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Obama’s futile overtures to Cuba

President Obama’s argument for unilaterally reversing U.S.-Cuba policy rests on the false premise that engagement with dictators and terrorists will somehow get them to change their ways.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton has a laugh in Boston in this Dec. 4, 2014, file photo. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

Hillary Clinton’s jaded sense of justice

The Benghazi massacre most certainly deserves to be a subject Hillary Rodham Clinton should be held accountable for and never allowed to forget. Yet there is another, even more recklessly dangerous thing that will affect Mrs. Clinton’s designs on the White House: her attitude in general toward America’s enemies.

Illustration on Obama's new policy toward Cuba by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Koch brothers bad, Castro brothers Boy Scouts

Liberals were in a near euphoric state on Wednesday after President Obama announced that the United States and Cuba are on a path to normalizing relations between the two nations, a move that will pave the way for a U.S. Embassy in Havana, and may eventually lead to lifting a 50-year-old American trade embargo.

In this Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014, photo, American flags fly in front of the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) ** FILE **

Recalling what is right about America

Everywhere, we suddenly hear words of division, difference, recrimination. Suddenly, America is Ferguson, Missouri writ large. But are we? Are we not still Americans, first?

Illustration on the damage being done by Obamacare by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Obamacare’s Christmas surprise

Get ready for the largely underreported rule that will allow CMS to change Americans’ health plans without their knowledge.

In this Dec. 17, 2014, file photo, a poster for the movie "The Interview" is carried away by a worker after being pulled from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Hollywood cowers at this laff riot over ‘The Interview’

- The Washington Times

Movies may not be better than ever, as a Hollywood marketing slogan in yesteryear boasted they were, but the critics take movies seriously in North Korea. The chief movie critic in Pyongyang can kill a movie with a single review. He might even kill anybody who goes to see it.

Illustration on steps needed to protect U.S. intellectual property by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lessons from the Sony hack attack

The hacking attack of Sony Corp. and the compromising of its intellectual property should send a wake-up call to American business. If Sony can be hacked, so too can our companies that make defense technologies. This attack reveals that the very innovations that give us our competitive edge in the world, both commercially and strategically, are gravely at risk.

Illustration on continued access to Juvenile criminal records by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Allowing access to juveniles’ records hurts their chances of going straight

By incapacitating violent and dangerous offenders, incarceration can promote public safety. But a point of diminishing returns is reached as prisons sweep in more and more nonviolent, low-risk offenders. These circumstances are even more alarming when you look at the juvenile justice system and consider that 95 percent of youths in this system have committed nonviolent offenses, including some that weren’t even a crime when many of us were kids.

Illustration on Obama's normalization policy towards Cuba by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama adds Cuba to his list of sellouts

President Obama continues to embrace low-tier, go-it-alone executive actions to pad the last two years of his mistake-filled, empty-agenda presidency in a hopeless hunt for a legacy. His arrogant decision this week to re-establish diplomatic relations with communist Cuba is the latest example of a president desperately searching for something do without having to deal with Congress.

Illustration on the need to identify Islamic terrorism for what it is by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Suicide by political correctness

- The Washington Times

During its coverage of this week’s Islamic terrorist attack in Sydney, Australia, CNN ran a telling banner: “Motivation of suspect unknown.” Motivation unknown? Really?

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Illustration on the political damage to Democrats from Obama by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Democrats on the critical list

The Democrats, who were in serious condition after being battered, bloodied and beaten in the midterm elections, are now on the critical list.

New government regulations just announced will require anyone who sells food to the public to count their customers' calories. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)

Government calorie-counting

The lot of the nannies at the Food and Drug Administration is not a happy one. They just can't get everyone to eat their spinach. The stubborn rubes out there in flyover land want to decide for themselves what to eat. But the new government regulations just announced will require anyone who sells food to the public to count their customers' calories.

A recent cover from The New Republic

Media in rocky transition: 30 New Republic editors resign, next issue cancelled

- The Washington Times

There have been rumors of change and differences of philosophy for a month. Multiple news sources now report that Franklin Foer has resigned as editor of The New Republic on Thursday afternoon, to be replaced by Gabriel Snyder, a digital guru at Bloomberg Media who formerly worked for The Atlantic Wire and Gawker. Some reports frame the event as an "editorial shakeup" in the immediate aftermath.

Medicaid SGR Caduceus Screw Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to reform Medicare

Every year, Medicare physician payment rates spark a legislative fire drill. The complex formula for updating doctors' reimbursements, the sustainable growth rate formula, routinely threatens Medicare physicians with draconian payment cuts. Next year, the formula mandates a 21 percent pay cut.

FILE - In this May 21, 2014 file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, is greeted by Chinese President Xi Jinping before the opening ceremony at the fourth Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia (CICA) summit in Shanghai, China. Angry with the West's response over Ukraine, Russia is moving rapidly to bolster ties with North Korea in a diplomatic nose-thumbing that could complicate the U.S.-led effort to squeeze Pyongyang into giving up its nuclear weapons program. Russia's proactive strategy in Asia- which also involves cozying up to China and had been dubbed "Putin's Pivot" - began years ago as Moscow's answer to Washington's much touted rebalancing of its military forces in the Pacific. (AP Photo/Mark Ralston, Pool, File)

Second Sino-Russian alliance shatters illusions

President Obama began his administration in 2009 believing that American restraint would encourage great-power comity and cooperation. While he may now realize that such hope was illusory, what he may not grasp is that American strategic weakness resulting from his restraint has only encouraged a gathering Second Sino-Russian alliance.

East High School students participate in a protest against the Ferguson, Missouri grand jury decision, at a busy intersection in front of the state Capitol in Denver, Wednesday Dec. 3, 2014. Authorities said four Denver police officers were hit by a car while watching the high school students protest.  (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

More lunacy on the left

Dedicated party-line liberals — "progressives," they call themselves now that they realize they polluted the noble word "liberal" — look at the world differently than most people. They recognize the sins of their own country and see them as just as bad as the sins of other countries, however vile, and probably worse. It's this skewed vision that enables professors and their students to go from a gay rights rally exorcising the "homophobia" of Christians to a rally praising Muslim jihadis for whom homosexuality is a capital offense. For them, there's only a little difference, if any, in the values of the West and those of the patriots of the Islamic State. A crucifix or a beheading knife: What's the difference?

Marchers with a group called Backbonecampaign.org from Vashon, Washington, march along 6th Ave. during the People's Climate March in New York Sunday, Sept. 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

Climate activists offer to help out Ferguson protestors

- The Washington Times

Other activists have been watching the unfolding events in Ferguson and elsewhere. That includes the same organization behind the massive, gaudy, drum-thumping People’s Climate March that drew 400,000 protestors to the streets of New York in September, and in 150 cities overseas. The group did not disband after their big event, which included celebrities and Democratic lawmakers among its marchers. They want to repeat their performance in the near future, and perhaps offer their street theater and resources to Ferguson-inspired protestors.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Remembering Barry's contributions

In recalling the long and storied political career of late D.C. Mayor Marion Barry, nearly every obituary and news account has noted that he owed his political fortunes to the District's poorest constituents. The implication is that he was the beneficiary of blind loyalty from those too unsophisticated to grasp the gravity of his personal troubles.

American Dunce Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A nation of the ignorant

Are we becoming a nation of numbskulls? If recent surveys, both formal and informal, are any indication, it's a real possibility. For example:

Illustration on the American Christmas tradition by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ignoring the Christmas haters

Alas, it is over. I am speaking of the Thanksgiving Day celebration — one of my favorite holidays. It is a serious celebration as we give thanks for our many blessings. Yet it is also a jolly day, full of good food, drink and sport, perhaps touch football, more likely a televised game. The whole family comes together and, often in the company of friends, has a festive time. Moreover, there is a venerable sense of tradition to the feast that renders the whole holiday somehow reassuring.

Clancy Testimony on Broken Secret Service Agency Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More effective protection for the president

By Dec. 15, a blue-ribbon panel is slated to recommend a new Secret Service director to the secretary of Homeland Security. If the panel has any doubt that an outside director is needed to reform the agency, it need look no further than the recent congressional testimony of Acting Secret Service Director Joseph P. Clancy.

A hero with a few missing parts

Directly north of the White House stands Lafayette Square, named in 1824 to honor the then-elderly Marquis de Lafayette, who embarked on a triumphal return tour of the United States the same year.