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Illustration on the truth about gun control by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Why gun control is a loser for the Democrats

There is nothing so comforting as a closely held prejudice, even when it repeatedly harms you. The white-hot passion of Democratic politicians to restrict and even strip Americans of their constitutionally guaranteed right to buy, own, keep, shoot and carry firearms continues as a monument to self-abuse.

U.N. Policies on Global Warming Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The politics behind the anti-fossil fuels campaign

History shows Earth’s climate goes through cycles, long and short, tied to a variety of natural factors. In the latter part of the 20th century, some scientists began to wonder about the causes of a modest warming, then cooling, then warming, which had been occurring since the mid-1800s. They also began to worry about the possible implications of continued warming.

After a speech at the Illinois State Capitol, President Barack Obama stops at the Hoogland Center for the Arts in Springfield, Ill.(Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune via AP)

Obama is no incompetent

While he was mocked for his performance in the last debate and had a disappointing showing in New Hampshire, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said what none of his rivals are willing to admit: “Let’s dispel [sic] with the fiction that Barack Obama doesn’t know what he’s doing. He knows exactly what he’s doing. He is trying to change this country” — with astonishing success.

Illustration on unconventional war by Linas Garsys/The Washington Tmes

Winning an unconventional war

War is — and always will be — hell. The Law of Armed Conflict is not meant to change that — only to make it a little less hellish. There are weapons you agree not to use. In exchange, your enemy doesn’t use those weapons against you. You treat captured combatants humanely. You expect the same when your soldiers are taken prisoner.

Draining Military Morale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The military’s malaise

There’s a cloud of malaise worthy of Jimmy Carter that has settled over the nation’s military. The man who should be able to clear away the cloud, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, won’t be able to do anything about it.

This image provided buy the Library of Congress shows an artists rendering of the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. (Associated Press)

Historical loops of presidents and wars

This Presidents Day, when we commemorate the past and present leaders of this country, it’s also a time for Americans to reconsider the patterns of American power through our history and consider where they want the pattern to continue as we get ready to elect a new leader into office.

Illustration on the mediocre U.S. economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

An economy mired in mediocrity

For seven years, President Obama’s economic recovery has been all “faux” and no “go.” The one thing America elected him to do in 2008 — restore the economy — still remains effectively undone as growth continues to be lackluster. It has become clear that when it comes to America’s economy, he takes a uniquely fatalistic approach to its performance.

Illustration on the relationship between Hillary Clinton and Goldman Sachs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pinned to Wall Street

When Goldman Sachs, the powerful, multibillion-dollar Wall Street investment bank, offered Hillary Clinton $675,000 for three speeches, she readily accepted.

Spiro Agnew Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Spiro Agnew shaped Republican rhetoric

Spiro Agnew today is what he characterized himself as in 1968. Richard Nixon tapped the unknown governor of Maryland to be his Republican vice presidential running mate: “not exactly a household word.”

Duplicitous attacks on the Maldives

It is a compelling tale. A longtime political activist leads his party to victory in a closely fought election in a country famed for its pristine archipelagos and on the front of the war against climate change. There is no doubt that Mohamed Nasheed, the former president of the Maldives, was adept at using the international media to promote his agenda while in government.

A student teacher in the second-grade classroom of teacher Susanne Diaz at Marcus Whitman Elementary School, goes over lessons with students, in Richland, Wash. (Ty Beaver/The Tri-City Herald via AP)

Let no child be left unconfused

- The Washington Times

Mae West, the famous philosopher of the boudoir, would hardly believe her fortune today. “So many men,” she once complained, “so little time.” She was the kind of girl who set out to “climb the ladder of success, wrong by wrong.”

Illustrations on Christians and Yazidis in Syria and Iraq by Lians Garsys/The Washington Times

Forsaken for their faith

It’s now a couple of weeks of news cycles since we learned from satellite imagery that the Islamic State had destroyed the monastery of St. Elijah, which for more than 11 centuries served as a spiritual oasis for the promulgation of Christianity in the Middle East.

Cost of Ethanol on the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Renewable Fuel Standard deceit

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants Americans to pay more for their groceries. That’s the only way to explain the agency’s decision to mandate the use of corn-based ethanol in our gas supply.

Changing Campaign Financing Rules Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

An alternative to nonstop political fundraising

America’s campaign finance laws are often a convenient scapegoat for all of our country’s ills. Witness Democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders invoking campaign spending in response to seemingly every other debate question.

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BOOK REVIEW: 'Red Team: How to Succeed by Thinking Like the Enemy'

RED TEAM: HOW TO SUCCEED BY THINKING LIKE THE As author Micah Zenko points out, the concept of red teaming started out with an effort by the Roman Catholic Church in the 13th century to thoroughly investigate candidates for sainthood and debunk false claims; the clergymen who held this title were informally called "Devil's Advocates."

Illustration on Michael Bloomberg's real identity as a Democrat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An independent hat in the presidential ring?

Recent news reports indicate that former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is considering an independent run for the White House and is likely to make a decision in the next month in order to ensure that his name is placed on the ballots of all 50 states.

All lives matter

Every January we are reminded of just how cruel a nation we really are. The annual March for Life in Washington magnifies the legal torture our nation allows on innocent, unborn babies growing in their mothers' wombs.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Dordt College, on Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Sioux Center, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

'Politics ain't beanbag'

It was back in 1895 that Finley Peter Dunne's fictional Mr. Dooley first observed that "politics ain't beanbag," but nothing has happened since to throw doubt on Dooley's words. In fact, this year's Republican presidential campaign sounds a lot like something Mr. Dooley would have truly enjoyed.

President Barack Obama speaks in Detroit. During an interview with Politico posted on its website Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, Obama was extremely cautious in discussing the presidential campaign to avoid showing explicit favor in the Democratic race. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

Unsustainable overspending

Compound interest, so the saying goes, is the most powerful force in the universe. It can turn a meager investment into a rich treasure with the passage of time. It can also transform manageable debt into a crushing financial burden that can never be repaid. Sadly, that could be the fate of the United States due to persistent overspending, according to the Congressional Budget Office's (CBO) Summary of the Budget and Economic Outlook.

Trump's fool's gold

A half-century of conservative dedication to the GOP is being threatened by a Rockefeller Republican, all the way down to the man's recently spouted views, inherited wealth and bad manners. Far too many putative leaders have been seduced by the populist siren song of raw appeal. Donald Trump has filled a leaderless vacuum — but at the cost of abandoning principle.

TRUMP Poster Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Not Trump

When the publisher of National Review, Jack Fowler, called and asked me to write 300 words on why I oppose Donald Trump for president of the United States, my first thought was about the derision that was sure to come from Trump supporters.

Illustration on the history of human suffering under socialism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Socialism means coercion

Do you know what socialism is? Hillary Clinton struggled to find an answer when recently asked. Socialism is a system in which the government owns or controls the means of production, and allocates resources and rewards.

In search of solutions

Whether you're liberal or conservative, it's usually easy to say what you oppose. Both sides spend a good deal of time trying to shoot down policies from the other side. But do you know what you favor?

This Sept. 19, 2013, photo, shows the sign of a Wal-Mart store in San Jose, Calif. A National Labor Relations Board judge says Wal-Mart Stores Inc. unlawfully disciplined workers who staged protests in May and June of 2013 and ordered the retailer to reinstate 16 former employees, as well as give them back pay. The decision, posted on the labor board’s website late Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, arrived one day after the nation’s largest private employer said it was giving raises to most of its hourly employees. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Breaking the business model

Wal-Mart announced this month that it is closing 154 stores in the country, the biggest retrenchment in its history. The retail giant, whose earnings have come under pressure in recent years, also revealed that it is scrapping plans to open two new supercenters in Washington D.C.'s poorest neighborhoods.

Ben & Jerry's co-founder Ben Cohen has created a new ice cream flavor to honor Sen. Bernie Sanders. (Ben Cohen) ** FILE **

Ben & Jerry's co-founder creates ice cream flavor to honor Bernie Sanders: 'Bernie's Yearning'

- The Washington Times

They were there when Sen. Bernie Sanders announced his candidacy for president last year. And they're back to campaign for the Democratic hopeful in their own style. Ben & Jerry's ice cream founders Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield have gone to Iowa to talk up the 74-year-old, self-described socialist among voters at multiple events. Mr Cohen in particular took it upon himself to make an extremely limited edition ice cream flavor after the candidate - "Bernie's Yearning."

Immigrants from El Salvador and Guatemala who entered the country illegally board a bus after they were released from a family detention center in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

When foreigners bring disease across the border

When facing the massive problems associated with an open border, deluges of illegal immigration, and now even government sponsored surges of so-called "refugees," we naturally must discuss our concern about terrorism and violent crime. That, however, is only part of the threat.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Fault Lines'

It does not surprise me that the British author David Pryce-Jones titled his amazing memoir as he did. To him, his long life (he will turn 80 in February), has involved a series of attempts to bridge the contradictions in his heritage and in the eclectic consistently admirable distinctive career he has pursued as novelist, biographer and journalist.

Illustration of Forrest McDonald by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Remembering Forrest McDonald

- The Washington Times

Forrest McDonald, perhaps the greatest student of the American founding, passed away late last week at the age of 89. His scholarship and work have had more impact on the understanding of the intellectual and historical context that produced the Constitution and the creation of the United States than most people appreciate.

Flawed polling in 2016 race?

Pundits across the political spectrum have expressed bewilderment at the 2016 presidential race. The entire campaign seems to have slipped down the rabbit hole to some surreal political wonderland. Inevitable winners are losing. Hillary Rodham Clinton is suddenly not liberal enough and Jeb Bush is too liberal. The feminist candidate is being called a woman basher.

Former Attorney General Eric Holder pauses as he speaks at the Justice Department in Washington to discuss the Aug. 9, 2014, shooting in Ferguson, Mo. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

A racket in the chicken house

Some of the chickens of Eric Holder, the former attorney general, and President Obama are fluttering over the chicken house again, looking for the roost. One of those chickens, as persistent as a tough old Dominecker hen, is the Holder scheme called "Fast & Furious."