Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Classified Dossier Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Democrats’ ‘dossier’

The recent intelligence report on Russian interference in the election concluded that the Russian government was behind the hacking and release of Democratic emails. The assumed purpose of these activities was an effort to support the candidacy of Donald Trump, even though the report acknowledged that the Russian government believed Hillary Clinton was likely to win the election anyway.

Texas Power Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The power of Rick Perry

As former energy secretaries in a Republican and Democratic administration, we can say with complete confidence that President-elect Donald Trump has made an excellent choice in nominating Rick Perry to be secretary of energy. From our perspective, Mr. Perry has precisely the background, skill set and vision needed to effectively oversee the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and guide the nation’s energy strategies.

Prospects for the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pruitt is right for the EPA

Of all the ways the outgoing Obama administration has waged war on the private sector, nothing has been as deeply felt as the economically harmful actions taken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer speaks at a recent news conference Monday, May 23, 2016, regarding a new ordinance for the city regarding drugs in San Diego.  Faulconer's low-key style has gone down well with voters after the high drama of a predecessor who resigned and pleaded guilty to a felony for harassing women. The Republican leader is a heavy favorite to win a second term as mayor of the nation's eighth-largest city. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

Making America’s cities great again

The historic, controversial presidential election of 2016 is now behind us. The people decided. Now comes the hard part, governing. As usually happens after a presidential campaign, serious, talented individuals come forth to help. There is something magical about contributing to a new federal administration, a chance to effect change across America.

FILE - In this May 10, 2016, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves at parade participants at the Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea is marking Kim Jong Un's birthday Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017 in a decidedly low-key manner. Though the young leader's birthday is well-known throughout the country, it has yet to be celebrated with the kind of adulatory festivities that accompany the birthdays of his late grandfather and father. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

China’s boost to North Korean nukes

Allowing North Korea to make consistent progress toward the fielding of a nuclear-armed intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of reaching most American cities can be considered President Obama’s most serious failure in national security and non-proliferation.

Washington’s chance to reform the status quo

The United States is a great nation, but we face many serious challenges that need to be addressed. Two key ones relate to the need to ensure fiscal sustainability and achieve government transformation. As a recognized expert in these areas, I have several thoughts that I believe President-elect Donald Trump needs to consider.

Obama’s betrayal of the Cuban people

I couldn’t have imagined that President Obama could do any more harm to the Cuban people before he left office, but I was wrong. With only a week left in his presidency he announced that the long-standing policy of accepting Cubans that flee the Communist island of Cuba by sea — the policy known as “wet feet, dry feet” — would change.

U.N. Deal Deniers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

That parting shot at Israel

According to well-established sources in Egyptian Intelligence Services, a Palestinian Authority (PA) delegation met in Washington D.C. with officials from the outgoing Obama administration for secret talks. Secretary of State John Kerry and National Security Adviser Susan Rice were present.

Elephant With Two Pyramids Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A plea for ‘tart reform’

There’s an elephant in the middle of the emergency room, but we’re too busy arguing about Obamacare to see him.

Rep. Keith Ellison (Associated Press)

Democrats wasting time hating Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

Democrats who confuse hating Donald Trump with Mom and apple pie as the all-American recipe to win elections are blowing their chances, such as they are, for the 2018 midterm elections. If you’re a Democrat it’s never too soon to fret and stew about the prospects.

Lobbying Trump Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lobbying in the age of Trump

A conservative wit once said that if you want to know who runs Washington, you should look under “association” in the Washington phone book. The line gets a good laugh, but it’s unfair — which may be why it gets the laugh. And it’s particularly unfair to small businesses and companies employing forgotten middle-class workers.

Religious Freedom Problems in Turkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turkey’s wavering support for religious freedom

I walked into the Ankara airport on Dec. 20, after a long day of eye-opening meetings, to the news on CNN International — the Russian ambassador to Turkey had just been shot. Our U.S. ambassador to Turkey, John Bass, a career diplomat who expertly navigated our previous 24 hours of intensive meetings, was standing next to me. He calmly pulled out his cellphone and started making calls.

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2013 file photo, animal rights activist and co-founder of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) Ingrid Newkirk lies on a mock barbecue stand as a sign of protest in Mumbai, celebrating World Vegan Month, a month long celebration of a health, environment- and animal-friendly vegan diet. PETA turns 35 years old in 2015, is the largest animal rights group in world with 3 million members, and has done a lot with a little sex, shock and celebrity.(AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool, File)

Is veganism a mental disorder?

Contrary to the national and local debates we have about securing the border, anchor babies and sanctuary cities, the Swiss have a different system to determine who stays and who goes. Your neighbors get to vote on your citizenship. It’s a policy that at a minimum should promote politeness.

Related Articles

American Drug Crisis Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When the drug crisis hits home

No one wants to read about drug addiction, abuse, overdose numbers and young death. Why should they? Why should anyone who is steady, healthy and cogent enough to be combing a newspaper, or scanning news on their iPhone care much about someone who -- all the world assumes -- lost their own future, made avoidable mistakes? Not my lane. Not my worry. Not my world, right? Wrong.

Sexual Assault Police Industry Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Denying due process for campus sex assault cases

No longer content to deny due process to accused university students in the wake of often unsubstantiated and frequently false charges of sexual harassment and assault, there is now a movement toward destroying any hope for these students to transfer to other colleges and universities.

Members of the state Assembly listen to an address by Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, D-Paramount, at the in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

Failing the children of California

At the start of each new year we're subjected to a whole host of new laws. The modern liberal government, you see, imagines itself not as the champion of individual freedom but as Mommy and Daddy, a taskmaster charged with controlling your life. Most of the time, it makes everything, including our lives, worse.

Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to the media on Capitol Hill in Washington on Nov. 29, 2016. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Delay of game

What goes around comes around, and never more often than in the partisan games politicians play. Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, the new leader of the Democrats in the U.S. Senate, is determined to put a quick finish to whatever honeymoon Donald Trump may get when he becomes the president two weeks hence.

FILE - In this July 15, 2016 file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell speaks during a session about opioids at the National Governors Association meeting, in Des Moines, Iowa. Addressing worries about rising premiums and dwindling competition, Burwell says the federal health care overhaul is sustainable even without any legislative fixes from Congress. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

Striking a blow for good sense

When the urge to be edgy leads to fad, the unique, the uncommon and sometimes the weird and goofy is suddenly high fashion. In 2016, "transgenderism," the urge to be what you're not, became a fad. A visitor from Mars might think that every Earthling is determined only to change his sex and find an inappropriate place to pee.

Attorney General Nominee Jeff Sessions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A media noose for Jeff Sessions

Dishonest media attacks against President-Elect Donald Trump's nominee for attorney general, Jeff Sessions, won't derail his confirmation. But it's important to discuss where they come from because not everyone who realizes their origin is comfortable with that conversation.

Man of No Substance Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's coming obscurity

President Obama will leave office after eight years of strutting even while sitting down, of preening even while standing up, of swanking while playing 18 holes. Yet he remains the first president in American history to cast no shadow. Jimmy Carter cast a pale and minuscule shadow. Lyndon Johnson cast an obscene shadow. Mr. Obama leaves absolutely no shadow, even in the moonlight.

Triumphant Trump Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump's first 100 days

It's apparent that Donald Trump was -- to employ a neologism coined by President George W. Bush 16 years ago -- misunderestimated. But those who gave odds that he couldn't transform from a successful businessman into a successful politician are now betting he can't transform from a successful politician into a successful statesman.

Financial Crisis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Financial perils in 2017

Donald Trump promises sweeping changes in economic policies to make Americans more prosperous. However, asset and debt bubbles, enabled by easy money policies, could derail his plans and thrust the global economy into another recession.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Forging the Star: The Official Modern History of the United States Marshalls Service'

The U.S. Marshals Service may be the oldest U.S. law enforcement agency, but it is perhaps the least known and understood by the general public. Most of us who grew up in the 1950s and 1960s know the U.S. marshal from TV and the movies. From John Wayne to Hugh O'Brian, the TV/movie frontier deputy U.S. marshal was a symbol of law and order during a generally lawless time and place.

Time for the GOP to Clean Up the Obama Mess Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why the Obama legacy is doomed

Despite their efforts to cement President Obama's legacy, it was his legacy that defeated Democrats in November. Republicans therefore have every right to confidently challenge it. This approach offers the party their best chance to align with America's center-right majority and deny Democrats the legacy they need even more than Mr. Obama does.

Restore equality for boys, men

I hope that the incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump will act immediately to restore equal justice, equal rights and equal opportunity to those whom the Obama administration has denied all these things -- boys, men and fathers. An excellent starting point would be the Department of Education, which will be under his direct administrative control ("Donald Trump and Bill Gates find common ground," Web, Dec. 28).

History will see Obama clearly

Newsweek's print publication closed its doors in late 2016. Despite its liberal reputation, it had recently found the guts to speak the truth about President Obama's agenda. In his final column for the print edition, Matt Patterson wrote that future historians will ask how a man as devoid of professional accomplishments as Mr. Obama could beguile so many, making them believe that he could manage the world's greatest economy, lead the most powerful military and be leader of the free world.

China on the Trump Radar Screen Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Halting China's free ride

President-elect Donald Trump ran an election campaign that challenged American diplomacy's long-standing principles and shibboleths. Since his election triumph, Mr. Trump is already rewriting the rules of the presidency and signaling that his foreign policy approach will be unconventional.