Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

(Associated Press) ** FILE **

The land of the cheerful giver

The Lord loveth a cheerful giver, as the Apostle Paul tells us, and some of the most generous givers are the most cheerful among the faithful, and they live among us in America.

Scimitar canary illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Islamic jihad comes to campus

The world is witnessing a resurgence of global anti-Semitism not seen since the 1930s and the “Final Solution.” In the Middle East, Hitler-admiring regimes like Iran, and Hitler-admiring parties like Hezbollah, Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, are openly planning to finish the job the Nazis started. Even in America, until now the most hospitable place outside of Israel for Jews, the atmosphere is more hostile than at any time in the last 70 years.

Illustration on the history of successful presidents passing a "third term" to their political successors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The odds against a presidential three-peat

Republicans looking ahead to 2016 take heart: History is on your side. For more than a century, only twice has a party held the White House for at least three consecutive presidential elections. Both times, it took each party’s greatest president of this period — Franklin Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan — to accomplished the feat. That fact should be a major concern to Democrats, who will be seeking their party’s third consecutive term on President Obama’s record.

Union attempts to organize fast food illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The $50 million question

Facing what appears to be terminal decline, the Service Employees International Union has taken to a desperate Hail Mary play to keep their bank accounts well-funded. This week SEIU and its “worker center” front groups, led by Berlin Rosen — a political consultancy with ties to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and other left-wing groups — staged various media stunts claiming to be “strikes” against fast food restaurants for higher wages.

Protecting the U.S. electrical grid illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting America in the dark

The recent temporary blackout in Washington that afflicted the White House, the Congress and interrupted a State Department press conference rightly provoked a spate of media commentary about the vulnerability of the electric grid to terrorist attack. The blackout reportedly was caused by a small explosion resulting from a malfunction in a transformer substation.

Illustration on the packaging of Hillary Clinton's candidacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The selling of the new Hillary

Joe McGinnis, a young writer who got access to the advertising agency with the Nixon account in 1968, changed the way we thought about electing presidents with his best-seller, “The Selling of the President.”

Illustration on restoring the American dream by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The exceptional thing the successful GOP candidate must say

The successful Republican candidate for president will have to be many things: fearless fighter, relentless advocate for conservative principles, articulate spokesperson for the forgotten middle class, a likable charismatic personality, expert on the complicated dynamics of foreign policy and national security strategy.

Ethnicity mask illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The transracial nation

Not long ago, The New York Times uncovered the artifact that Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush had once listed himself as “Hispanic” on a Florida voter registration form.

Illustration on Obama's killing of Americans without due process by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Can the president kill Americans?

Can the president kill you? The short answer is: yes, but not legally. Yet, President Obama has established a secret process that involves officials from the departments of Justice and Defense, the CIA, and the White House senior staff whereby candidates are proposed for execution, and the collective wisdom of the officials then recommends execution to the president, who then accepts or rejects the recommendation.

Republicans breaking campaign promises illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The wimpy GOP Congress

Last November, Americans sent a stern message to President Obama and the Democrats when they delivered Congress to the Republicans. That’s because Republicans made a lot of promises to them in the last election. Those commitments were instrumental to their victory; they were actions Americans were demanding and Republicans were vowing to deliver.

Related Articles

Obama's gift to Iran

President Obama and his crooked-shooting sidekick, Secretary of State John Kerry, are desperate for an agreement with Iran, placing some meaningless restrictions on Tehran's nuclear-weapons ambitions. At the outset of his "reign," Mr. Obama was also anxious to reduce our nuclear weapon stockpile to a state of nonexistence, and that is no doubt to be accomplished in some future executive order.

More acts like Indiana's needed

I am tired of the Tim Cooks and Marc Benioffs of the world pushing their self-righteous and sanctimonious versions of "civil rights" and morality onto the rest of society ("Tim Cook, Apple CEO, calls 'religious objection' laws dangerous," Web, March 30).

U.S. skilled labor in short supply

Manufacturing has declined in the United States because the nature of manufacturing has changed. Hand labor can be and has been largely replaced by machines, and skilled labor has become even more important as a result.

Illustration on the waning of sexual political scandals by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sex among the goofballs

What is going on in American politics of late? There has not emerged a truly goofball politician since Anthony Weiner, the congressman and later New York mayoral candidate who could not resist sending pictures of his private part so frequently and to so many women, that it really was no longer a private part but rather a public spectacle. Go ahead, Google it. In fact, Yahoo it. My guess is there are dozens of pictures of Mr. Weiner's public private part all over the Internet.

Not all discrimination is bad

It seems to me there is a false underlying assumption about the criticism of Indiana's religious freedom law ("Obama now hits religious freedom in Indiana," Page I, March 30). We are being conditioned to think of all discrimination as bad. I remember when a discriminating shopper was thought of as one who had standards of quality and would only buy products that came up to those standards. Is that type of discrimination bad?

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks question during a news conference, Tuesday, March 31, 2015, in Indianapolis. Pence said that he wants legislation on his desk by the end of the week to clarify that the state's new religious-freedom law does not allow discrimination against gays and lesbians. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Bad faith in Indiana

The row over Indiana's religious liberty law breaks new ground in the war between religious liberty and the liberal political agenda. If there's no conflict, you have to make one up. This contretemps blew up out of nowhere, and inquiring minds want to know how and why it happened.

Plane passengers murdered illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When evil flies as co-pilot

Ask yourself this question: When you hear that Andreas Lubitz was "depressed" and had "mental illness," what additional information does this give anyone about the miserable miscreant who killed 149 innocent people by setting an Airbus A320 on a trajectory to crash into the French Alps? Or how to stop the next one?

Illustration on corruption behind Cover Oregon by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Adding corruption to Obamacare incompetence

Deception and unaccountability have plagued Obamacare from the start. First, millions of Americans found out that, contrary to promises, they couldn't keep the health insurance plans they liked. Then a botched website rollout spoiled the law's enrollment debut. Now, in the law's first real tax season, the federal government sent 800,000 enrollees incorrect tax forms.

Ornery H.L. Mencken loved baseball

As baseball season thunders down upon us — Go Nats! — let us pause to give loud huzzahs to the Library of America and the Washington writer Marion Elizabeth Rodgers, first for defying self-appointed literary censors, and also for revealing the hidden love of the national pastime by none other than Baltimore's famed scourge of bunkum, H.L. Mencken.

The Internal Revenue Service Headquarters (IRS) building is seen in Washington on April 13, 2014. Unscrupulous tax preparers are using President Obama's health care law as a ploy to pocket bogus fines from unsuspecting taxpayers, including some immigrants not bound by the law's requirements, the IRS warned March 13, 2015. (Associated Press)

Ax the income tax

The most efficient solution would junk income taxes altogether in favor of a simple national sales tax.

U.S. manufacturing jobs illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Returning to ‘Made in the USA’

Now that the presidential race is in full swing, it's time for robust talking about issues and creating awareness about problems, which only seem to come to light when the American public is focused choosing a new national leader.

The U.S. Capitol building is seen through the columns on the steps of the Supreme Court in Washington, May 5, 2014. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A challenge to Congress

When Richard Nixon signed the legislation establishing the Environmental Protection Agency in 1970, he was praised for his vision and commitment to conservation "going forward," though that cliche had yet to be coined. A few critics — "outliers," in another cliche waiting to be born — warned that the EPA could grow into a nightmare of a bureaucracy, but no one paid attention. Jeremiahs are rarely popular at the picnic.

Vote out establishment politicians

Every nation's history has its share of turning points, events that change its course. The great ones are remembered in history. America's best-known recent turning point occurred on Aug. 6, 1945, when the United States cemented its place as the most powerful nation in the history of mankind.

Illustration on Iran's greater ambitions in the Middle East by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Satrapy fishing in the Yemen

Three years ago, film-goers were treated to "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen," which critic Kenneth Turan called a "pleasant fantasy" about the Middle East. Today, of course, Yemen is the hub of a bloody conflict, one which President Obama persists in viewing with equal unreality.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, second left, U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, left, British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, center, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov, second right, and German Foreign Minister Frank Walter Steinmeier wait for the start of a meeting on Iran's nuclear program with other officials from France, China, the European Union and Iran at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland Tuesday, March 31, 2015. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)

62 percent of conservative Republicans disapprove of nuclear talks with Iran: Poll

- The Washington Times

As the deadline for nuclear talks with Iran looms, 49 percent of Americans approve of the U.S. negotiating directly with Iran over its nuclear program, 40 percent disapprove says a Pew Research Center poll. "There are deep ideological divisions," the poll says, reporting that 72 percent of liberal Democrats approve of the negotiations, while 62 percent of conservative Republicans disapprove of them.

Zoe Buck, a 14-month-old child, checks out an empty voting booth as at her mother, Julie Buck, votes at left, Tuesday Nov. 4, 2014, at the Alaska Zoo polling place in Anchorage, Alaska. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

When considering 2016 candidates, the biggest litmus tests for GOP voters: ISIS and abortion

The Washington Times

Republican voters appear to be dug in on two very specific issues which could very well sway their votes when the time comes. "The deal-breakers: What rules Republican candidates in or out?" asks a new CBS News survey. "The poll tested a number of policy positions in general terms, asking Republicans if they would consider voting for a hypothetical candidate for the party's nomination who holds a different view on an issue than they did,"

Illustration on the death of Terri Schiavo by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terri Schiavo's inconvenient life

I spent the night of March 30, 2005, in a Florida hospice. I was at the bedside of Terri Schiavo during the last 14 hours of her earthly life, right up until five minutes before her death. During that time with Terri, joined by her brother and sister, I told Terri over and over that she had many friends around the country, many people who were praying for her and were on her side. I told her the same thing during my visits to her in the months before her feeding tube was removed. I am convinced she understood.

Carson not candidate — yet

On March 27 I was advised that a guest op-ed I wrote for The Washington Times on March 25 was raising questions about whether I was describing myself as a candidate for president of the United States ("The learning curve of a candidate," Web, March 24). First, I have enjoyed my time writing for The Times and thank all of the readers who have given me feedback. While my words may not have been precise, be assured I have not declared my candidacy for president in any shape or form.

Trust but verify illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When even ‘trust but verify’ won’t do

If the United States cannot verify that Iran isn't developing nuclear weapons, then President Obama swears he won't strike a deal with Tehran. This week, though, he seems hell-bent on doing precisely that, despite lingering questions about Iranian cheating. It is enough to drive a good man to distraction. Former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton even argued in an editorial last week that we should bomb Iran ourselves before the Israelis beat us to the punch.