Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

The Internal Revenue Service Headquarters (IRS) building is seen in Washington on April 13, 2014. Unscrupulous tax preparers are using President Obama's health care law as a ploy to pocket bogus fines from unsuspecting taxpayers, including some immigrants not bound by the law's requirements, the IRS warned March 13, 2015. (Associated Press)

Ax the income tax

The most efficient solution would junk income taxes altogether in favor of a simple national sales tax.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, waves to members of the audience before speaking at an event hosted by the Center for American Progress (CAP) and the America Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), Monday, March 23, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

They’re ready for Hillary, but is Hillary ready?

- The Washington Times

The Syndicate convened the Bilderberg Group, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Illuminati and the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy over the weekend at a secret hideaway in downtown Shangri-la to talk about themes for the 2016 campaign.

Trust but verify illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When even ‘trust but verify’ won’t do

If the United States cannot verify that Iran isn’t developing nuclear weapons, then President Obama swears he won’t strike a deal with Tehran. This week, though, he seems hell-bent on doing precisely that, despite lingering questions about Iranian cheating. It is enough to drive a good man to distraction. Former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton even argued in an editorial last week that we should bomb Iran ourselves before the Israelis beat us to the punch.

Illustration on the death of Terri Schiavo by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terri Schiavo’s inconvenient life

I spent the night of March 30, 2005, in a Florida hospice. I was at the bedside of Terri Schiavo during the last 14 hours of her earthly life, right up until five minutes before her death. During that time with Terri, joined by her brother and sister, I told Terri over and over that she had many friends around the country, many people who were praying for her and were on her side. I told her the same thing during my visits to her in the months before her feeding tube was removed. I am convinced she understood.

Lifting the covers on ‘Obamoogle’

During this past week as we’ve been swamped with bad news pouring out of every corner of the globe, it wouldn’t be surprising if you missed one of the more shocking revelations about White House actions that would make even Richard Nixon blush.

Chart to accompany Moore article March 30, 2015

Not hard at work but hardly working

The great conundrum of the U.S. economy today is that we have record numbers of working-age Americans out of the labor force at the same time we have businesses desperately trying to find workers. For example, the American Transportation Research Institute estimates there are about 35,000 trucker jobs that could be filled tomorrow if workers would take these jobs — a shortage that could rise to 240,000 by 2022.

Phasing out renewable energy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pulling the plug on renewable energy

There is never a good time for bad public policy. For few policies is this more evident than renewable energy mandates (REM), variously known as renewable portfolio standards, alternative energy standards and renewable energy standards.

Illustration on Putin's designs on eastern Europe BY Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Russia’s grab for its neighbors

A bipartisan consensus is emerging that the United States should do more to address Russia’s continuing aggression against Ukraine. But Russian revanchism does not begin or end with Ukraine, nor are “little green men” its only foreign policy instrument. Moscow is actively engaged in subversive activities along Europe’s eastern flank, targeting the region’s economic and political stability. As Central European capitals grow increasingly concerned, Washington urgently needs to demonstrate its robust commitment not just to the region’s security but to its democratic future.

Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, wearing an army uniform, ride on an armed truck to patrol the international airport in Sanaa, Yemen, Saturday, March 28, 2015. Yemen's President Abed Raboo Mansour Hadi, speaking at an Arab summit in Egypt on Saturday, called Shiite rebels who forced him to flee the country "puppets of Iran," directly blaming the Islamic Republic for the chaos there and demanding airstrikes against rebel positions continue until they surrender. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Why Yemen matters

Thoughts on the shifting dynamics in the Middle East.

President Barack Obama speaks about payday lending and the economy, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at Lawson State Community College in Birmingham, Ala.  (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Barack Obama’s love bomb offensive

- The Washington Times

President Obama says Rudy Giuliani was wrong. He does, too, love America. That’s good enough for me. He says he’s a Christian, despite his constant love bombs for Islam, and if that’s good enough for God it’s good enough for me, too. Conversations between believers and the Almighty are confidential, and have yet to be cracked by the National Security Agency (but we can be sure they’re working on it).

Obamacare in a death spiral illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obamacare flying machine begins a death spiral

The Supreme Court decision in King v. Burwell, the case challenging the Obama administration’s decision to award tax credits for health insurance sold through federally established exchanges, could turn on the question of whether a ruling that ends the tax credits on federal exchanges might cause something known as a “death spiral” in health insurance markets.

Warren’s pitchfork brigade skewers the facts

Ted Cruz’s announcement this week that he’s running for president has officially kicked off the 2016 primary season and has put the pressure on other potential GOP candidates to declare. On the Democratic side of the scrum there is Elizabeth Warren, whom progressives hope is the candidate-in-waiting to lead their pitchfork brigade against the “1 percent.” While it’s still unclear whether Mrs. Warren will announce, it’s assured that her income inequality position will drive a major plank in the eventual Democratic nominee’s platform.

Related Articles

This image made from video provided by NASA shows part of the International Space Station with the Earth in the background on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. (AP Photo/NASA)

The myth of ‘settled science’

National Geographic's latest cover story has generated lots of attention because it sneers at those close-minded Americans — mostly conservatives, of course — who do not accept scientific "facts." Only 40 percent of Americans (according to Pew Research Center) "accept that human activity is the dominant cause of global warming," and the magazine finds it "dispiriting" that so many "reasonable people doubt science."

Slowing the nuclear clock Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The letter of our discontent

As our republic reels under the Obama administration's lawlessness, it's heartening to see the Republican-led Congress show some backbone — at least in foreign policy. OK, with the glaring exception of illegal immigration.

Illustration on Russian inroads to the Middle East by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Russia flexes its muscle in the Middle East

Russia is in domestic turmoil. The ruble has had a 35 percent drop in value. Population numbers have tumbled from 250 million to 140 million. Life expectancy rates are among the lowest in the world. Alcoholism is rampant. A general state of unease is ubiquitous.

EPA attack on America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The costliest EPA rule yet

A new proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency has already forced four major industrial projects worth $7 billion in new investment in the Baton Rouge area to be put on hold or redirected elsewhere. These potential investments would have collectively contributed $86 million in wages annually to the local economy and created 2,000 jobs.

You borrowed it, you repay it

The theme for the first Bill Clinton presidential campaign in 1992 was Fleetwood Mac's "Don't Stop (Thinking About Tomorrow)." It is a song that would be anathema to the Obama administration, whose fiscal policy is one which espouses living for the present without a thought about tomorrow.

A Netanyahu-Herzog coalition for Israel

In Israel's election March 17, the two contenders for prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu and Isaac Herzog, have one thing in common: Both are admirers of Winston Churchill.

Revisiting their Waterloo

As Napoleon Bonaparte's troops assembled for battle outside the Belgian village of Waterloo in June 1815, the deposed French emperor spoke scornfully of the opposing British commander and his soldiers: "I tell you that [the Duke of] Wellington is a bad general and the English are bad troops. The whole affair will be no more serious than swallowing one's breakfast!"

FILE - This Nov. 11, 2014, file photo shows the U.S. Capitol Building illuminated by the setting sun on the National Mall in Washington. When the leaders of the U.S. Olympic Committee meet Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, they'll be deciding on more than a city to put in the running to host the 2024 Summer Games. They'll be picking a partner that will help shape their near- and long-term future.  Leaders from Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington made their presentations last month and will not be present while the 15 USOC board members debate the pros and cons of each offering at their meeting at Denver International Airport. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Treason in the U.S. Senate

Sometimes public opinion must submit to a history lesson. The famous letter to Iran, signed by 47 senators, urging the mullahs in Tehran to beware of making a deal with President Obama to restrain their pursuit of the Islamic bomb, has got some Democrats in a proper tizzy over the Logan Act. These Democrats don't appear to know any more about the Logan Act than the rest of the anvil chorus, but they want the senators prosecuted for treason. They have collected 165,000 names on a petition to Mr. Obama urging him to prosecute someone.

The pronoun police

Universities are citadels of free thought, places where intellectual inquiry flourishes in an atmosphere of tolerance. Well, that's what they're supposed to be. But many administrators, professors, and, with increasing frequency, students themselves have turned many universities into institutions of indoctrination: Free thinking for me, but not for you.

** FILE ** Former U.N. Ambassador John R. Bolton (Associated Press)

John Bolton back in action, endorsing three 'national security' candidates

- The Washington Times

The man who endorsed 87 "national security" candidates and donated close to $500,000 during the 2014 midterms is back in action. Former United Nations ambassador John Bolton announced Thursday that he was backing Sen. David Vitter of Louisiana in his gubernatorial quest in the state; Rep. Ron DeSantis, the incumbent Congressman from Florida's 6th district, and Dr. Paul Chabot, candidate for Congress in California's 31st district.

Martin O'Malley (Associated Press)

Trifling with the iron rule of politics

- The Washington Times

Conventional wisdom teaches that nothing succeeds like success, but the unwary politician forgets the more important Pruden Rule, which reflects both politics and life: "Nothing recedes like success." Conventional wisdom is made of two parts gossamer and one part each of fog and smoke. The Pruden Rule is cast iron.

Just-cut stacks of $100 bills make their way down the production line at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing's Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Billionaires? The world has 1,826 of them - and 541 live in America

- The Washington Times

There’s lots of billionaires out there — 1,826, to be exact, according to recent painstaking research of Forbes magazine. Mote than a third prefer the urbane and urban life, and the Big Apple is the town of choice. The publication says that with 78 resident billionaires, New York City has the largest uber-rich population on the planet. But wait, there’s more.

A Secret Service officer and Secret Service agents provide security as Marine One carries President Barack Obama off the South Lawn of the White House, on Thursday, March 12, 2015, in Washington. Obama to traveling to Los Angeles for an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live, and a DNC fundraiser. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

No time for ‘boys will be boys’

The days of the Secret Service agent as superhero are long gone. Instead of men like Clint Hill flying into the back seat of the Kennedy motorcade to protect the first lady after the assassination in Dallas, or of the stoic agents of a later time who surrounded Ronald Reagan with their bodies and got him to safety after John Hinckley's failed assassination attempt, the men of today's security detail appear to be rude, raucous, unfocused college frat boys.

Left back by class warfare

Three recent developments should have had President Obama and liberals everywhere grinding their teeth.

In this image made from video posted on a social media account affiliated with the Islamic State group on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, militants take sledgehammers to an ancient artifact in the Ninevah Museum in Mosul, Iraq. The extremist group has destroyed a number of shrines --including Muslim holy sites -- in order to eliminate what it views as heresy. The militants are also believed to have sold ancient artifacts on the black market in order to finance their bloody campaign across the region. (AP Photo via militant social media account)

Destruction in civilization’s cradle

Trashing antiquities and traces of early civilization is so easy a caveman can do it. Steeped in ruinous belief, the cavemen of the Islamic State are adding to their criminal rampage across the Middle East, smashing and looting the priceless artifacts made by their ancestors in a more constructive era.

A Likely Exhibit at the Obama Presidential Library Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A presidential library for Obama's fairy tales

Sometime this month, the Barack Obama Foundation will likely announce the specific site of the president's library. It's expected to be in Chicago, but that's not the big news. Rather, the 14th presidential library, like the 44th occupant of the White House, will probably be the most controversial because it will stray so far from the aims of the original one begun by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939. At that time, FDR donated his personal and presidential papers to the federal government, even pledging part of his estate in Hyde Park, New York, for the site.