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Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A lesson from Yemen

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week’s State of the Union address is that the economic “crisis is over.” Apparently, we’ve been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama’s celebration was the old “Icky Shuffle” end zone dance.

Illustration on school choice by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The steady progress of school choice

Sunday marked the start of National School Choice Week, an annual celebration of education reforms that give parents the power to pick the schools, public or private, that are best for their children.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering “free” health care, “free” phones and “free” food to the masses, he’s upped the bribery to “free” community college tuition and “free” child care. It’s not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

Related Articles

Rep. Robert Aderholt, Alabama Republican, has introduced legislation to counter President Obama's executive amnesty proposal. (Robert Aderholt)

Push-back legislation against executive amnesty from Robert Aderholt and Steve King gains momentum

- The Washington Times

While the opening dramas of the 114th Congress played out, one Alabama Republican was in action mode: Rep. Robert Aderholt quickly introduced the "Repeal Executive Amnesty Act," directed at President Obama's executive amnesty proposal, an idea that has irked conservatives for many weeks. And Rep. Robert Aderholt's legislation is gaining momentum - including an endorsement from Sen. Jeff Sessions, also from Alabama.

ATSC standard protects consumers

In "TV digital streaming technology speeds past FCC License rule" (Web, Jan. 1) it is not clear whether op-ed writer Andrew Langer's intention is to argue for a change in law or to malign MPEG LA with incorrect and misleading information. Although the former — whether over-the-air broadcast TV services should be freely accessible through every TV set sold in the United States — may be a subject of fair debate, the latter is deceitful and irresponsible.

Illustration on aspirants to the presidency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The presidential look in the mirror

The race for the presidency never ends. More than a few politicians lusting after a desk in the Oval Office begin planning years and even decades in advance for the day when they'll get their shot.

Republicans in Congress are rushing their own end-of-February deadline to try to halt President Obama's amnesty program. But with Mr. Obama holding veto power, it's more likely his policy gets decided in the courts, and the Texas case is one of several where the president's amnesty is under scrutiny. (Associated Press)

Flimsy facts in the economic road show

Arule sometimes attributed to 19th century British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli says there are three falsehoods used to support a weak case in government: "Lies, damned lies and statistics."

Federal regulations are intended to make everyone safer and healthier. But rules imposed without regard to cost can and often do inflict more pain than pleasure. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Regulating the regulators

Americans hear a welcome jingle of coins in their pockets when they pull away from the gasoline pumps, and that music might get a little louder in coming weeks. With the price at the pump now little more than $2 a gallon in most places, drivers can look forward to saving $75 billion in annual fuel costs. The open road never looked more inviting.

Jaime Rodas and his daughter, Aria Rodas 3 enjoy an afternoon of sledding on Tuesday Jan. 6, 2015 on a hill in Jim Barnett Park in Winchester, Vvaa. (AP Photo/The Winchester Star, Ginger Perry)

Rough sledding

Winter, with its ice, snow and slush, doesn't offer many rewards — unless you're a kid with a sled, or an old inner tube or a big piece of cardboard. Then you can slide toward heaven, where, if you're lucky, a big pot of hot chocolate awaits in Mom's toasty kitchen.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press)

Obama should stand tall to Islam

The radical Muslims who are making war on the world are confident they can win, destroy religious and ethical beliefs and cultures different from their own, and impose a worldwide caliphate.

Christie Cowboys furor not news

People need to get over the fact that New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is a Cowboys fan ("Christie attends Cowboys game as guest, hugs owner," web, Jan. 5). So are people from all over the United States.

Reliving the life of a Seneca warrior

Jane Whitefield is unique in the annals of detective fiction. She is a throwback to a tribal world, still loyal to the beliefs of the Seneca Indians and still adhering to the call of a lost era. Thomas Perry has once again resurrected a remarkable character who seems imbued with a strange immortality and an unusual morality, and he is to be congratulated.

Korea Cyber Attack on Hollywood Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Preventing a 'cyber Pearl Harbor'

It took an attack by a nation-state on Hollywood to bring the threat of cyberattacks to the forefront of the Americans' consciousness, but we have been fighting this war for decades.

France weighs the tragic cost of appeasement

The attack on the offices and staff of the French satirical paper, Charlie Hebdo, by three heavily armed men shouting out the name of God in Arabic is nothing less than a declaration of war by hordes of heathen barbarians against the civilized world. They would want us to think that they are acting in the name of God.

FILE - This is a Friday, Oct. 17, 2014 file photo of Russian President Vladimir Putin and French President Francois Hollande, right, during a meeting on the sidelines of the  ASEM summit of European and Asian leaders in Milan, northern Italy. EU sanctions against Russia over the crisis in Ukraine are cutting both ways and pinching some big European companies. But economic relief isn't likely any time soon, diplomats and analysts say: EU rules make the sanctions tough to overturn.  France, Germany, Russia and Ukraine are trying to set up talks in Astana, Kazakhstan, toward easing the tensions behind sanctions that have hit Russia's economy, sent the ruble sinking and affected corporate Europe _ including banks, oil companies, machinery makers and food giants.    (AP Photo/Daniel Dal Zennaro, Pool, File)

The curious case of Vlad the Embezzler

Beware of historians bearing analogies. If every two-bit dictator whom post-World War II pundits and scholars have compared to Hitler or Stalin packed even a tenth of the wallop of the originals, we would all have been engulfed in World War III years ago. The latest dictator to come in for the Hitler-Stalin treatment is that indubitably bad, more than a little power-mad master of the Kremlin, Vladimir Putin.

The tiny nano-drone Zano promises to take the ultimate selfie. (Lantronix)

Dronies, anyone? Tiny drone packed with technology aspires to deliver the ultimate selfie

- The Washington Times

Now creating buzz: Zano, a powerful little drone that comes with a promise: "Taking your selfies to new heights." It can perch on a palm then rise up to snap high quality still or video images with a 5-megapixel camera. "Oh, the noble quest for the perfect selfie," says Jill Scharr, a staff writer for Tom's Guide, an industry review. "Meet the Zano, a camera-equipped drone barely bigger than a person's hand, and designed to let users take high-quality photos that even a selfie stick can't reach."

Mario Cuomo            Associated Press photo

Nixon, Cuomo and me

One summer morning in 2009, my cellphone beeped with a message. The voice at the other end was deep, resonant, authoritative but friendly.

People gather outside the French Consulate in Toronto on Wednesday Jan. 7, 2015 in response to the shootings earlier in the day at Charlie Hebdo Magazine in Paris. The writing on the signs reads "I am Charlie." (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Chris Young)

Massacre in Paris

The boldness and the brutality of the Islamist terrorists know no bounds, and neither, until now, has the reluctance of the West to confront evil in whatever guise it presents itself.

'Gitmo' more dangerous open

Your recent editorial "Guantanamo terrorists leave, threat to America grows" (Web, Jan. 4) exaggerates the risk of releasing prisoners from Guantanamo and ignores the threat of keeping them there. The recidivism rate for Guantanamo detainees released under President Obama is not 30 percent, but 6.4 percent. Further, detainees are not released at random. They must be cleared unanimously for release by the agencies and departments in charge of our national security: the departments of Defense, Homeland Security, Justice and State, as well as the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

Lamenting liberty lost

A British author, residing in the United States for the past 30 years, created a small firestorm earlier this week with his candid observations that modern-day Americans have been duped by the government into accepting a European-style march toward socialism because we fail to appreciate the rich legacy of personal liberty that is everyone's birthright and is expressly articulated in the Declaration of Independence and guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

Bess Myerson, Miss America 1945             Associated Press photo

Bess Myerson, first Jewish Miss America, dies at 90

Bess Myerson, whose death at age 90 was revealed this week, was a Miss America who lived through nearly a century of change in the perception of "the ideal American woman." She paid for celebrity in the way many celebrities before and after her paid. She was crowned in 1945, when the Miss America Pageant was taken more seriously than it is today, and she was anything but the typical "queen of femininity."