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Illustration on giving thanks for the American military by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Grateful for American muscle

We Americans have much to be grateful for. Every year we gather together with friends and family to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday. When we do, we should be grateful as well for the service of the American military in far-flung outposts.

Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen answers to the House Oversight Committee in the panel's continuing probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the government's tax agency, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Earlier this month, IRS official Lois Lerner was called to testify about the controversy but refused to answer questions by committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and invoked her Fifth Amendment rights at least nine times. Associated Press Photo

Impeach IRS chief John Koskinen

After revelations that the Internal Revenue Service was restricting political speech and targeting conservative and tea party groups, John Koskinen was appointed to head the agency, promising reform and transparency.

The monument to General Gouverneur K. Warren at Gettysburg     The Washington Times

A Thanksgiving message in bronze

In the fall of 1865, America marked its first Thanksgiving since the end of the Civil War. Seven months earlier, after Robert E. Lee had surrendered on April 9, the North held a spontaneous jubilee. Cannons boomed, fireworks illuminated the night sky, bands played, people sang in the streets and crowds cheered the savior of the Union, Abraham Lincoln.

Religious Roots of Thanksgiving Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Proclaiming a day of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the time when America’s religious roots and traditions are publicly displayed. While we think of feasting at tables filled with food and drink, and imagine the Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony inviting neighboring Indians to join them to celebrate a plentiful harvest, Thanksgiving Day has a much more religious meaning. It was not uncommon in the 17th and 18th centuries for individual colonies to set aside days for prayers of gratitude to our Lord.

An American flag sits in front of gravestones on Veterans Day at San Francisco National Cemetery in the Presidio of San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

A refugee’s tale of Thanksgiving

As I grew up in America, I came to realize that the most effective antidote for fear is not courage, but gratitude.

Illustration on the processing of national security intelligence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to presidential campaign advisers

This memorandum is addressed to the brave souls advising presidential candidates. As you know, the recent terrorist attacks in France — and in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Israel — have altered the political landscape. With less than a year to go before the 2016 election, the landscape may stay altered even if there are no more attacks — and that seems unlikely.

The Approval of Technical Wrong Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the gun-ignorant make gun laws

When the state of Maryland quietly killed off its 15-year, $5 million social experiment in gun control — so-called “ballistic fingerprinting” — it served up the latest example of people who know nothing about firearms making technical laws about guns. The news of this latest failure (not a single crime solved in 15 years) followed New York shutting down a similar program, and it generated from gun owners and gun makers a tired “We told you so.”

MS St. Louis, 1939. The Voyage of Doom.

Stopping the next Holocaust

By now, in the days following the Paris massacre and the Brussels lockdown, many Americans have been reminded of the awful fate of the S.S. Saint Louis. In 1939, fleeing the impending doom of the Holocaust, some 900 Jews boarded the cruise ship in Hamburg, Germany, and crossed the Atlantic.

NATO Safe Area for Refugees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Responding to humanitarian catastrophe

The international community just celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Accords, a landmark peace agreement that brought an end to the Bosnian War and a grave humanitarian crisis in the Balkans.

Illustration on the need for streamlines conceal carry permits in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/the Washington Times

Fighting ISIS with concealed carry

Following the recent Paris attacks, the Islamic State recently announced its intention to “strike America at its center,” in Washington, D.C. Our response should be swift and decisive.

Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon           Associated Press photo

A military witch hunt that almost succeeded

Along with many Americans, I salute The Washington Times for having the courage to not only report on the Air Force general court martial persecution-prosecution of Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon, but to continue following this case with a series of updates from the courtroom trial in Minot, N.D., until the court martial concluded on Nov. 14.

Former President George W. Bush speaks at the George W. Bush Institute at Southern Methodist University in Dallas on Feb. 19, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

How Obama cooks the terrorism numbers

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama has given an eloquent testimony to a Christian faith, but his sympathies are always with Islam. He insisted from Asia that “99.9 percent of Muslims worldwide reject terrorism,” and that’s good news, if true. But it clearly is not.

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BOOK REVIEW: 'The Christmas Truce: Myth, Memory and the First World War'

"History has a double role: to destroy the illusions of the past and to create out of the debris a more extended, a more rational, a more detached sense of human destiny," the British historian Lady Elizabeth Longford wrote in her biography of the Duke of Wellington.

Fund public transit now

It's time for Congress to get serious about investing in public transit. It's good news that both the House and Senate have passed multi-year transportation bills, but it's not enough simply to move forward with the same transportation strategy we've always had.

U.S. can still fix Iran deal

President Obama may not have any interest in war, but war may have an interest in him, as the old Russian proverb goes. Congress and the next president must correct the dangerous Obama defense policy on ground forces before it does real harm to the U.S. military.

In this picture released by the official website of the office of the Iranian supreme leader, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei delivers a speech during a meeting in Tehran, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015.  (Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP)

Submission to tyrants

When the nation's negotiators shake on a deal at the bargaining table, the result ought to be peace and good feeling. But not when one of the parties agreeing to peace in our time is the Islamic Republic of Iran. Once it signed its long-sought nuclear deal with the United States and its global partners, the mullahs went home to search for more rope.

Members of Concerned Student 1950, University of Missouri's Graduate Professional Council, faculty and student supporters gather at Mel Carnahan Quadrangle to rally in support of an ongoing protest to get UM System President Tim Wolfe to resign on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Tensions have been rising throughout the week following MU student Jonathan Butler's decision to hold a hunger strike Monday, Nov. 1. In response to today's protest and the Missouri football athlete strike, President Wolfe did announce his decision to resign. (Matt Hellman/Missourian via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Mob rule on campus

If the campus is an accurate reflection of the rising generation, the nation has frightful prospects. The "kids" are in the streets again, trying to reprise the fun of the '60s, long before they were born, but the decade that formed many of their professors.

Illustration on Obama's plan to issue millions of H visas to illegal aliens by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Work permit palooza

Overreach has defined President Obama. Now determined to accomplish through regulation with a Republican Congress what he failed to do through legislation with a Democratic one, Mr. Obama may soon attempt another overhaul of America's immigration system.

The saga of the Vietnam vet

"Pow" is the sound of a muffler blast from a past-its-prime car. Suddenly, you're face down on the sidewalk, biting gritty cement, with one arm outstretched and the other bent firmly against your side. As you lay on the cold winter concrete reaching for a weapon that doesn't exist, you look up to see two somewhat familiar men in business attire.

A Secret Service police officer stands outside El Reno Federal Correctional Institution in El Reno, Okla. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

When 'hang 'em' all meets 'free 'em all'

- The Washington Times

Political demands for an end to what activists and the media like to call mass incarceration are all the rage these days, but the bipartisan willingness to look at what works and doesn't work in today's broken criminal justice system that has emerged in recent years is being overtaken or hijacked by ideological hucksters who seem more interested in making political statements than in finding real-world solutions to serious problems.

In this photo taken through a window, Cuban videographers film the U.S. flag from a crane after it was raised at the U.S. Embassy in Havana, Friday, Aug. 14, 2015. The Stars and Stripes rose over the newly reopened U.S. Embassy after a half-century of broken diplomatic relations. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

An upsurge in misery in Cuba

Barack Obama's attempt to woo Fidel and Raul Castro away from their regime's totalitarian roots has turned from disaster to catastrophe, giving a new and ugly meaning to President Obama's campaign slogan of "hope and change." So far there's been no change and no hope, but more misery.

USPS red ink is Washington's

The U.S. Postal Service is older than the country itself, delivers to 153 million homes and businesses, and consistently ranks as the public's most trusted federal agency. Yet misinformation about it abounds. Some such misinformation unfortunately appeared in Drew Johnson's column of Oct. 29 ("Postal service lies cost us billions," Web).

President Barack Obama makes a statement on the Keystone Pipeline from the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, Nov. 6, 2015.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The sickening toll of Obamacare

Obamacare was supposed to provide more Americans with more affordable health care. The result would be fewer Americans suffering budget-breaking medical expenses and more Americans living a healthy life.

Congress, fully fund GMD

As North Korea moves toward testing its nuclear weapons and long-range missiles, Congress must ensure that our nation is defended by fully funding our defenses against these threats ("U.S. and South Korea formulate plan to deal with North Korea's missiles," Web, Nov. 4).

Obama Rejects Keystone Pipeline Project Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keystone kaput for now

President Obama's unilateral rejection of the proposed KeystoneXL oil pipeline that would have brought petroleum and jobs to the United States is another in a long list of issues dominated by politics rather than common sense, economics and science.

Illustration on corrupt charities in the U.S. by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Tis the season for scamming

With Halloween behind us, a deluge of Christmas advertising is already starting to pervade the landscape. And with that is the beginning of another round of year-end fundraising appeals from charities. If you get a letter in the mail or see a tear-jerking ad on TV, make sure your heart doesn't get ahead of your head.

Illustration on the contentious nature of political debate by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

A renewed call for Senate civility

It's billed as "the world's greatest deliberative body." But at a time when public polls routinely place the popularity of federal lawmakers in single digits, it's time to ask: What happened to the U.S. Senate?

Ben Carson. (Associated Press)

Ben Carson learns about his 'place'

- The Washington Times

A black candidate for president learns the hard way that the media culture expects him to know a black man's place, and stay there. That place has to be in the Democratic Party.

Illustration on maintaining a balance of Pacific trade with the U.S. by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Choosing concession over protection

"When politicians can determine what can be bought and sold, the first thing to be bought and sold will be politicians." -- Mark Twain

BOOK REVIEW: 'Hitler at Home'

How did Adolf Hitler go from a figure of fun often likened to Charlie Chaplin's tramp to the leader so beloved by the bulk of Germany's population, no matter what they claimed in this regard after he had brought unheard-of mayhem, destruction and shame on them and their nation?