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The Hillary Effect on Women Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s problem with women

Two weeks before the election, Hillary Clinton appears on track to win the presidency and become the first female commander in chief. She can credit her surge in the polls this last month to women — primarily her opponent’s offensive comments unearthed from a decade ago and the various accusations that have suddenly surfaced and have dominated the media.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greets supporters following a "Get out the vote," rally at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016 in downtown Tampa, Fla. (Loren Elliot/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Hillary’s anti-transparency bargain

President Obama recently condemned the Republican Party, claiming that its “central principle” is to suppress voting. But, while his administration piously pledges to protect voting rights, it has almost guaranteed that Americans will be blindfolded on Election Day. While the Justice Department will deploy election monitors at polls in 25 states, no one watched Uncle Sam.

Illustration on NATO fiscal responsibility by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A threadbare alliance

Historians and political scientists commonly describe the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as the most effective military alliance in contemporary history. It was the bond between the United States and Western Europe that helped contribute to the decline and eventual collapse of the Soviet Union.

Illustration on the 2016 campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Donald Trump is still the safer choice

America is a two-party system and after party conventions select the nominees, we have two choices and only two choices. Both nominees have demonstrated serious character flaws. The current spotlight is on lewd, vulgar comments from Donald Trump that cannot be defended. Nevertheless, his words could never be used to justify a vote for Hillary Clinton and her leftist agenda.

Donald Trump arrives at a Trump rally at Sanford Orlando International Airport in Sanford, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. Trump is pledging to bolster the government's investment in the space program, a boon to the Space Coast of Florida. (Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

The staying power of populism

Despite evidence from the 2016 presidential campaign, doubts dominate about populism’s ability to win America’s ultimate prize. “It can’t happen here” is as wrong as the political establishment’s misreading of the populist movement itself. Populism’s history here and abroad argues a populist triumph could eventually occur — if not this November, then soon.

Missile Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran’s proxy missile attacks

The recent missile attacks attributed to Yemeni Houthi rebels, with assistance from the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and Hezbollah, demonstrate Iran’s classic use of proxies to promote its political agenda. The Houthi rebels denied any involvement in the missile attacks.

Illustration on non-voters by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In defense of the nonvoter

Between now and Nov. 8, Americans will be inundated with good-intentioned public service announcements urging them to take the time to vote. And to buttress that argument, statistics about the usual low turnout rate — about 60 percent or so — will suggest that this American trend is somehow illustrative of a major defect in the body politic.

John Podsesta (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The coming media settlement with Hillary

- The Washington Times

There’s no one more repentant and eager to promise reform than the town drunk coming off a week at the bottom of a bottle. Some of “the top political reporters in the country,” as they think of themselves, will be soon looking for similar redemption.

The Tail Wagging the Middle East Dog Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Mistaking the cause of Middle East turmoil

President Obama might sandbag Israel in pursuit of something Palestinian leadership rejects — peace with the Jewish state. The blow reportedly may fall in the interregnum between the Nov. 8 election and the Jan. 20 inauguration of the next president.

Illustration on human trafficking and open borders by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The other open-borders commodity

Some proponents of the current open borders policy also claim to be defenders of women’s rights. It is, therefore, supremely ironic that one unintended consequence of open borders is a substantial spike in sex trafficking of young girls. That’s the major takeaway of a trip to South Texas earlier this month.

Illustration on Hillary's support of partial birth abortion by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reconsider ‘Never Trump’

While Democrats perpetually circle the wagons, Republicans engage a perpetual circular firing squad. The same holds true for many evangelicals. Democrats and secularists count on it.

Britney Corbett oversees a ninth-grade math at Washington Leadership Academy in Northeast D.C. The technology-focused high school charter, which opened its doors in August, teaches students the basics and how to write computer code and use drones. (Julia Porterfield/The Washington Times)

Black students matter

Money talks and the NAACP walks away from its mission to ensure educational equality for black kids.

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BOOK REVIEW: 'Company Confessions: Secrets, Memoirs and the CIA'

Say the words "Publications Review Board" within earshot of a retired CIA officer, and his reaction is likely to the same as if you goosed him with an electric cow prod: a harsh frown, and perhaps an explosive epithet. The PRB is the in-house office that has go/no-go authority over permission to publish anything the officer writes for public distribution, be it a letter to the editor or a memoir.

This Jan. 14, 2015 file photo shows Yahoo's headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif.  (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Boo-boo by Yahoo

Freedom, among other good things, is the right to be left in peace. But with privacy under assault, it's a right frequently and eagerly trampled. With many of their personal transactions conducted online, Americans are learning that their private business is being vacuumed up without their knowledge.

Both candidates have truth aversion

We know that many politicians make promises they cannot keep and they typically use manipulative and ambiguous language to hide their true ideas and feelings. They hope the public will forget their false statements.

Antonio Guterres   Associated Press photo

Ready for the U.N.'s top post?

On New Year's Day, Ban Ki-moon will step down as secretary-general of the United Nations. The U.N. Security Council has voted to recommend former Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Guterres to succeed him. When the U.N. General Assembly approves that recommendation this week, it will be a done deal.

Illustration on Deutsche Bank and economic troubles in Europe by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The next financial crisis

To listen to Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, the U.S. economy has recovered miraculously from the financial crisis, and another jolt of left-wing economics will hoist Americans into a new golden age.

Illustration on complications attendant to living up to the hopes of the Nobel Peace Prize by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Nobel Peace curse

Last week Colombia's President Juan Manuel Santos was granted the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to end the country's decades-long conflict, just days after the people of Colombia rejected his agreement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) rebels.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for photos after speaking at a rally at Miami Dade College in Miami, Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

Hillary in her own words

Nobody much trusts Hillary Clinton. The public-opinion polls have shown that for months. Even her supporters concede that she's self-centered and given to patronize nearly everybody — Donald Trump-like, you might say. Millions of Americans just don't like her. Pity the country with a leader whom nobody likes or trusts.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at Miami Dade College in Miami, Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

Hillary's tax reform deficit

In the second presidential debate, Hillary Clinton once again failed to mention one of the biggest problems facing America -- the fact that our businesses cannot compete with the rest of the world. Because the U.S. tax code has not been updated for three decades, American businesses today face the highest rates in the world and are subject to a complex system of double taxation.

Saudi Accountability for September Eleven Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Ti

Bringing accountability for Sept. 11

On Sept. 28, the Senate and House of Representatives overwhelmingly voted to override President Obama's veto of the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA), upholding the right of families of the victims of the Sept. 11 attacks to have their day in court.

If Mencken were alive and glaring

Oh, how H.L. Mencken would have loved this. The renowned Baltimore journalist who said that national political conventions and politicians were for "connoisseurs of the obscene" would have never guessed how obscene it could be. Not that he would have endorsed obscenity -- he was Victorian by upbringing -- but the spectacle of politicians sweating and strutting their stuff offered him endless sport.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Hillary and the art of the dirty mouth

Cussin' and talkin' dirty is ugly stuff, ugliest of all in the mouths of women, who, despite everything the feminists can do to insist on equality (with a few caveats), are usually a little more refined than men. Most of them. Most of the time.

Illustration on the candidates's relative attitude to the U.S. Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

At stake: The Constitution

This election is about a lot of things, but it is fundamentally about the U.S. Constitution and whether federal judges will adhere to their oath to "faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me under the Constitution and laws of the United States," or dilute, attack and destroy our founding document.

Fixing the Justice System Illustration by on Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making our justice system more equitable, humane and efficient

The problems at the heart of our criminal justice system now permeate every corner of our communities -- from the mother who is left behind to support her family alone to the returning citizen who has paid his debt to society but still can't find work.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Making the Unipolar Moment'

The classic symptom of bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression, is chronic mood swings. A bipolar personality bounces helplessly back and forth between what economist Alan Greenspan once called "irrational exuberance" and mindless, hopeless despair.