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Centennial High School senior Doyle Trout, left, and his classmates react as his childhood and high school photographs appear on the screen during the senior slide show during graduation on Saturday, May 16, 2015. Trout, a four-time state wrestling champion who lost his left leg in an accident, is going to the University of Wyoming on a wrestling scholarship. Wyoming is honoring Trout's scholarship, and he hopes to wrestle again someday but doing that won't be easy.(Francis Gardler/The Journal-Star via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; KOLN-TV OUT; KGIN-TV OUT; KLKN-TV OUT

What I know: advice for the real world

Make the face you show the world—in interviews, on the job, socially and professionally—the reflection of what’s in your heart and mind.

Paula Jones smiles during a news conference in Dallas, in this April 16, 1998, file photo. Encouraged by an outside lawyer, Paula Jones is ready to insist on $2 million, half from President Clinton and half from a New York tycoon, in exchange for dropping her sexual harassment lawsuit, two legal sources involved in the case said Saturday, Oct. 17, 1998. (AP Photo/LM Otero) ** FILE **

Paula Jones: Reprise of a famous bimbo eruption

- The Washington Times

For the Republicans, worthy or not, Hillary and Bubba are the gift that keeps on giving. Whoever is responsible for writing the thank-you notes has a big job ahead. The dynamic duo keep a network of warehouses just to house and keep track of the gifts. No wonder Hillary needs her own Internet server.

Illustration on the move to remove Andrew Jackson from the twenty dollar bill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The cheap currency of judging historical figures by today’s standards

New York Times columnist Gail Collins is on a tear. Her sense of civic rectitude oozes from her prose. Her characteristic breezy haughtiness is on full display. The moral imperative that has caught her fancy and led to two columns in as many months: Getting that angular-faced Andrew Jackson off the $20 bill and replacing him with a woman, preferably an African-American or American Indian.

Illustration on Net Neutrality by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New rules make the Internet’s future look very 20th century

Like a thief in the night, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently denied eight separate petitions requesting the agency delay the implementation of new Internet regulations while they are challenged in court. While the late-afternoon news dump and decision was predictable, it is no less disappointing that the Internet will soon be subjected to 20th century telephone monopoly-era regulations.

No substitute for seriousness in Iraq

A recent weekend brought two very different dispatches from the front lines of the global war on terror. The first was a tale of tactical success; the second a narrative of strategic failure.

Positive Messages Hit the Mark Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Conservatism, the Chevy of American leadership

Imagine General Motors trying to sell you a Chevy truck by airing an ad featuring a Ford F-150 pickup truck bursting into flames, killing a family of four and ending with anguished relatives waiting for news of their loved ones in a hospital emergency room.

Illustration on adjusting Section 215 of the Patriot Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Amending the Patriot Act, not ending it

The Senate, which will never be known for an overly demanding work schedule, returns from its week-long recess a whole day early to deal with the mess being made of one of our most important anti-terrorist intelligence programs. That program, now encompassed by Section 215 of the unfortunately named Patriot Act, has its roots in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, or FISA.

Illistration on adjusting Export-Import bank policies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A Reaganesque solution to the Ex-Im Bank dilemma

Opposition to the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im) is now at the point where the bank’s reauthorization is genuinely in doubt. Spurred by accusations of corporate welfare, crony capitalism and outright corruption, opponents believe the Ex-Im Bank’s palpable violation of free-market principles fully warrants its early demise.

Related Articles

President Barack Obama pauses during a meeting with Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, and Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Wednesday, May 13, 2015, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. The president said the derailment of Amtrak Train 188 "is a tragedy that touches us all." In a statement, Obama said he is offering prayers to the families who lost loved ones and the passengers beginning to recover.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The Democrats put Obama in a stew

A filibuster led by Democrats derailed President Obama's request for the fast-track authority that would require the U.S. Senate to vote up-or-down on the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement. The negotiations, the filibuster and the fix the president has put himself in says everything about the differing Republican and Democratic positions on trade. It says a lot, too, about Mr. Obama's ineptitude in dealing his own congressional partisans.

Illustration on the Clintons' suspected pay-for-play activities by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Following the 'Clinton Cash'

In writing "Clinton Cash," author Peter Schweizer has certainly done a major public service by revealing the stories behind the Bill Clinton speeches and the donations to the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation through the end of 2014. But what other ways might a person or organization make big buck donations to Team Clinton?

Cheating to win is losing

Respect. Honesty. Sportsmanship. Fair play. As professional athletics continue to proclaim these values, it becomes more difficult to explain their demise to children. Advising youngsters that cheaters who win are really losers — as these children witness ostensible professionals cheat their way to trophies and rings — makes it tough to direct those kids to the moral high ground in their own athletic endeavors.

Rebels without a cause

As a Marine Corps second lieutenant in 1971, the first article I wrote for the Marine Corps Gazette addressed the real possibility of an urban civil war in which the military might be called on to fight radical elements of my own generation who were advocating and actively working for the violent overthrow of the United States government.

Illustration on declining educational standards for history and civics by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

American amnesia

America received its history and civics report card recently, but there won't be any bumper stickers boasting of making the honor roll. The release of the U.S. Department of Education's latest National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) for history, civics and geography shows that we are raising another generation of historical and civic amnesiacs.

What GOP must do in 2016

One of President George W. Bush's primary reasons for authorizing the invasion of Iraq in 2003 was to eliminate the threat of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Bush's rush to war, known as Operation Iraqi Freedom, was criticized because no WMD ever were uncovered. Still, U.S. forces remained there (and then in Afghanistan) for years.

Baltimore's problems are not rooted in racist police

Attorney General Loretta Lynch has announced a Justice Department investigation to determine whether the Baltimore Police Department's practices are unconstitutional and violate civil rights; in short, whether or not the police force there is racist. It will come as no surprise if the investigation concludes that it is, because accusing the department of racism diverts attention from the city's real problem: Baltimore, a laboratory for liberal policies, is a failed city that has shortchanged the poor for decades.

Illustration contrasting the content of two recent addresses by Michelle Obama by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The first lady and the race card

Michelle Obama can give as good as she gets, and she's getting a hard time from conservatives over two speeches she gave last week. The first was a commencement speech at Tuskegee University in Alabama, and the other was at the opening of the new Whitney Museum of American Art in downtown New York City.

Illustration on the continued erosion of liberty under the Freedom Act by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Rand and Ted on the Fourth Amendment

A decision last week about National Security Agency spying by a panel of judges on the United States Court of Appeals in New York City sent shock waves through the government. The court ruled that a section of the Patriot Act that is due to expire at the end of this month and on which the government has relied as a basis for its bulk acquisition of telephone data during the past 14 years does not authorize that acquisition.

Illustration on fetal pain by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pain-capable opponents ignore science

When I became a nurse more than 40 years ago, I took a vow to "devote myself to the welfare of those committed to my care" but, initially, our understanding of science limited the extent to which I could fulfill that promise.

The Libertarian Party has launched a lawsuit against the Presidential Debate Commission to gain access for third party candidates at the official 2016 presidential debates (Our American Initiative)

Libertarian Party sues for access to presidential debates, calls exclusion 'unfair and illegal'

- The Washington Times

Independent and third party candidates have yet to stand on flashy podiums of officially sanctioned presidential debates. Now the Libertarian Party is pushing back. Fed up with its ongoing exclusion - and the valuable national exposure that is beyond their reach - the Libertarians now plans a lawsuit against the "duopoly" of Republican and Democratic candidates who have a guaranteed national forum - when alternative candidates do not.

Whose embassy is this?

Barack Obama's romance with the Castro brothers is rapidly turning into a sour shack-up. That's what happens sometimes to romances under a tropic moon and the rustle of the coconut palms. Cuba wants to redefine the sanctity of embassies, and how they function. The public still doesn't know what concessions the president is making to keep a flame under the romance, but it doesn't sound good for our side.

'Go the distance' to Cleveland

As Kevin Costner contemplated what to do in the iconic "Field of Dreams," a voice from on high gave him advice he would follow throughout the film: "Go the distance."

In this photo taken April 28, 2015, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks in San Juan, Puerto Rico. When Hillary Rodham Clinton takes the stage at fundraisers thrown by a group that wants to elect her president, she’s not a White House candidate. She’s a “special guest.” When Jeb Bush fundraises for a group preparing to run major parts of his all-but-certain presidential campaign, he doesn’t personally ask for money. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

Jeb Bush doubles down

Jeb Bush has grave differences with the Republicans who will nominate a candidate for president next summer in Cleveland -- differences on immigration, Common Core, and now on his brother's conduct of the war in Iraq. Mr. Bush winces at the notion that he's the "moderate" Republican that so many in his party think he is.

Illustrtation on the need for a U.S.response to China's world strategy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Getting real about China

Three times in April the Obama administration allowed the Pentagon to issue uncharacteristically expansive and blunt warnings over China's growing threat. However welcome, this trend is late in forming and must now be followed by more vigorous action to ensure China remains deterred.

Climate needs both parties

I am saddened to watch both our state and federal governments continue to argue about climate change. It doesn't make sense to make the essentially permanent changes to the Earth's physics and chemistry that we are making without looking closely at this together, across political divides, with open eyes and open hearts.

Illustration on Michael Silverstein's bid for the presidency by Alewxander Hunter/The Washington Times

Silverstein throws his hat into the ring

While nobody has actually asked me to run for president of the United States, I have begun to sense a yearning for me to do so emanating from the ranks of the still-uncommitted silent majority.

Stop catering to absurd

On the morning of April 25, CNN announced that a devastating earthquake had occurred in Nepal. At the time, there were only a 100 known deaths, but at a magnitude of 7.8 the impending doom was evident. What was even more astounding was that this story only received a couple of minutes' coverage. The main story, which was exploited for the next 10 minutes, was the Bruce Jenner interview with Diane Sawyer that had aired the previous night.