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Illustration on the processing of national security intelligence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to presidential campaign advisers

This memorandum is addressed to the brave souls advising presidential candidates. As you know, the recent terrorist attacks in France — and in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Israel — have altered the political landscape. With less than a year to go before the 2016 election, the landscape may stay altered even if there are no more attacks — and that seems unlikely.

NATO Safe Area for Refugees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Responding to humanitarian catastrophe

The international community just celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Accords, a landmark peace agreement that brought an end to the Bosnian War and a grave humanitarian crisis in the Balkans.

Illustration on the need for streamlines conceal carry permits in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/the Washington Times

Fighting ISIS with concealed carry

Following the recent Paris attacks, the Islamic State recently announced its intention to “strike America at its center,” in Washington, D.C. Our response should be swift and decisive.

The Approval of Technical Wrong Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the gun-ignorant make gun laws

When the state of Maryland quietly killed off its 15-year, $5 million social experiment in gun control — so-called “ballistic fingerprinting” — it served up the latest example of people who know nothing about firearms making technical laws about guns. The news of this latest failure (not a single crime solved in 15 years) followed New York shutting down a similar program, and it generated from gun owners and gun makers a tired “We told you so.”

Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon           Associated Press photo

A military witch hunt that almost succeeded

Along with many Americans, I salute The Washington Times for having the courage to not only report on the Air Force general court martial persecution-prosecution of Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon, but to continue following this case with a series of updates from the courtroom trial in Minot, N.D., until the court martial concluded on Nov. 14.

MS St. Louis, 1939. The Voyage of Doom.

Stopping the next Holocaust

By now, in the days following the Paris massacre and the Brussels lockdown, many Americans have been reminded of the awful fate of the S.S. Saint Louis. In 1939, fleeing the impending doom of the Holocaust, some 900 Jews boarded the cruise ship in Hamburg, Germany, and crossed the Atlantic.

Former President George W. Bush speaks at the George W. Bush Institute at Southern Methodist University in Dallas on Feb. 19, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

How Obama cooks the terrorism numbers

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama has given an eloquent testimony to a Christian faith, but his sympathies are always with Islam. He insisted from Asia that “99.9 percent of Muslims worldwide reject terrorism,” and that’s good news, if true. But it clearly is not.

Persecution of Christians by Muslims Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No Christians and persecuted minorities allowed

Standing before the cameras in Turkey, President Obama found his safe place to indict half his countrymen for raising the issue of religion in their concern over his plan to open America’s gates to tens of thousands of Muslim “refugees” from Syria. Subjecting refugees to a religious test runs counter to American values, said Mr. Obama.

Black-eye Friday Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Wal-Mart’s protests won’t sell

For most Americans, Black Friday is the time to shop around for great deals on new Christmas gifts. For Big Labor, it’s an opportunity to steal the headlines and advance its agenda.

An Israeli policeman collects evidence next to a body of a Palestinian attacker at a West Bank petrol station near Jerusalem, Monday, Nov. 23, 2015. A Palestinian stabbed an Israeli man to death before he was shot dead by security forces. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)

Where terror lurks every day

Think back to October 2002, when the Beltway sniper and his young accomplice paralyzed the Washington region for three weeks, sowing fear and keeping people from pumping gas, buying groceries, holding soccer practices or venturing from their homes. Ponder what just happened in Paris.

Illustration on President Obama, the tortured genius by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

President Obama, a ‘tortured genius’

A U.S. Navy SEAL teammate and friend once described the worst type of leader as a “tortured genius.” By this, he did not mean the artist or musician suffering from inspired hysteria, but someone who, no matter how obvious the failing or how fair and valid the criticism, accepts no blame and denies all responsibility. In the mind of such a leader, the rest of the world simply can’t see the “genius” in what they do.

Confused about the enemy

Since the horrific Paris terror attacks, President Obama and the Democrats want you to think that defending ourselves from Islamic terrorism will only make things worse. Bombing the Islamic State, you see, will make it easier for them to recruit.

Illustration on refugees and the visa waiver program by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Entering the country visa-free

In the wake of the Paris terrorist attacks, Americans are more worried than ever about an attack on the United States. Their concerns are aggravated when they hear Washington debating the Visa Waiver Program (VWP), something most people had never heard of before. But it is critical to the security of our nation. The Visa Waiver Program allows visa-free entry to our country.

Selfish Protests on Campus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The grievance generation

Remember the campus unrest in the 1960s? Whether you agreed with the students or not, they were protesting about things of great consequence — like civil rights, or the military draft, or the Vietnam War. They had chants like “hell no, we won’t go.” Those were the good old days.

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Illustration on maintaining a balance of Pacific trade with the U.S. by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Choosing concession over protection

"When politicians can determine what can be bought and sold, the first thing to be bought and sold will be politicians." -- Mark Twain

BOOK REVIEW: 'Hitler at Home'

How did Adolf Hitler go from a figure of fun often likened to Charlie Chaplin's tramp to the leader so beloved by the bulk of Germany's population, no matter what they claimed in this regard after he had brought unheard-of mayhem, destruction and shame on them and their nation?

Bad Policy for Cyber Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A cybersecurity bill only a politician could love

As Congress moves to reconcile each chamber's version of the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), civil liberties organizations and technology companies alike continue to pan the bill for threatening consumer privacy and covertly expanding government surveillance programs.

Fox News prime time host Bill O'Reilly  (Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invsion/AP, file)

Bill O'Reilly tops voter poll for most preferred GOP debate moderator

- The Washington Times

The next Republican debate looms on Tuesday night, and at last a pollster has asked GOP voters who they really want on the podium as moderator. Given a choice of seven primarily conservative or right leaning broadcasters, and here is how they ranked them, according to a new Vox Populi survey: Fox News prime time host Bill O'Reilly was in first place with 25 percent of the vote/

Say no to Kosovo in UNESCO

Recently the authorities of the self-proclaimed Republic of Kosovo have filed application for membership in UNESCO. This request is not only legally unacceptable, it is morally and logically absurd.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a press conference at the prime minister's official residence  in Tokyo, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

The new player from Japan

This week Japan Post Holdings, where many Japanese put their household savings, began the privatization of one of the largest accumulations of capital in the world. The 144-year-old Japanese postal system, originally modeled after state corporations in France and Germany, sold shares in Japan Post Bank, which holds $1.5 trillion in Japanese household savings deposits, and Japan Post Insurance.

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg speaks during a media conference at NATO headquarters in Brussels on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

Rising to the challenge

Nowhere in the muddle of Barack Obama's foreign policy, such as it is, are contradictions so apparent as in America's relations with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

Trump the straw man

Has the star of the faux reality show "The Apprentice" tapped into a vein of discontent in America, and is he leveraging it to make "America Great again?"

Illustration on wounded women soldiers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Homeless wounded women warriors

Like most patriotic Americans, I was proud to learn last August that two women -- Capt. Kristin Griest and Lt. Shaye Haver -- had earned their black and gold Ranger tabs to join the U.S. Army's most prestigious unit.

Illustration on the first Armistice Day by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The first Armistice Day, 1919

On Nov. 11, 1919, the United States observed the first Armistice Day signifying the end of World War I in 1918. For most American communities it was a day solemnized by patriotic parades, prayer meetings and dinners honoring servicemen who had served in the war.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Nov. 9, 2015

On the economy give Obama a D

Hillary Rodham Clinton got the laugh line of the week when she said that President Obama deserves "an A" for his economic performance. Oh, wait. she wasn't joking.

Pharmaceutical Profiteering Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Addressing high drug prices

What do Sen. Marco Rubio, Sen. Bernard Sanders and Hillary Rodham Clinton have in common? They're all talking about the skyrocketing cost of prescription drugs in America. They disagree on almost everything else, but this issue is too big to be ignored.

BOOK REVIEW: 'People!: A Memoir'

Readers who remember Mel Brooks' hilarious routines as the Two Thousand Year Old Man -- the quintessential old Jewish codger who has seen it all, knows it all, and is going to tell you all about it -- will have no trouble enjoying "People!," veteran journalist Sol Sanders' rambling, far-reaching and often moving memoir.

In this undated file photo released by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, militants of the Islamic State group hold up their weapons and wave flags as they ride in a convoy, which includes multiple Toyota pickup trucks, through Raqqa city in Syria on a road leading to Iraq. (Militant website via AP, File)

ISIS Now Has Spy Free Communications

- The Washington Times

Thanks to two Russian immigrants in Germany, who fled the Russian Federation last year after threats from the Kremlin, terrorists have access to a non-profit, social media messaging site that cannot be spied upon. In a nutshell, the service called Telegram, can deliver messages that are totally secure, can self-destruct, are delivered fast, and can be used on multiple devices.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., listens to a student's question at a town hall meeting at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015.  (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)

A new tune for Bernie Sanders

Vermont's favorite Socialist has watched his early advantage over Hilary Clinton dissipate and now he thinks that maybe he isn't as tired of her "damn emails" as he thought he was. Maybe he should stick to talking about how to redistribute the nation's wealth and punish those who create jobs and economic growth.