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  • Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during a recording of nationwide TV address at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence  outside Moscow early Monday, July 21, 2014. Putin has lambasted those who use the downing of a passenger jet in eastern Ukraine for "mercenary objectives," the Kremlin said Monday. In a statement posted on the Kremlin website, Putin again lashed out at Ukraine for ongoing violence with pro-Russian rebels in the eastern part of the country. (AP Photo/RIA Novosti Kremlin, Mikhail Klimentyev, Presidential Press Service)

    BUCHANAN: A GOP ultimatum to Vlad

    By Patrick Buchanan

    With the party united, the odds are now at least even that the GOP will not only hold the House but also capture the Senate in November. But before traditional conservatives cheer that prospect, they might take a closer look at the foreign policy that a Republican Senate would seek to impose upon the nation. Published July 29, 2014 Comments

  • Family members of the victims, Jeanne Brown, left, who had a sister and father murdered, speaks during a news conference as her husband Richard Brown listens, after the nearly two hour long execution of Joseph Rudolph Wood at the state prison on Wednesday, July 23, 2014, in Florence, Ariz. (AP Photo)

    PRUDEN: When the hangman botches the job

    By Wesley Pruden - The Washington Times

    The taking of a life to punish taking a life is an idea whose time is not yet gone, but its years may be numbered. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • Gov. Paul LePage speaks at the Maine Republican Convention, Saturday, April 26, 2014, in Bangor, Maine. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    EDITORIAL: Red states are the ‘tickled pink’ states

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Where is that key to happiness? It may be down South, and voting for conservatives may be the reason why, say professors from Harvard and the Vancouver School. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, file photo, Luis Mendez, 23, left, and Maurice Mike, 23, wait in line at a job fair held by the Miami Marlins, at Marlins Park in Miami. Employers added a scant 74,000 jobs in December after averaging 214,000 in the previous four months. The Labor Department said Friday, Jan. 10, 2014, that the unemployment rate fell from 7 percent in November to 6.7 percent, its lowest level since October 2008. But the drop occurred mostly because many Americans stopped looking for jobs. Once people without jobs stop looking for one, the government no longer counts them as unemployed. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

    MORICI: The real unemployment rate is at least 18%

    By Peter Morici

    Friday, the Labor Department is expected to report the economy added 235,000 jobs in July, and the unemployment rate remained steady at 6.1 percent, but that hardly tells the story. Published July 29, 2014 Comments

  • FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2013 file photo, Washington Police Chief Cathy Lanier speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Police officials in the nations capital have been facing recent questions about headline-making arrests _ not of hardened street criminals but of their own officers. In a single month, one District of Columbia police officer was accused of taking semi-nude pictures of a 15-year-old runaway and another was charged with running a prostitution operation involving teenage girls. A third was indicted on an attempted murder charge, accused of striking his wife in the head with a light fixture. (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)

    EDITORIAL: A Second Amendment right recognized for D.C.

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Thugs in the nation’s capital might think twice now before preying on a nighttime stroller — or a stroller in midafternoon, for that matter — in the belief that the prey won’t shoot back. The good guys can now defend themselves. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • Republican Ed Gillespie, left, and Sen. Mark Warner, right, laugh after a debate at The Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., Saturday, July 26, 2014.  (AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch, Bob Brown)

    EDITORIAL: The two faces of Mark Warner

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    “Governor Warner wouldn’t recognize Senator Warner today.” That was the memorable line from the weekend debate between Virginia’s Sen. Mark R. Warner, the Democratic senior senator, and his challenger in November, Ed Gillespie. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • Illustration on questions over the role of the national archivist in the IRS scandal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

    EPSTEIN: All IRS roads lead to the archivist

    By Dan Epstein

    The Internal Revenue Service is the House of Representatives’ public enemy No. 1. The agency has quietly admitted that it has lost emails for seven employees at the center of the agency’s targeting of conservative groups, including the former employee at the heart of the scandal, Lois Lerner. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • Illustration on block grants to states for social services by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

    KEENE: Thinking outside nanny-state box with Paul Ryan

    By David Keene - The Washington Times

    Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin is perhaps the smartest conservative in Congress. Unusual for a politician, the former vice presidential nominee actually spends time thinking about problems and coming up with solutions. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • Government Overregulation of Education Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

    QUINLAN: Washington’s war on for-profit colleges

    By Andrew F. Quinlan

    In the Obama administration’s war on for-profit universities, anything apparently goes. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • FILE - In this May 30, 2014 file photo, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg answers questions during an interview at The Associated Press in Washington. While Hamburg acknowledged that opioids are overprescribed, she again emphasized the importance of keeping the drugs accessible to Americans with chronic pain _ a group estimated at about 100 million, or about 40 percent of all U.S. adults (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)

    FEULNER: The trouble with banning trans fats

    By Ed Feulner

    Like many Americans, you probably think it’s up to you to determine how healthy your diet is. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • Big Brother Putin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

    RAHN: When money mischief goes global

    By Richard Rahn

    Do you want the Obama administration sharing all of your financial information with the Russian, Chinese and Saudi Arabian governments? Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • A Palestinian child, who was injured in the war in Gaza, is prepared to be moved by ambulance from a hospital in north Sinai to Cairo after crossing the Gaza Egypt border on Saturday, in el-Arish, Egypt, early Sunday, July 27, 2014. Hamas on Sunday agreed to observe a 24-hour humanitarian truce after initially rejecting such an offer by Israel, as fighting resumed and the two sides wrangled over the terms of a lull the international community hopes can be expanded into a more sustainable truce. (AP Photo/Muhamed Sabry)

    PINSKER: Corpse PR: The Hamas handbook

    By Scott Pinsker

    Pleading with the international community to note the moral distinction between predator and prey, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu declared on FOX News Sunday: “We are using missile defense to protect our civilians, and they’re using their civilians to protect their missiles.” But chillingly, that was an understatement – and the Western media has blood on its hands. Welcome to the rise of Corpse PR. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • FILE - This March 22, 2013 file photo shows the United Auto Workers Local 174 sign outside their building in Romulus, Mich. Delegates to the United Auto Workers convention on Tuesday, June 3, 2014 voted to raise dues 25 percent to shore up the union's finances, the first increase in 47 years. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

    MALKIN: Justice for the Delphi workers

    By Michelle Malkin

    The White House pretended to champion American workers last week with gimmicky initiatives on federal job training and “workplace innovation.” But far from the Beltway dog-and-pony show, a group of American workers ruthlessly shafted by the Obama administration was finally getting some real support — and inching toward justice. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • Heart Measure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

    YOUNG & DELANEY: A safety net that works

    By Todd Young and John Delaney

    Every American can agree that too many government social programs fail citizens they are intended to serve. Published July 25, 2014 Comments

  • Texas Prosperity Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

    DAVIS: To fix America, copy Texas

    By Mark Davis

    Imagine if Democrats could point to one state that survived the economic recession better than the rest because of liberal policies. Published July 25, 2014 Comments

Recent Articles
  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Planned Parenthood ignores statutory rape

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    In response to the latest of many reports and lawsuits against Planned Parenthood for failure to report sexual abuse of children, Marie Logsden, vice president of communications at Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains, said in part: "The well-being of our patients is our highest priority." Published July 16, 2014

  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Congress, others complicit in border problem

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Does America truly have a border problem or have we become so complacent, so soft and so focused and involved with our own personal lives, that we have collectively lost our ability to care? Published July 16, 2014

  • Illustration on world decline as a consequence of American decline by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

    HANSON: When America fell apart

    By Victor Davis Hanson

    The summer of 2014 will go down in history as the season when America fell apart. Let's take a tour of the disasters. Published July 16, 2014

  • SELNICK: An action plan for VA reform

    By Darin Selnick

    The latest report describing the breakdown of performance and service at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) was unsparing. Published July 16, 2014

  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Impeachment would serve history, posterity

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    I am among those who wish to see impeachment proceedings initiated against President Obama. Published July 16, 2014

  • HARPER: Media should be more skeptical of academic work

    By Christopher Harper

    A scandal concerning academic journals that could unravel theories and practices from acoustics to climate change rattled scientists this month throughout the world. Published July 16, 2014

  • When the West is pushed, it turns right

    By Carl Graham

    Most people have heard by now that the locals out West are getting a little restless, as they have every other generation or so since the mid-19th century. Published July 16, 2014

  • Winning Western women

    By Tammy Bruce

    As a woman who moved from the left to the right, I've watched with some interest the political discussion about how conservatives can address women's issues and win our support. Published July 16, 2014

  • Ready to rumble: Ready for Warren Vs. Ready for Hillary

    By Jennifer Harper - The Washington Times

    Looks like the high profile political action committee Ready for Hillary has some company. Launched Tuesday, Ready4Warren.com is a new campaign website to support a potential presidential run by Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. Published July 16, 2014

  • The West may rise again

    By Monica Crowley - The Washington Times

    Not so long ago, the American West was fertile ground for conservative thought, action, and leadership. It was the region that remained most faithful to the nation's founding principles of personal freedom, rugged individualism, and economic freedom. It prided itself on being the nation's political frontier, a place that maintained its fiercely devoted embrace of the pioneering spirit that gave rise to America's continental expansion and ultimately, its superpower status. Published July 16, 2014

  • WILLIAMS: Big Labor's attack on tipping

    By Ryan Williams

    The practice of tipping – especially popular in the United States – has a new and formidable enemy. Inexplicable as it may seem, Big Labor has set its sights on the custom of tipping – an institution that has helped move millions of workers into the middle class. Published July 16, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'Police State USA'

    By Adam Walinsky - Special to The Washington Times

    The subtitle to this alarmingly titled book is "How Orwell's Nightmare is Becoming Our Reality." The author, a news writer for The Washington Times, offers as illustration a case in which a former Marine was arrested and forced to undergo a psychiatric evaluation on the basis of anti-government messages posted on his Facebook page. Published July 16, 2014

  • An opportunity that can't be lost

    By David Keene - The Washington Times

    After a landslide victory in 2008, Barack Obama and his political advisors vowed to not only fundamentally change America, but to lock down their victory by fundamentally changing the politics of the American West. Published July 16, 2014

  • America hasn't peaked yet

    By John Andrews

    "Contrition is BS." Press secretary Ronald Ziegler's acid tone shocked me and he didn't use the initials. It was 1973, a bad year in a bad decade for America. I was a young speechwriter in the Nixon White House, assigned to gather input from Ziegler and national security advisor Henry Kissinger for a TV address that we hoped would put the president's Watergate troubles behind him. Published July 16, 2014

  • The Tea Party and the modern-day Sagebrush Rebellion

    By Niger Innis

    The issue of land ownership in America is as old as this nation, itself. However, still, Americans in the West are forced to live in states and work on lands that the federal government greedily declares is theirs, not ours. Published July 16, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Missouri aims to stop the snoops

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    The Founding Fathers were without peer in the eloquence and power of words. For more than two centuries, their ideas have shown the way to build a free and prosperous nation. It's a sign of our splintered times that some Americans feel it necessary to bring timeless language "up to date." Published July 15, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Far-left N.Y. Democrats go hunting for DINOs

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York City walks a few steps to the left of Karl Marx, but that's not enough for some of the daffy Democrats in Gotham. Published July 15, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Obama AWOL as border crisis worsens

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    John McCain, an immigration hawk. Who knew? Published July 15, 2014

  • CARSON: Literacy cultivates a curious mind

    By Ben S. Carson

    I recently returned home after two weeks of engagements in New Zealand and Australia focusing on empowerment through reading. Published July 15, 2014

  • MALLOY: What IRS scandal? Holder's Justice Department investigates parade float

    By Fingers Malloy

    It's good to see the Department of Justice tackling the tough issues. The Justice Department, notorious for its speed and eternal vigilance when it comes to policing the lawlessness of the Obama Administration, is investigating a controversial parade float critical of the president less than two weeks after its debut in a Fourth of July celebration in the small town of Norfolk, Nebraska. The parade float featured a zombie-like mannequin wearing overalls, standing outside of an outhouse labeled "Obama Presidential Library." Published July 15, 2014

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