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Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol is surrounded by media after meeting with protesters Monday, Aug. 18, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer has touched off rancorous protests in Ferguson, a St. Louis suburb where police have used riot gear and tear gas. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Media mantra misses the story as Ferguson explodes

Much of the media mantra in Ferguson, Missouri, followed a simple storyline. An 18-year-old black, known to his friends and family as a “gentle giant,” planned to attend college the following week. As he walked down the street with his friend around noon Saturday, Aug. 9, he met a police officer who gunned him down as he tried to surrender with his hands held high.

President Barack Obama, left, points to Sen. Chris Dodd, D-Conn., center, and Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., right, after signing the Dodd Frank-Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in a ceremony in the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, Wednesday, July 21, 2010.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

EDITORIAL: Economic strangulation with red tape

President Obama knows nothing about making the economy grow. On his watch, America’s gross domestic product has inched forward at an annual average of 1.2 percent, according to World Bank data. We’re outclassed not only by Brazil, China and India, but by Mali, Guatemala, Swaziland and Vanuatu.

Gun-grabber Bloomberg’s epic fail in Milwaukee

Billionaire Michael R. Bloomberg could learn a thing or two from the biblical story about an Israelite soldier named David, who went up against Goliath, a giant of a man and a powerful foe.

James E. Ferguson, Texas Governor 1915-1917

The other indicted governor of Texas

Whatever the final outcome of the seemingly politically based indictment of Texas Gov. Rick Perry, it should be noted that the media’s references to his being the first Texas chief executive to be charged in nearly a century fails to provide the necessary historical background for the comparison.

Ted Williams Baseball Card

Random observations for summer 2014

One of the big differences between Democrats and Republicans is that we at least know what the Democrats stand for, whether we agree with it or not. For Republicans, though, we have to guess.

A dead youth and a wounded community

The languorous dog days of August were shattered by the recent tragic shooting death of an unarmed black teenager in a St. Louis suburb.

In this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, United Airlines Flight 175 collides into the south tower of the World Trade Center in New York as smoke billows from the north tower. (AP Photo/Chao Soi Cheong)

An ominous post-9/11 warning

Two recent interviews have been the topic of lively debate within the so-called “foreign-policy community.”

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, right, assigned protest oversight to Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol, left, after violent protests erupted following the fatal shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer on Aug. 9. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

The wrong way to restore peace in Ferguson

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, called out the National Guard on Monday to restore order to the streets of Ferguson. Heavily armed soldiers will take the place of even more heavily armed police officers who had been assigned to prevent looting as the mobs gathered to riot.

Travis County Special prosecutor Michael McCrum announced that Texas Gov. Rick Perry has been indicted by a grand jury in Austin, Texas on Friday, Aug. 15, 2014.  Gov. Rick Perry, 63, was charged with abuse of official capacity, a first-degree felony, and coercion of a public official related to his effort last year to force District Attorney Rosemary Lehmberg to resign after her drunken driving arrest. (AP Photo/Austin American-Statesman, Rodolfo Gonzalez)

The ‘case’ against Rick Perry

Prosecutors in Texas could have done the nation a service with the indictment of Gov. Rick Perry of Texas. The indictment of him is so transparent as vindictive prosecution that it will surely topple by its own weight, and beyond that, it could focus needed light on the urgent need for prosecutorial reform.

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Alfred Kinsey, seated left, with his main co-authors of "Sexual Behavior in the Human Female" at the Kinsey Institute's headquarters at Indiana University in 1953. (AP Photo)

The not-so-gay census

Judged by the noise the homosexual lobby makes, with its parades and strutting in the popular media, you might think nearly everybody in America wears the lavender with the pride of the Irish in the wearing of the green.

FILE - In this May 22, 2013 file photo, Internal Revenue Service official Lois Lerner refuses to answer questions as the House Oversight Committee holds a hearing to investigate the extra scrutiny the IRS gave Tea Party and other conservative groups that applied for tax-exempt status, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lerner, a former IRS official at the heart of the agency's tea party controversial called Republicans "crazies" and more in newly released emails. Lerner used to head the IRS division that handles applications for tax-exempt status. In a series of emails with a colleague in November 2012, Lerner made two disparaging remarks about members of the GOP, including one remark that was profane. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., released the emails Wednesday as part of his committee's investigation. Camp says the emails show Lerner's disgust with conservatives. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

KARIS: The real agents of the IRS: the best show on television!

The best new reality show on television this season is The Real Agents of the IRS on the Department of Treasury Network, which is owned by Obama, Inc. Unlike all those other Housewives shows, with the fake cooking, lips and sisterhood, these are real people who earn real paychecks from real hardworking American taxpaying citizens. This show has mystery, intrigue and talk of recycling which makes the Green Movement giddy.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Fourth Revolution'

"The Fourth Revolution" is about government and ideas. John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, senior editors at The Economist, posit that ''the western state has been through three-and-a-half great revolutions in modern times."

Members Congress clinb the steps of the House of Representatives for final votes, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, July 31, 2014. Congress ran full-tilt into election-year gridlock over immigration Thursday and staggered toward a five-week summer break with no agreement in sight on legislation to cope with the influx of young immigrants flocking illegally to the United States.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Free markets, limited government a 'natural disinfectant' to corruption

- The Washington Times

Some conservatives are done with cautious reactions and ready to rumble. Their culture has changed, and there's disinfectant involved. "Our times do not call for timid, poll-tested solutions. They call for a bold agenda that delivers opportunity for all but favoritism to none," declares a new conservative policy agenda, a project of Heritage Action for America, the feisty grassroots offshoot of the Heritage Foundation.

NATO irrelevance Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Will NATO end with a whimper?

April marked the 65th birthday of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, formed at the height of the Cold War to stop the huge postwar Red Army from overrunning Western Europe.

Illustration on Government spying on Government by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The smoking gun of Obama's lawlessness

In some respects, the recent admission by CIA Director John O. Brennan that his agents and his lawyers have been spying on the senators whose job it is to monitor the agency should come as no surprise.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Hamas' self-made predicament

To those who are offended by pictures of casualties in Gaza, I would remind you that the terrorist organization Hamas has set up armed camps, stored rockets and weapons amid civilians, and uses the media to provoke outcries from free-world nations in favor of its self-made, dire predicament.

Illustration on giving by Donna Grethen/ Tribune Content Agency

Scaife funeral proves philanthropy trumps politics

One would never guess who attended Dick Scaife's memorial service in the Pennsylvania countryside last week. Scaife has been referred to as the "father of modern conservatism."

BOOK REVIEW: 'A Very Principled Boy'

Behind a carefully tended patrician facade, OSS officer Duncan Lee hid secrets that could have put him either in prison or on the gallows. While working as a trusted aide to OSS director William Donovan, he spied for the Soviet Union.

A Nigerian health official wearing a protective suit waits to screen passengers at the arrivals hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014. Nigerian authorities on Monday confirmed a second case of Ebola in Africa's most populous country, an alarming setback as officials across the region battle to stop the spread of a disease that has killed more than 700 people. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

Poll finds Americans worried about Ebola and queasy about the media coverage

- The Washington Times

Media coverage is intense and often alarming on the Ebola outbreak in Africa, and the recent arrival of two patients in the U.S. to receive treatment. Is the nation worried? A new survey finds that 58 percent of Americans are concerned personally about the threat of Ebola disease, and a substantial number are aware of shrill press coverage.

This Sunday, July 27, 2014 photo provided by Ben Ferren shows large hail that fell in Midland, Mich., where winds toppled trees and ripped the roofs off buildings during severe thundertorms on Sunday. Crews are working to restore power after severe thunderstorms hit Michigan's Lower Peninsula and knocked out power to about 223,000 homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Ben Ferren)

Paging Al Gore: NASA says that global warming could be 'on hiatus'

- The Washington Times

NASA truly has the 100,000 feet viewpoint on this one. The nation’s space agency his noticed an inconvenient cooling on the planet lately. Atmospheric scientist Norman Loeb now asks: “The recent pause in global warming: A temporary blip or something more permanent?”. Mr. Loeb's reasoning “explores how global warming may be on vacation,” NASA helpfully explains.

President Barack Obama speaks at the US Africa Business Forum during the US Africa Leaders Summit, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in Washington. African heads of state are gathering in Washington for an unprecedented summit to promote business development. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

DRIESSEN: Holding Big Green accountable

Few Americans can imagine life without reliable, affordable electricity – for lights, refrigerators, air conditioning, computers, and countless other technologies that enhance and safeguard our lives. But in Africa, India and other regions some 2.5 billion people still lack electricity or must rely on little solar panels on their huts, a wind turbine in their village or unreliable power grids.

Illustration on African electricity needs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An Obama switch for African electricity

One of the greatest challenges facing developing nations, including those in Africa, is a lack of affordable, reliable electricity.

Illustration on Hamas influence on reporting media by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hamas’ rules for reporters control news

If you've been following the conflict in Gaza, you've seen dramatic pictures of heavily armed Israeli soldiers, their tanks and helicopters. What you almost certainly have not seen are the combatants Israelis have been fighting.