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Nancy Pelosi    Associated Press photo

The revolt of the peasants gathers steam

- The Washington Times

The populist saber continues to cut the elites down to size. The elites, who think they know it all and are uniquely qualified to tell everyone else how to live, took another pasting Sunday in the Italian elections. Prime Minister Matteo Renzi felt so humiliated by voter rejection of his proposals for constitutional reform that he quit on the spot.

Illustration on Chinese industrial pollution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s China challenge

President Donald Trump will reject one concept and embrace another as he confronts China on trade and pollution. He expressed skepticism for “the concept of global warming created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. industry noncompetitive.”

Illustration on keeping military strategy secret by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

From Churchill’s lips to Trump’s ears

In the third and final presidential debate, Republican nominee Donald Trump claimed that U.S. foreign policy regularly fails to engage “the element of surprise” when it comes to engaging the Islamic State, or ISIS. According to Mr. Trump, our enemies “have all left” the Iraqi city of Mosul because ISIS was given warning months in advance.

Trucking Delivers the Holidays Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trucking delivers the holidays

Family gatherings with a delicious turkey on the table. Friends and communities joining together for holiday traditions. Stores and sidewalks bustling as we shop for presents to exchange with loved ones. Wreaths on doors and ornate decorations lighting up downtowns.

SEIU Local 1 union members protest for an increase in the minimum wage, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 at the Detroit Metropolitan Airport in Romulus, Mich. Fast-food restaurant and airport workers, as well as home and child-care workers rallied in cities including Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Minneapolis and New York on Tuesday morning. In many cities the protesters blocked busy intersections. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

The Trump challenge to Big Labor

According to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics, labor unions spent more than $142 million on federal candidates, parties and outside spending trying to influence the 2016 election — more than double what they spent in 2008. Even this eye-popping figure is conservative, as it doesn’t include big spending on ballot measures and other tactics to boost voter turnout.

Illustration on the Pearl Harbor attack by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pearl Harbor, 75 years on

The 75th anniversary of the Imperial Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor will soon be remembered again as a “Day of Infamy.” On Dec. 7, 1941, Japan launched over 350 aircraft from six carriers, flawlessly executing Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto’s strike plan “Z” and succeeded in crippling the U.S. Pacific Fleet.

Champion of 'Worst Former President' Competition Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Competing for the ‘worst former president’

Like an episode of “Survivor,” pitting one generation against another, former President Jimmy Carter is vying to retain the title of our worst and most pestiferous former president against the coming challenge by President Obama.

The "Climate Science" of Pope Francis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pope Francis and climate politics

Reuters reports, “Pope Francis urged national leaders on Monday to implement global environmental agreements without delay, a message that looked to be squarely aimed at U.S. President-elect Donald Trump.

Ron Wyden (Associated Press)

The churls and their denial and grief

- The Washington Times

Life is not fair to losers, or the critics of Donald Trump, and the way he won the presidency. He just won’t stand still and give the rotten eggs a chance to hit their mark.

Illustration on the promotion of U.S. trade by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s nationalism will preserve international stability

Economists and foreign policy experts fear Donald Trump’s economic nationalism will disrupt the global institutions that have fostered international economic cooperation and security for seven decades and instigate chaos.

The selection of Betsy DeVos to run the Department of Education was likely an easy call for President-elect Donald Trump, who during the campaign regularly championed school choice and the charter school movement, giving a nod to school choice when announcing his pick. (Associated Press)

The administration billionaires

President-elect Donald Trump and his Cabinet nominees won’t be in office until next month, but the stock market is already showing bullish signs of better days ahead under his pro-growth, tax reform agenda.

Putting Off the Congo Elections Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of a hasty Congo election

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been the target of criticism in recent weeks with editorials in major newspapers calling on our president to step down.

Illustration of John Bolton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘The man with the bushy moustache’

President-elect Donald Trump would be best served by selecting a secretary of State who understands the national security challenges our country faces, can literally “hit the ground running,” has a proven track record of successful negotiations, and most importantly, not only protects but projects the greatest attributes about America’s ideals of freedom and democracy.

Related Articles

U.S. Navy Losing its Moorings Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Securing the Navy

One has to wonder what is going on inside the U.S. Navy. A recent survey of U.S. Navy personnel delivered sobering news to out-going Obama Navy leadership. In arresting phrases, the September 2016 survey found that sailors are "increasingly unhappy with lengthy deployments, high operational tempo, and calls to reduce pay and benefits," and not interested in being pawns on a political correctness chessboard.

Illustration on U.S. response to China's belligerence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The greatest challenge to Trump

Thanks to eight years of feeble presidential leadership defined by buzzwords like "leading from behind," "don't do stupid stuff" and "red lines" that our enemies can cross at will, president-elect Donald Trump inherits an America that appears in retreat combined with a world that seems set ablaze.

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala. speaks to media at Trump Tower, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The left attacks Jeff Sessions on his past, but excuses Keith Ellison

- The Washington Times

President-elect Donald Trump has nominated Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions as attorney general. Expect the left to use Mr. Sessions' past statements on race as ammunition against him, while ignoring his record since then. Also expect those same people to make the argument that Rep. Keith Ellison's controversial past statements are a non-sequitur in his bid to become chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

Comey a patsy in Clinton affair

In "The Federal Bureau of Political Investigation" (Web, Nov. 16) Andrew P. Napolitano calls FBI Director James Comey's July 5 press conference, during which Mr. Comey said Hillary Clinton "would not be prosecuted," and his reopening and subsequent re-closing of that same investigation "unlawful."

Illustration on protecting religious liberty by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Protecting religious liberty

In 1994, nearly every member of Congress supported legislation affirming that the free exercise of religion is an "unalienable right." Four years later, Congress unanimously declared that religious freedom "undergirds the very origin and existence of the United States."

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. speaks at his weekly news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

'Don't drain my swamp'

The Democrats lost the 2016 elections because they weren't listening, and treated voters with legitimate concerns as racists, bigots and deplorables. Some Republicans in Congress aren't listening now.

Rudy Giuliani (Associated Press)

Chaos in transition, business as usual

- The Washington Times

The Democrats and their media acolytes keep sorting through the entrails of road kill looking for clues to find the disaster to unmake the making of the president. So far nothing has worked.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Precious and Grace: No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (17)'

Very few authors can write about forgiveness and do it with grace. Alexander McCall Smith is one of them. He writes with a philosophy infused with gentleness, whether it is about an orphaned dog or a woman who is brought to realize that there is still happiness in bitter memories.

The Grief of the Democrats Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'We just got a shellacking'

- The Washington Times

"We just had a shellacking. We just got a shellacking last Tuesday. We got an unexpected defeat and we've got to recalibrate it and decide how we go forward," Rep. G.K. Butterfield, the chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus told CNN this week after Donald Trump and Republicans swept elections in the House and Senate.