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Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men’s lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus — “J’ accuse!” — only because he was a Jew.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that’s wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they’re concerned, he is “the swamp.”

Illustration on the threat of hurricanes to the electrical grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lights that a hurricane can’t blow out

With millions of Americans experiencing power outages due to catastrophic hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, there has never been a more important time to look critically at the reliability and durability of our electrical grid. In Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by Hurricane Maria, reports indicate that it will take months — or even as long as a year — for the power to be fully restored.

Illustration of Fethullah Gulen by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fethullah Gulen, a pious Muslim or a radical Islamist?

Controversial Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is back in the news following a diplomatic standoff between Turkey and the United States. On Oct. 8, the U.S. mission in Turkey announced a decision “to suspend all non-immigrant visa services at all U.S. diplomatic facilities in Turkey,” in retaliation for the arrest of a Drug Enforcement Administration liaison in Turkey with suspected ties to Mr. Gulen. Turkey has answered in kind by freezing the issuance of new visas.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The problem with Obamacare subsidies

Late last week, President Trump signed an executive order directing the secretaries of the Treasury and health and human services to cease making payments to health care insurance companies in behalf of the more than 6 million Americans who qualify for these payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

Claire McCaskill’s crusade could hurt Native American rights

Let’s establish an important legal concept and set the context. The legal term “sovereign immunity,” according to the Wex Legal Dictionary, means that “the government cannot be sued without its consent.” This doctrine has applied to the federal government, states, public universities and Native American tribes for many years.

Saving the nation from the left’s bullies

As we’ve all been understandably focused on Hollywood’s Weinstein dumpster fire, a number of stories have emerged exposing the left’s continuing culture war, despite its meltdown in the film industry.

Illustration on salvaging the U.S./Iran nuclear agreement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s third way

President Trump made a tough call last week. European diplomats and an “echo chamber” in the mainstream media were insisting he “recertify” the nuclear weapons deal his predecessor concluded with Iran’s rulers in 2015.

The Clinton Protection Racquet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary and Harvey’s shared fate

I have been fascinated by Harvey Weinstein’s initial response to charges that the Bathrobed Romeo sexually molested women. His statement was at once otherworldly and yet weirdly similar to Hillary Clinton’s eventual response to the scandal. I say “eventual response” because it took her over a week to comment. Obviously, Hillary’s lawyers and public relations magicians had to word her response very carefully.

Illustration on the failure to "contain" Russia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How America has failed to contain Russia

Seventy years ago, George Kennan’s “Sources of Soviet Conduct” set the course for U.S. containment policy toward the Soviet Union. Following the Soviet Union’s collapse and a decade of economic turmoil which resulted in reduced Russian regional as well as global influence, President Vladimir Putin began implementing a national security strategy to resurrect Russia’s great power status. He wanted Russia to be perceived as equal in stature to the United States and to ensure western ideals of freedom, liberty, and democracy would not threaten his regime security.

Teaching the Birds and Bees at School Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How federally funded sex education sexualizes schoolchildren

Upon returning to middle school from an orthodontist appointment to tighten his braces, 12-year-old Johnny struggles through a pre-algebra lecture then schlepps off to his health class where he is instructed in anal sex, oral sex, masturbation and sexual fantasy.

William Dodd Jr. speaks on the radio during debate within the United States on whether to enter World War II. International News Service photo.

How Russians meddled in the 1938 election

Did Russia meddle in the 2016 presidential election? President Donald Trump emphatically says “no.” But the hierarchy of the U. S. intelligence community is equally firm in saying “yes.” With three probes in progress — two by Congress, another by an independent counsel — an answer perhaps will eventually be found.

Related Articles

Aaron Scott, left, prays during a service conducted by Rev. Sarah Monroe, right, at Chaplains on the Harbor church in Westport, Wash., Thursday, June 15, 2017. "I don't think our politicians know how high the stakes are here, and after so many years have gone by with our situation still as devastated as it is, I don't know if they care," Monroe says. "I'm not sure how much worse it can get, and at the same time I'm afraid to see how much worse it can get." (AP Photo/David Goldman)

At last, a president who protects our fundamental religious freedoms

The men who gathered to create our country and the Constitution were a varied group. Many of them were Christians, but some did not believe in the God of the Old and New Testaments. Yet, they proposed to establish a sovereign nation where people of all faiths and no faith would be welcome; where the freedom of conscience and religion would not be violated by the government. In a miracle of the ages, they succeeded in creating the first nation where both those who believe in God and those who don't are safe from government coercion.

Richard Cohen of the Southern Poverty Law Center. **FILE**

Making money on hate

These are not happy times for the Southern Poverty Law Center, which doesn't have a lot to do with the South, poverty or the law, and it thrives far from the center of the political spectrum. The center is mostly a cash machine, and it has raised hundreds of millions of dollars, mostly from well-meaning but gullible liberals — "progressives" in the current argot — in the name of fighting injustice and hate. Lately it has been called out as a hate group itself.

Left's gun-law hypocrisy

As expected from the radical left, in the face of the tragic mass killings in Las Vegas the words of comfort to the grieving are rushed through to get to the usual political message about guns and the gun lobby. Forgive me, but I would like to offer another view on the subject of taking away our gun rights in order to stop senseless killing.

From left, President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen, sing together during a National Prayer Service at the National Cathedral, in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

A mandate for religious freedom

Not so long ago, President Trump's new guidelines for the Department of Health and Human Services for protecting freedom of religious faith would have been superfluous and unnecessary. A casual observer might have read them in puzzlement, as if the government had reaffirmed its opposition to robbery or murder.

Donald Trump's new guidelines for protecting religious faith restore justice

The Washington Times

Not so long ago, President Trump's new guidelines for the Department of Health and Human Services for protecting freedom of religious faith would have been superfluous and unnecessary. A casual observer might have read them in puzzlement, as if the government had reaffirmed its opposition to robbery or murder.

EMP-burst danger not news

In "Congress seeks IG probe of radio" (Web, Oct. 4) Bill Gertz highlights aspects of a report produced by the Energy Department and the Electric Power Research Institute. The report concludes that more needs to be done to understand and respond to the electronic magnetic pulse (EMP) threat.

How Reagan was heir to the New Deal

It's true that Ronald Reagan began his political career in Hollywood as a Democrat, albeit a Democrat who fought the pervasive Communist influence in the screen unions of the day. And he would also campaign enthusiastically for Harry Truman, who was opposed by Henry Wallace, FDR's former vice president, and his Communist-tainted Progressive Party.

Participants in the Columbus Day Parade ride a float with a large bust of Christopher Columbus in New York. A movement to abolish Columbus Day and replace it with Indigenous Peoples Day has new momentum but the gesture to recognize victims of European colonialism has also prompted howls of outrage from some Italian Americans, who say eliminating their festival of ethnic pride is culturally insensitive, too. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Columbus deserves his day

- The Washington Times

In this era of Making America Great Again, it is true and wonderful to celebrate this great and glorious holiday and sing high praises for the good and daring adventurer who discovered America.

In this May 4, 2017, photo John Simpson, left, project director of exhibitions for The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum, and his wife Kay Simpson, right, president of Springfield Museums, unwrap a statue of the "Cat in the Hat," at the museum, in Springfield, Mass. The museum devoted to Dr. Seuss, which opened on June 3 in his hometown, features interactive exhibits, a collection of personal belongings and explains how the childhood experiences of the man, whose real name is Theodor Geisel, shaped his work. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Dr. Seuss character incredulously deemed racist

- The Washington Times

Is nothing sacred any longer? A Massachusetts museum that was created in honor of Dr. Seuss is under fire for a mural of a Chinese character from one of his books that critics say is stereotypical to the point of offensive.

President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing with Senior Military leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. Sitting on the left is Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump dumped on by ex-NBCer, who accuses anti-Semitism

- The Washington Times

Russia collusion it ain't, but the next scandal that appears to be looming over the White House involves a former NBC producer and his claim that President Donald Trump has been captured on camera making a number of "unfathomably despicable" racist, sexist and anti-Semitic comments.

In this Sept. 13, 2017, file photo activists of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) protest against the conflict between North Korea and the USA with masks of the North Korean ruler, Kim Jong-un, left, and U.S. President Donald Trump, right, in front of the U.S. Embassy in Berlin, Germany. (Britta Pedersen/dpa via AP)

Donald Trump -- decertify

- The Washington Times

Come Oct. 15, President Donald Trump may decertify the Iran nuclear deal, leaving Republicans in Congress to figure out how to manage the nuclear designs of the rogue nation. Trump should. Decertify away. The pact is nothing but a false hope of the previous administration.

Illustration on the controversy over Columbus Day by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Even worse than the Monday-holiday scheme

If you're confused that Columbus Day this year is not celebrated on the date mandated by historical fact, you're not alone. The holiday has sometimes been celebrated on the wrong day, even before Congress included Columbus Day in its Monday-holiday scheme in 1969.

President Donald Trump listens to Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo during a meeting with first responders at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, in Las Vegas. Associated Press photo

With neither bombast nor bravado, a presidential president

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump promised in his barnstorming campaign for president, with bombast and bravado, that once elected he would tone everything down and be "presidential." He was elected and we learned that, candidate or president, the Donald doesn't do presidential.

Nuclear Deal with Nobody Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why the U.S. should withdraw from the Iran deal

There is a season for acceptance and a season for rejection. When it comes to compliance with the Obama nuclear weapons deal, it is time to withdraw completely at the congressionally mandated October 15 certification deadline.

Investigators load a body from the scene of a mass shooting at a music festival near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip on Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

The Las Vegas massacre

The investigation into the Las Vegas mass murderer who killed at least 58 people and wounded nearly 500 in a hail of gunfire is still searching for a motive in the massacre.