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In this Sept. 30, 2014, file photo, Gordon Kamara, left, is sprayed by Konah Deno after they loaded six patients suspected to have been infected by the Ebola virus into their ambulance in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia. *AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)

It’s the Ebola incompetence, stupid

There are a few things in the world that we know for sure, including the existence of Ebola, what those infected go through, and the fact that, as of now, there is no cure or official universal treatment that mitigate its fatality rate said to be around 70 percent.

Illustration of Charles Hagel by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

BABBIN: The Pentagon’s war on the global climate

The Pentagon’s “2014 Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap,” published last week, demonstrates how thoroughly and deeply liberal “climate change” ideology is being embedded in our military establishment.

Illustration on U. S. Ebola preparedness by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

BURR: Making Ebola preparedness a priority

It is unsettling that in discussing shortfalls in the federal government’s response to the Ebola crisis, some Beltway observers have resorted to the traditional Washington shell game: blame the budget.

Illustration on the dangers of the ucontroled southern border by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

McCAUL: Securing the border to keep Americans safe

Over the past few months, Americans have witnessed the many threats the United States faces. It is my job as the chairman of the U.S. House Homeland Security Committee to help keep these threats out of the country.

Pumped up: Salym Petroleum Development workers soon could be drilling for shale, or tight, oil. A venture between Gazprom Neft and Shell have announced plans to drill the first horizontal appraisal well in Russia. (Associated Press)

MOORE: Oil, the real economic stimulus

American workers and motorists got some badly needed relief last week when the price of oil plunged to its lowest level in years. The oil price has fallen by about 20 percent since its peak back in June of $105 a barrel.

Illustration by TOM,Trouw, Amsterdam, Netherlands

SADAR: Backward to the future

The message is clear from the mounds of People’s Climate March literature littering the landscape: “Progressives” want to take us back to the “good old days,” when life was brutal, banal and brief.

Illustration on the political abandonment of the failing Obama administration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

ALLARD: Fleeing the Leaky Ship Obama

Call it a sign of the times. Like when Ben Affleck was so conflicted recently about the Islamist threat that he raised doubts about whether he had actually watched “Argo,” the blockbuster he produced and starred in about how the CIA used trickery to rescue Americans from Tehran.

FILE - This undated file image made available by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) shows the Ebola virus. In a second, smaller Ebola outbreak, at least 69 people, including eight health workers, are believed to have been infected according to a study that was led by the World Health Organization and researchers from France and Canada and published online Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014, by the New England Journal of Medicine. The outbreak that began in July in the Democratic Republic of Congo is similar to earlier ones in that central African region, genetic testing of viruses shows. (AP Photo/Centers for Disease Control, File)

CHARLES: Ebola, more vital facts untold

With countless unknowns surrounding the recent discovery, transmission, infection rates, and potentially exponential growth of Ebola in the United States in the months ahead, trust is vital.

The deadly virus in the electorate

- The Washington Times

Sometimes incompetence gets its due reward. No one has to accuse Barack Obama of spreading the Ebola virus. The incompetence of this administration is there for everyone to see, and suffer. “Leading from behind” works no better against a deadly virus than it has against evil in the Middle East and greedy ambition in Ukraine.

Illustration on income inequality by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

FEIN: In praise of income inequality

Simple justice dictates that economic prosperity turn on individual skill, foresight, industry and risk-taking — traits which vary across the broad spectrum of the human species like a bell-shaped curve.

March for Life vs. Obamacare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MONAHAN: Obamacare, or abortion care?

For almost 41 years, my organization has hosted a rally and march on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Perhaps you have seen us — as the largest pro-life gathering in the world.

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Illustration on the history of the 26th Amendment by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The 26th Amendment's distressing history

Earlier this year, South Dakota's legislature ratified the 26th Amendment to the Constitution, prohibiting the federal government, states and localities from denying 18-year-old citizens the right to vote.

Gov. Rick Perry   Associated Press photo

A virus, media boobs and the perfect storm

- The Washington Times

Some boobs in the media, which now include dozens of Internet websites where anything goes, the wilder and more improbable the better, are up to their usual standard of irresponsibility. The screamers are telling us that Ebola will soon kill us all, many of us at least twice.

Yazidi Rescue Mission Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Remembering the Yazidis under siege

President Obama heralded the U.S. military mission to rescue the Yazidis trapped on an Iraqi mountain as a ringing success, but to those still struggling to escape the horrors of the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, it is an ongoing battle.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Killing Patton'

KILLING PATTON: THE STRANGE DEATH OF WORLD WAR II'S MOST AUDACIOUS GENERAL

FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2014 file photo, thousands of people block a main road in Hong Kong as activists kick off a long-threatened mass civil disobedience protest to challenge Beijing over restrictions on voting reforms. The legacy of the 1989 crackdown in Tiananmen Square looms larger in Hong Kong than in mainland China, where the Communist Party has virtually erased all public mention of it. In this former British colony, hundreds of thousands attend candlelight vigils each anniversary to commemorate the grim end to the Beijing movement that was vanquished before many of the pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong's streets were even born. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)

KEENE: The heroism of Hong Kong

The biggest story right now isn't ISIS or Ebola or the Secret Service: it's what's happening in the streets of Hong Kong.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories'

A book that captures a child's love, devotion and imagination is a prized possession, indeed. If this book can transcend generations and changing attitudes, it should be regarded as legendary.

President Barack Obama speaks at the League of Conservation Voters Capitol Dinner at the Ronald Reagan Building on Wednesday, June 25, 2014, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

EDITORIAL: The league of crony voters

The League of Conservation Voters is going all in with $25 million on the table in a desperate gamble to keep the Senate in Democratic hands. "This is five times more than what we spent in 2010," Daniel Weiss, a senior vice president of the league, tells a C-SPAN interviewer.

Illustration on mistrusting government information on ISIS and Ebola by Hunter/The Washington Times

Hiding the truth about ISIS and Ebola

The Ebola virus is not a threat, but the Islamic State is. That's what some of our leaders tell us. Should we believe them? Do they have a track record for truth-telling that would lend them credibility?

Illustration by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

NIKPOUR: The GOP, minorities, and fundraising

The Republicans should be reaching out to all minorities, but when it comes to fundraising, they're missing a major opportunity to reach out to wealthy minorities.