveted legacy

The importance of any political event is best measured against its opponents’ reactions. By that yardstick, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s agreement to speak about the dangers of Iran’s pursuit of nuclear weapons before a joint session of Congress is already enormously significant.

Illustration on American's diminished economic freedom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Regaining lost economic freedom

If you were to rank all the countries of the world based on their level of economic freedom, you’d think the United States would be a shoo-in for first place, right? Surely we would be at least somewhere in the top five.

Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yemen’s collapse demonstrates Obama’s foreign policy failures

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

Illustration on corrupt reprisals from the IRS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Payback from the IRS

The Internal Revenue Service’s woes did not begin or end with Lois Lerner and the agency’s targeting of political opponents with punitive action. Earlier this month we became painfully aware (again) that political games and punishing the taxpayer appear to be the burgeoning raison d’etre of the tax-collecting agency.

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week’s State of the Union address is that the economic “crisis is over.” Apparently, we’ve been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama’s celebration was the old “Icky Shuffle” end zone dance.

A woman waves a Greek flag during a speech by the leader of Syriza left-wing party Alexis Tsipras outside Athens University Headquarters, Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015. A triumphant Alexis Tsipras told Greeks that his radical left Syriza party's win in Sunday's early general election meant an end to austerity and humiliation and that the country's regular and often fraught debt inspections were a thing of the past. "Today the Greek people have made history. Hope has made history," Tsipras said in his victory speech at a conference hall in central Athens. (AP Photo/Fotis Plegas G.)

Now Greeks should dump the Euro

Since 2008, the Greek economy has shrunk by 25 percent, and the stock market is down more than 80 percent.

Illustration on school choice by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The steady progress of school choice

Sunday marked the start of National School Choice Week, an annual celebration of education reforms that give parents the power to pick the schools, public or private, that are best for their children.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering “free” health care, “free” phones and “free” food to the masses, he’s upped the bribery to “free” community college tuition and “free” child care. It’s not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

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Wrangell-St. Elias National Park in Alaska, view from Dead Dog Hill. Credit: National Park Service

Paying for the national parks

America's national parks are national treasures, unique in their natural beauty, geological features and recreational opportunities. The parks rescued millions of acres from waste and often thoughtless abuse. Since President Ulysses Grant set aside a federal preservation in 1872, the national park system has evolved to become the envy of other nations.

Thousands of people wave national flags and hold placards that read "I am Charlie" at the Place de la Nation in Paris Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. More than 40 world leaders, their arms linked, marched through Paris Sunday to rally for unity and freedom of expression and to honor 17 victims of three days of terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

An ‘ambassadonor’ shows Obama’s solidarity with France

In yet another example of disrespect to our allies, neither President Obama nor any member of his administration attended Sunday's unity march in Paris. Instead, representing the United States was Obama campaign bundler, Jane Hartley, the newly appointed U. S. ambassador to France.

illustration on the international Islamo-terroist threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Freedom hangs in the balance

Give me liberty or give me death. The pen is mightier than the sword. These are fantastic statements that people and politicians love to make while giving speeches. These words are now dripping with the real blood of innocent cartoonists and jihadi terrorists. Twelve satirists from the French magazine Charlie Hebdo are dead for refusing to bow before the tyranny of fear perpetuated by radical Islamists from across the globe. Summary judgment was carried out by local zealots, the Kouachi brothers, who themselves are now dead at the hands of French police.

Gasoline Capitol Dome Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Washington’s gas tax guzzlers

Suddenly everyone in Washington wants a gas tax hike — apparently so that consumers don't save too much money at the pump. As prices keep falling, the politicians and the moochers in Washington want a piece of the action.

California Raisins Busted by the USDA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s raisin robbery

The Obama administration is once again championing Uncle Sam's sacred right to seize farmers' harvests. After being trounced on procedural grounds at the Supreme Court in 2013, the Justice Department wants the Supremes to uphold a recent appeals court decision that raisin confiscations are no violation of property rights. However, the Obama administration is misleading the court on whether raisin producers still support the oppressive regime.

Illustration on the dangers of proposed net neutrality action by the government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Blunting a radical agenda at the FCC

When bureaucrats in the government think Congress isn't doing enough to push along an agenda, federal agencies still have the responsibility to regulate fairly and judiciously. But that's sometimes no fun. On President Obama's watch, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, for two examples, continue to merrily scoot around Congress to impose their own agendas.

Illegals in U.S. enrich Mexico

I hope no one is surprised that Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto so graciously offered to doctor the paperwork for millions of Mexican illegals to have the legal standing to enter the United States — without the approval of the U.S. government ("Mexican president offers Obama help with amnesty documents," Web, Jan. 6).

Atlanta Fire Chief Kelvin Cochran has been fired for authoring a Christian book in 2013 that described homosexuality as a "sexual perversion." (atlantaga.gov)

Stifling diversity in Atlanta

Liberals claim to be champions of "diversity" in all things, particularly in matters of race, ethnicity and gender (they mean "sex") and gender-bending. "Our diversity is our greatest strength," Bill Clinton, who demonstrated his embrace of diversity with the pursuit of a diversity of women in the White House, told a diversity forum last year in Phoenix.

AP editorializing, not reporting

In "Mayor eulogizes officer as cops outside turn backs" (Web, Jan. 4) The Associated Press shows us how not to report a story. In the very first paragraph, the story refers to the officers who turned their backs on the mayor as "repeating a stinging display of scorn for the mayor." Paragraph two starts off with "[t]he show of disrespect" and adds later that "[t]he gesture among officers added to tensions between the mayor and rank-and-file police even though he sought to quiet them."

Liberty Censored by the FEC Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The FEC's Internet gag rule

In the time leading up to the Battles of Lexington and Concord, American patriots had, for almost a decade, gathered near the Boston Common in the shade of a majestic elm tree to share their grievances about the king's government.

Illustration on the need to awaken to the global Islamist threat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A warning from the Paris attacks

The Islamic terror attack on the magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris was carried out by Muslim criminals who were apparently trained in Yemen.

Illustration on aspirants to the presidency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The presidential look in the mirror

The race for the presidency never ends. More than a few politicians lusting after a desk in the Oval Office begin planning years and even decades in advance for the day when they'll get their shot.

Christie Cowboys furor not news

People need to get over the fact that New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is a Cowboys fan ("Christie attends Cowboys game as guest, hugs owner," web, Jan. 5). So are people from all over the United States.

Korea Cyber Attack on Hollywood Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Preventing a 'cyber Pearl Harbor'

It took an attack by a nation-state on Hollywood to bring the threat of cyberattacks to the forefront of the Americans' consciousness, but we have been fighting this war for decades.

ATSC standard protects consumers

In "TV digital streaming technology speeds past FCC License rule" (Web, Jan. 1) it is not clear whether op-ed writer Andrew Langer's intention is to argue for a change in law or to malign MPEG LA with incorrect and misleading information. Although the former — whether over-the-air broadcast TV services should be freely accessible through every TV set sold in the United States — may be a subject of fair debate, the latter is deceitful and irresponsible.