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Protesters listen to speakers at a demonstration against a proposed ban of transgendered people in the military in the Castro District, Wednesday, July 26, 2017, in San Francisco. Demonstrators flocked to a plaza named for San Francisco gay-rights icon Harvey Milk to protest President Donald Trumps abrupt ban on transgender troops in the military. (AP Photo/Olga R. Rodriguez)

Another burden for Willie and Joe

- The Washington Times

The Army and the other military services can do a lot of things, and never flinch when the nation calls. Now, Donald Trump to the contrary notwithstanding, the services have been “tasked” to make women and transgendered people feel better about their place in society. Isn’t that what an army’s for?

Illustration on the prospect of dealing with tax reform by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The challenge of lowering taxes

Republican leaders are anxious to pivot from health care to tax reform but their optimism is misplaced.

Illustration on Liberian Independence Day and its history by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘It was the love of liberty that brought us here’

“It was the love of liberty that brought us here.” So runs Liberia’s national motto — a country founded by freed slaves, which declared its independence on July 26, 1847, 170 years ago. It was thus that Liberia became the first republic in Africa — one born under the principles of freedom and democracy.

The Attempt to Ban Dog Walking in Bay Area Parks Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why this dog rule must be rescinded

Last week, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced that one of his top priorities is to expand recreational access to public lands and waters. He should start this quest in the San Francisco Bay Area, where National Park Service staff are trying to push through a controversial rule to cut one of the most popular recreation activities in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area — dog walking.

Russian President Vladimir Putin answers questions during a news conference after his talks with and Finnish President Sauli Niinisto in Savonlinna, Eastern Finland, on Thursday, July 27, 2017. President Putin pays a working visit to Finland to discuss bilateral and international issues with his Finnish counterpart and to commemorate Finland's 100-year independence. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Conservatives shouldn’t be Putin’s ‘useful idiots’

I have been hearing a lot of comments lately from conservatives that Russia is not our enemy, that President Vladimir Putin is a great guy, a strong leader who loves his country and is simply standing up to the globalist European Union. Mr. Putin and Russia, I’m told, are standing up for Christianity and providing security for Christians from Islamist extremists.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., leads fellow Democratic Senators to meet supporters outside the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 25, 2017, after the Senate voted to start debating Republican legislation to tear down much of the Obama health care law. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democrats’ ‘better deal’ is a raw deal

Theodore Roosevelt offered Americans a “Square Deal.” His fifth cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, gave us “The New Deal.” Modern Democrats, who have lost election after election, are now offering the country “A Better Deal.”

Passengers embark on a Princeton Branch New Jersey Transit train after a service disruption due to a lack of train engineers to operate it, Tuesday, July 18, 2017, in Princeton, N.J. The train is also known as the Dinky, as the train runs only a 2.7-mile route from Princeton Junction station in West Windsor, N.J., to Princeton University. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens) ** FILE**

Princeton on the prowl to emasculate men

- The Washington Times

Princeton University just announced a new position, the “Interpersonal Violence Clinician and Men’s Engagement Manager.” They’re seeking qualified candidates now. The best will be the man who most acts like a woman.

Hacking the Vote Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Maintaining vigilance against election hackers

This week, hackers from across the globe are gathering in Las Vegas at the annual DEF CON conference for an exercise ripped straight from news headlines — trying to hack U.S. election systems. It’s a unique exercise that has raised a lot of eyebrows in the election community. For me, it’s yet another moment to focus on the topic of election system security and the need for constant vigilance.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman    Associated Press photo

The Iran dilemma of the Saudi crown prince

The starting point for any policy that the new crown prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammed bin Salman, adopts toward the Islamic Republic of Iran is to understand two basic facts.

Illustration on the president's struggles with Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his Justice Department by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An unnecessary clash between Trump and Sessions

During the past two weeks, President Trump has made no secret of his unhappiness at the management of the Department of Justice (DOJ) under Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Actually, Mr. Trump seems most agitated at the growing parts of the Justice Department that are not under Mr. Sessions’ management.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, left, joined by Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price, speaks to media aboard Air Force One, Monday, July 24, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route to the 2017 National Scout Jamboree in Glen Jean, W.Va. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

‘Conform or else’: Democrats bully conservative women, minorities

On Monday, the Democrats were really excited about their new slogan, “A Better Deal: Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Wages.” Widely ridiculed for being idiotic, here’s a slogan they could have chosen, which is much more honest about the current liberal agenda: “A Bully’s Deal: If You Ever Think For Yourself and Don’t Conform, We’ll Ruin Your Life.”

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China Steel Dumping Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting American steelworkers first

As President Trump returns from his first G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, we are reminded that some countries do not want to see America grow stronger and be a beacon for freedom around the globe. During his historic inauguration speech while speaking about the decline of American industry, Mr. Trump made clear that "this American carnage stops right here and stops right now." It's clear that the carnage that has taken place in U.S. industries such as steel and aluminum needs to come to an end. As Mr. Trump has said repeatedly, we need to "buy American and hire American."

Illustration on Trump's direct communication with the American people through his Twitter messages by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

President Trump's tweets

I admit, I'm a real fan of President Trump's tweets. It's an uncensored, uninhibited and direct way for him to react and communicate "his take" on daily events. Even though his lawyers may cringe and wish he wouldn't tweet, it has changed -- forever -- the "natural order of things" in Washington D.C., a city forever in love with itself.

Illustration on the fallacious 1992 report claiming a 19 percent minimum wage increase in New Jersey raised the rate of fast food employment in that state by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When minimum wage surveys are flawed and misleading

It was "fake news" before anyone was familiar with the term: The claim that a 19 percent minimum wage increase in New Jersey in 1992 caused an increase in fast food employment compared to neighboring Pennsylvania.

Voters Registered in Perpetuity Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tracing the range of voter fraud

The media came unhinged over President Trump's Advisory Commission on Voter Integrity. CNN falsely claimed that 44 states had stonewalled requests for voter data, when only 14 had done so. Media outlets screamed "voter intimidation!" Their fury suggests that Mr. Trump is onto something really big.

Gilbert Public Schools in Arizona is defending its decision to place pro-abstinence, anti-abortion stickers in its biology textbooks, following complaints from pro-choice parents. (Twitter/@suzanne_young)

What's up and what's down in American culture

Say you want to know which direction the numbers in the U.S. are heading when it comes to welfare dependency. Or you're curious about the divorce rate, or how bad teen drug use is. Or you're wondering about unemployment or what the high-school graduation rate is.

Loss of Freedom Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When legal protections begin to disappear

Do you mainly fear government or feel protected by it? The American Founders wrote a Constitution and designed a system of government that sharply limited the powers of the state --because they understood that the greatest danger to the liberty of the people was the necessary evil of government.

Ronald Reagan on the Tonight Show in 1975          The Washington Times

'Here's Ronnie!'

While scanning YouTube videos, I came across an appearance by Ronald Reagan on "The Tonight Show," hosted by Johnny Carson. The year was 1975 and Mr. Reagan was "between jobs," having left office as governor of California, where he served for eight years, but not yet president. He would challenge Gerald Ford for the Republican nomination in 1976, barely losing at the nominating convention, but setting himself up for what would be a successful run in 1980.

The Cromwell behind the creation of the British Empire

An unfortunate side-effect of the otherwise admirable success of Hilary Mantel's novel "Wolf Hall" and its subsequent blockbuster television and stage adaptations has been a tendency to make its protagonist, the relatively minor figure Henry VIII's chief minister Thomas Cromwell, eclipse his hitherto far more famous collateral descendant Oliver Cromwell.

Gov. Kate Brown reacts to a moment in a video played after the House of Representatives enacted Sine Die to adjourn the legislative session at the state Capitol in Salem, Ore. on Friday, July 7, 2017. The Oregon Legislature has adjourned the 2017 session that saw the passage of record-funding for schools, a long-term transportation package, gun restrictions, cost-free abortions and health care funding for Medicaid and undocumented immigrants. (Anna Reed/Statesman-Journal via AP)

Oregon's abortion business gets weirder

Oregon's state motto is "Alis volat propriis," Latin for "She flies with her own wings." It's nice sentiment, full of boast and swagger, but the bird aspires to be a cuckoo, with two left wings making it difficult to fly straight.

Who's mentally ill?

You hear more and more people claiming that President Trump is mentally ill and unfit for his office. But if we consider the sources, very often the case can be made that the accusers themselves are the mentally ill ones.

This is an undated image made available by the World Wildlife Fund Finland of a Saimaa Ringed Seal as it rests on a rock in Lake Saimaa, Finland. Wildlife conservationists in Finland are giving endangered seals in Europe's fourth largest lake a spot of online fame _ they plan to stream encounters with some of the estimated 360 remaining seals in southeastern lake of Saimaa, in a bid to raise awareness of their plight.  (Ismo Marttinen/WWF Finland via AP)

To the Finland Station

While the United States debates whether it has "a Russian problem," and who's responsible for it, 6 million wary Finns know they have such a problem. It's inherited, and they're fearful again of a wrestling match with an old foe.

Make states pay for illegal voting

To their everlasting shame, California and other liberal states have refused to release data on voters to President Trump's voter fraud commission. This is understandable considering that the number of illegal aliens voting in our elections was recently estimated at 5.7 million. Illegal-alien voter fraud is undoubtedly the only way that Democrats can win with the country so evenly divided. That's why they pander to illegals with welfare entitlements, sanctuary cities and open borders.

In this May 10, 2016, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un waves at parade participants at the Kim Il-sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

North Korea may have more nuclear weapons material than previously thought

- The Washington Times

North Korea may have produced more nuclear bomb-making material than analysts previously thought, according to a report by the website, 38 North. Thermal images taken of the Yongbyon nuclear plant from September to the end of June show that increased production of plutonium, as well as enriched uranium, was possible.

Caitlyn Jenner poses for a portrait on Monday, April 24, 2017, in New York to promote her memoir, "The Secrets of My Life." (Photo by Taylor Jewell/Invision/AP)

Caitlyn Jenner on mission to sensitize GOP

- The Washington Times

The Jenner formerly known as Bruce, but name-changed to Caitlyn, is on a mission to change the Republican Party and make its members more sensitive to LGBT issues. That's fine and dandy. But sensitive shouldn't mean lying.

In this Feb. 10, 2012, file photo, Ann Coulter gestures while speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington. Delta pushed back at Coulter after the conservative commentator berated the carrier on Twitter over a changed seat assignment for a July 15, 2017, flight from New York to West Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Delta's ticked -- but Ann Coulter's right

- The Washington Times

Ann Coulter unleashed a storm of fiery tweets against Delta over a switched seat. And an offended Delta tried to defend itself. But Coulter's quite right and moreover, Americans are sick of being treated by airlines like chattel.

Nothing Burger Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Charging treason and ruining a republic

The latest nothingburger ablaze on the media grill is that Donald Trump Jr. may have committed treason when he met with a woman he believed to be an agent of the Russian government who claimed to possess information that Hillary Clinton had colluded with that country.

Illustration on the Cruz Amendment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Ted Cruz rescued Republicans on Obamacare

Finally, Republicans are getting smart on Obamacare. It took one of the savviest Republican senators --Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas with an assist from Sen. Mike Lee of Utah -- to get the GOP to figure out how to replace Obamacare, reduce premiums and save money for the government -- all without alienating millions of voters. He's pulled the Republicans' fannies out of the fire by flipping a political losing strategy into a big time winner.