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Illustration on the Brexit vote. (Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times)

What the British revolt signals

Oh what a difference a break makes. On Thursday, our English cousins across the pond voted to leave the European Union. For some reason, they had enough of unelected bureaucrats issuing rules and regulations ruining their lives and throwing the future in the dustbin.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's economic plans by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary pleads for four more years

“People are working harder and longer just to keep their heads above water. And to deal with the costs, the everyday costs, the costs of basics like childcare and prescription drugs that are too high. College is getting more expensive every day. And wages are still too low and inequality is too great. Good jobs in this country are still too hard to come by.”

Illustration on Chinese drugs coming through Mexico by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Drugs and thugs

On June 9, The New York Times ran this headline on Page A1: “Drug That Killed Prince Is Making Mexican Cartels Richer, U.S. Says.” The first line of the story reads, “The drug that killed Prince has become a favorite of Mexican cartels because it is extremely potent, popular in the United States — and immensely profitable, American officials say.”

Eco-Terrorism Damage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Greenpeace under fire

Governments and courts around the world are finally cracking down on the eco-terrorist organization Greenpeace. The crackdown, which is long overdue, couldn’t happen to a more misguided bunch of people.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The bad moon rising over Hillary

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton won’t be able to say she didn’t see the bad moon rising. Donald Trump gave her a blistering introduction this week to Presidential Politics 102, which differs in a remarkable way from Politics 101, which she encountered in her first attempt in 2008 and before that as the managing partner in Bubba’s two campaigns.

Illustration on the Obama administration's plans for the fossil fuel industry by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Why Exxon is not the problem

For more than 200 years, the American birthright has provided protection against the threat that one’s head might hang on London Bridge — or the Key Bridge, if you prefer — for disagreeing with the government.

Illustration on the struggle for Kurdish independence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Kurdish independence matters

If the next U.S. president wants “to put America first” he might look toward the Kurdish north of Iraq. There the long-standing question of Kurdish independence scares Washington into a tired reflex that quashes important U.S. interests beneath an unwavering policy to promote the fiction of a unified Iraq.

Illustration on the Republican alternative to Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ryan’s Obamacare liberation

Paul Ryan’s House Republican Task Force on health policy reform released on Wednesday the Republican majority’s unified plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Republicans should not be shy about making this reform the centerpiece of this year’s election.

Illustration on the dangers of Obama, the ideologue by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ideologues make for dangerous politicians

Hillary Clinton is a seasoned liberal politician, but one with few core beliefs. Her positions on subjects such as gay marriage, free-trade agreements, the Keystone XL pipeline, the Iraq War, the Assad regime in Syria and the use of the term “radical Islam” all seem to hinge on what she perceives 51 percent of the public to believe on any given day.

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2013, file photo, a student walks across the Lawn in front of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va., while the Rotunda was undergoing renovation. Amid scrutiny from Congress and campus activists, colleges across the country are under growing pressure to reveal the financial investments made using their endowments. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Why we need charter public colleges

In 2014 state community colleges and four-year colleges taught more than 13 million students, or about 76 percent of all college students in the nation. But these public institutions are in serious trouble.

Strong Families Make a Strong America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The father factor

Father’s Day has come and gone. The grills are turned off and the gift ties have been put away. The leisurely family time is over and we are all back to the daily grind. But there is much work to do to strengthen America’s families.

Illustration on ineffectual Obama administration strategies against ISIS by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama’s disintegrating strategy

Throughout his presidency, Barack Obama has maintained his willful ignorance of the fact that weakness against terrorists abroad, coupled with weakness against them at home, add up to more than the sum of their parts. To defeat terrorists, we need to have policies at home and strategies abroad that are integrated and support each other.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks about the economy at Fort Hayes Vocational School Tuesday, June 21, 2016, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Factors that elected Bill could now defeat Hillary

Hillary Clinton knows better than anyone the economy’s weakness and its political danger. The reason George H.W. Bush lost a close race to a political outsider with glaring liabilities 24 years ago was public perception that the economy was weak.

Related Articles

BOOK REVIEW: 'A Hero of France'

Often, while reading a book, we look to see how many pages are left. We do this for two reasons. The first is because we don't like the book and wonder if we can stay the course. The second reason is because the book is so good we don't want it to end, and we're hoping the book has somehow, miraculously, increased in length. "A Hero of France" is one of those good books we don't want to end.

Illustration on how, in a law abiding society, all lives matter by Linas garsys/The Washington Times

When #BlackLivesMatter activists lie, people die

People die -- make that, black people die -- and no one seems to care. Homicide statistics continue to climb, and none of the digital ink spilled between the #BlackLivesMatter and the #AllLivesMatter Twitter crowds have made an ounce of difference.

The Supreme Court in Washington is seen Tuesday, May 31, 2016 (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The impossible green dream

It's great to have a cause, and almost any will do so long as it's neither caustic nor quixotic. Environmental extremists have a cause that has been, at one time or another, both. Enlisting the power of the federal government to impose a "green" agenda and rob property owners of the use of their land has threatened the well-being of law-abiding Americans.

Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell of Ky. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

A panicked rush to the life boats

Hysteria is rarely pretty and never reassuring, and the hysterics never achieve what they think losing their heads will accomplish. No one wants a surgeon to throw up his hands in disgust if he drops his scalpel, or an airline pilot who runs screaming from the cockpit when the plane encounters severe turbulence.

Still sanctuary for war criminals

In "The long reach of justice" (Web, June 6) Andrew Nagorski contends that the recent war-crimes conviction of former Chad President Hissene Habre demonstrates that "now there is no sanctuary" for war criminals, "no matter how far they run [o]r how long they elude justice."

Obama's willful ignorance

I read with great interest James Zumwalt's recent op-ed, "Obama's Nordic nonsense" (Web, June 7). The piece relates President Obama's recent comment that if Nordic countries controlled the world, "they could clean things up."

Miss Liberty Gets the Boot Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Another assault on the right to privacy

While Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders battle over the consequences of their final round in the Democratic primaries and Donald Trump argues that Mrs. Clinton should be in prison for failing to safeguard state secrets while she was secretary of state, the same FBI that is diligently investigating her is quietly and perniciously seeking to cut more holes in the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution.

Donald Trump    Illustration by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Explaining Donald Trump

If there is one explanation for Donald Trump's success it is this: Unlike most Republicans, he fights back. He may not have the late Muhammad Ali's finesse, but he sees himself as more than capable of dealing a "knockout" punch to Hillary Clinton in November. That ought to be the goal of any Republican presidential nominee.

Illustration on China's relationship with a nuclear North Korea by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China-North Korea rapprochement?

Chinese President Xi Jinping's recent meeting with Ri Su-yong, North Korea's vice chairman of the Communist Party's Central Committee, could be the beginning of a new type of bilateral relationship between China and North Korea.

Illustration on CFPB interference with short term lending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Payday lending rules that work

It is an unfortunate reality that many people live paycheck to paycheck in this country. For these individuals, any unexpected bill, whether it is a car repair or a medical emergency, can wreak havoc. Short-term, small-dollar loans are essential resources for those who need just a little help overcoming these types of unexpected expenses.

Illustration on the Hillary/Trump main event by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The coming thrilla to chilla the cheap seats

Two of the most famous people in the world are running for president of the United States from different directions. Like Muhammad Ali at the height of his fame as the champ, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump could knock on any door almost anywhere in the world and be recognized. Either might even be invited in for a cup of coffee.

(Associated Press/File)

When veterans need not apply

If you wonder what has become of us since the Greatest Generation began leaving the stage, consider this elegant 19th century warning from Victorian statesman and author, Sir William Francis Butler:

Illustration on the cyberwar threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How to define cyberwar

One of the things that keeps our intelligence and military leaders from sleeping soundly is the problem of cyberwar and its subsets, cyber-espionage, cybersabotage and what most people call "hacking," which isn't something that only teenagers do from their parents' basements.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Love that Boy: What Two Presidents, Eight Road Trips and My Son Taught Me'

Today parents are bombarded with expert advice and theories on the right way to parent and what parents should expect from their children. There are countless news stories about overly permissive parents, "free-range parents" who let their children explore their surroundings with modest supervision, and so-called "helicopter parents" who do not allow their children to do the most basic things.