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Illustration on excessive government regulation of oil by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Opening the tap for crude-oil exports

Not many years ago, the idea of “peak oil” was all the rage. The concept, first identified in 1956 by M. King Hubbert, a geologist working for Shell Oil, held that there was a finite amount of oil in the ground and that oil production would peak in the 1970s and then decline.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

D.C. charter schools deserve equal funding

As Washington gets ready to select a new mayor, D.C. voters should insist that to get their vote, a candidate should pledge to provide all students in the District equitable treatment when it comes to school funding.

Illustration on Ron Klain by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Treating Ebola with politics

When the then-spreading Ebola virus threatened our nation last week, President Obama put one man in charge of coordinating the government’s response who had zero experience in handling infectious diseases.

Illustration on free trade and government restrictions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Free-trade superstitions

What’s it like being a free-market advocate in the 21st century? I think it can be summarized as follows: Another day, another dollar — and another attack on capitalism.

Pope Francis waves as he leaves after he celebrated the beatification ceremony of Pope Paul VI, and a mass for the closing of of a two-week synod on family issues, in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican,  Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

The price of papal popularity

Normally a synod of Catholic bishops does not provide fireworks rivaling the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, where Mayor Richard Daley’s boys in blue ran up the score on the radicals in Grant Park.

Seal of the Just Us Department Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A post-Holder Justice Department worthy of the name

Watergate-era misconduct and politicization at the Department of Justice shattered public trust in a once-venerated institution by 1975. The urgent task of restoring Justice fell to Edward H. Levi.

Senate candidate Bruce Braley, right,  campaigns with  U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in an Iowa Votes rally in Des Moines  Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at the Hotel Fort Des Moines . (AP Photo/The Des Moines Register, Rodney White)  MAGS OUT, TV OUT, NO SALES, MANDATORY CREDIT

It was a dark and stormy Democratic night

- The Washington Times

This is the week the political world, like the worm, begins to turn. The polls, the hunches, the guesses and the vibes that only junkies feel all say it’s a Republican year and Harry Reid will soon take a seat on the back bench.

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Illustration on California's sexual assent law by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Gone is the girl who can't say 'no'

Gay blades, weary of the indulgent life of easy gratification, want the courts to guarantee their right to marry. Stuffy straights demand that politicians legislate their partner's sexual intentions. The times, they are indeed a-changin'.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Not Guilty'

The single best general account of the prosecution of Sen. Ted Stevens, as seen within the context of the extraordinary history of contemporary Alaska in the age of oil, is "Crude Awakening: Money, Mavericks, and Mayhem in Alaska," a book co-authored by Amanda Coyne and Tony Hopfinger.

Mao Zedong

EDITORIAL: The benefits of inequality

Income inequality between the world's rich and poor has grown to levels not seen since the 1820s, says the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Paris-based association of 34 of the wealthiest nations produced a report that's stoking the fire in the bellies of liberals who decry the state of affairs and demand renewed attempts to redistribute the wealth.

Government Control of Medicine Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Lessons from Ebola

While the federal government and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Director Tom Frieden are telling us how safe we are from Ebola and sending 4,000 American troops to help Liberia combat the virus, Americans might want to look at how our federally supervised system is performing on the ground here.

Sen. Ted Cruz, Texas Republican, called the court's decision not to take on any gay marriage cases"tragic" and vowed to take action. (associated press)

EDITORIAL: The gay-marriage conundrum

A man who imagined himself quite the wit once posed a riddle to Abraham Lincoln: "If you count a dog's tail as a leg, how many legs does a dog have?" Just four, the president replied. "You can call a tail a leg, but it's not a leg."

Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune, left, and Teressa Celia, Associate Director of Infection Prevention and Control, pose in protective suits in an isolation room, in the Emergency Room of the hospital, during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014. The U.S. government plans to begin taking the temperatures of travelers from West Africa arriving at five U.S. airports, including the New York area's JFK International and Newark Liberty International, as part of a stepped-up response to the Ebola epidemic. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

EDITORIAL: Close the borders to Ebola

The Obama administration is certain that the president and all his men know more about everything than just about anyone else. They see no point in listening to anyone outside the comfortable confines of the White House bunker.