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Illustration on acid attacks on women in Iran by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran’s acid attacks on women

In Iran’s Isfahan province, protesters gathered in the streets late last month to decry a series of attacks in which women were badly burned with acid.

Peter Finch Mad as Hell Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The coming Ebola election bounce

Ebola has claimed the lives of some 4,800 West Africans — possibly closer to 15,000, given underreporting. It might also be about to claim Democrats in Tuesday’s midterm elections and further damage Barack Obama’s presidency.

Panelists take part in a discussion during the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission National Conference on Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014, in Nashville, Tenn. From left are Sam Allberry, associate pastor of St. Mary’s Maidenhead, in Berkshire, England, Rosaria Butterfield, and Christopher Yuan. Southern Baptists organized the three-day event to strengthen the resolve of Christians preaching the increasingly unpopular view that gay relationships are sinful. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Media-speak muddies midterm issues

Progressives and their media water boys use language as a weapon. Their success often depends on changing the terms of the debate.

Marriage, the surest economic stimulus

This may be a surprising statement from a bleary-eyed, number-crunching economist, but the best anti-poverty program in America may not be tax cuts, debt reduction or regulatory relief, but rather that old-fashioned institution called marriage.

Illustration by AMMER, Weiner Zeitung, Vienna, Austria

Ebola response ignores history’s lessons

The last time we treated a deadly disease as a political problem instead of using time-tested medical precautions, we doomed many hemophiliacs to early deaths, along with hundreds of thousands of homosexual men.

The Iran Nuclear Compliance Meter (Illustration by Paul Combs of the Tribune Media Services)

GRENELL: The midterm elections and Iran

The midterm elections may be the last chance to stop the Obama administration from reaching a disastrous nuclear deal with Iran.

Federal Health Officer Dr. Rupert Blue, the bubonic plague virus, a view of San Francisco in 1904 and a rat caught and exterminated in the city       The Washington Times

Unwelcome as the 1900-1904 plague

If Americans suspected of carrying the Ebola virus are upset about federal and state quarantine regulations and threaten court action, it brings to mind a situation that existed in San Francisco from 1900 to 1904 when bubonic plague cases arose in the city’s Chinatown.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, campaigns for Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, left, during a rally at the University of Maryland, Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014, in College Park, Md. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Signs of a coming Republican wave

It’s almost a foregone conclusion that President Obama and the Democrats are going to suffer a humiliating defeat in next week’s midterm elections.

Illustration by TOM, Trouw, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Desperate for a deal with Iran

President Obama thinks he has succeeded in remaking America, but so far his foreign-policy legacy has been a flop.

Illustration on increasing American cultural and political support for life by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pro-life wins at the ballot box

With the recent collapse of the liberal establishment’s favorite “war on women” screed, it’s time to acknowledge a little discussed political truth: Life is a winning issue.

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Health workers wear protective gears before entering the house of a person suspected to have died of Ebola virus in Port loko Community situated on the outskirts of Freetown, Sierra Leone, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. After emerging months ago in eastern Sierra Leone, Ebola is now hitting the western edges of the country where the capital is located with dozens of people falling sick each day, the government said Tuesday. So many people are dying that removing bodies is reportedly a problem. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)

EDITORIAL: A respite from Ebola

The Ebola threat seems to have subsided, and that's cause for cautious relief. The operative word is "seems," but three weeks have passed since an unemployed Liberian man flew into the United States and infected two health care workers with the deadly virus.

Workers set up a giant advertisement for Apple's iPhone 6 which goes on sale in China, Friday, Oct 17 2014 in Beijing. China is one of Apple's largest and growing market where enthusiasts of the company's latest iPhone are willing to pay thousands of dollars to get their hands on the latest version. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

EDITORIAL: Apple and Google restrain the snoops

Obama administration officials seem to think the Constitution gives the government a license to snoop on whomever it pleases, whenever it pleases. The founding document does no such thing, of course, but Congress cannot summon the courage to restrain the executive branch.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: GOP response lacking to green-card giveaway

Ebola, the Internal Revenue Service, Benghazi, unfettered illegal immigration — the list goes on and on. While Rome burns, the politicians see no evil, hear no evil and speak not a word against the evil being foisted on the citizens of the United States by an ideologically bankrupt president and his corrupt Democratic Party ("Green cards on the table," Web, Oct. 20).

Illustration on excessive government regulation of oil by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Opening the tap for crude-oil exports

Not many years ago, the idea of "peak oil" was all the rage. The concept, first identified in 1956 by M. King Hubbert, a geologist working for Shell Oil, held that there was a finite amount of oil in the ground and that oil production would peak in the 1970s and then decline.

Shortly before mailing his own ballot, U.S. Senator Mark Udall, D-Colo., speaks inside a coffee shop on a campaign stop to remind voters to mail in their ballots, in the Five Points area of Denver, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Showing proper ID is a fact of life

If you've ever tried to board a plane, cash a check or rent a car, you've almost surely had to show some form of identification with your picture on it. Millions of Americans produce them every day to do dozens of everyday tasks and think nothing of it.

A longtime Democratic operative, Ron Klain was tasked Friday by President Barack Obama with running the government's response to the Ebola crisis. (AP Photo/Revolution)

A new, unimproved Ebola czar

- The Washington Times

Liberian health care workers have threatened to strike unless they receive higher pay for working with Ebola patients.

Rising Sea Levels Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Another EPA alarm about rising seas that aren't rising

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy visited Miami Beach recently to raise awareness about the need to "stop global warming" in order to save the region from dangerous sea-level rise.

Senate candidate Bruce Braley, right,  campaigns with  U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in an Iowa Votes rally in Des Moines  Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at the Hotel Fort Des Moines . (AP Photo/The Des Moines Register, Rodney White)  MAGS OUT, TV OUT, NO SALES, MANDATORY CREDIT

It was a dark and stormy Democratic night

- The Washington Times

This is the week the political world, like the worm, begins to turn. The polls, the hunches, the guesses and the vibes that only junkies feel all say it's a Republican year and Harry Reid will soon take a seat on the back bench.