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Illustration on the decline of the FBI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why the FBI is hard to trust

- The Washington Times

Can anyone with a modicum of common sense trust the Federal Bureau of investigation? The answer to that question is a resounding “no.” The claim that the FBI strives to be above politics is today and has always been absurd. When former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover admitted in an interview that his “agents” had tapped the phones of 1964 Republican candidate Barry Goldwater and even bugged his campaign plane, Mr. Hoover told his interviewer, who wondered how someone in his position could so cavalierly ignore the law and the constitutional rights of American citizens, that when the president asks you deliver.

ACLU Legal and Policy director Rebecca Robertson talks during a news conference held by opponents of a "bathroom bill" at the Texas State Capitol, Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Austin, Texas. The Texas House is considering a bill that's different than one that sparked outcry when it cleared the state Senate last month. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

The ACLU goes hunting in Montana

In a 1981 speech before the California Peace Officers Assn., former Attorney General Ed Meese referred to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) as a “criminals’ lobby.”

Illustration on the need to deplot THAAD by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The folly of putting protection on ice

North Korea rarely misses an opportunity to threaten or provoke us. It does so most often with the launching of one or more ballistic missiles accompanied by a harangue that the missiles would soon be launched at us armed with nuclear weapons.

Illustration on the real situation of Cuba by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why the new Cuba policy misses the mark

President Donald Trump announced his Cuba policy in Miami last week. I commend him for many of his efforts. He unveiled a replacement policy for the disastrous Cuba policy President Obama put into place. The highlight of Mr. Obama’s policy was lifting an economic embargo that was placed after the Communist revolution of Fidel Castro brought the world to the brink of nuclear war with the Missile Crisis in 1962.

The Illinois Shop of Horrors Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Banana Republic of Illinois

The media has hyper-obsessed over the Kansas tax hike this year and has sold this as a repudiation of “supply side economics.” But the real story in the states has been the catastrophic effects of “tax and spend” fiscal policy in Illinois.

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The party’s over and no place to call home

- The Washington Times

That’s the dilemma of the Democrats, forlorn, despondent and walking in circles like the goose hit on the head with a long-handled wooden spoon. They’re asking questions for which there are no happy answers in the wake of their fourth straight loss in a round of special elections.

Illustration of Anne Morgan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Anne Morgan, an American Hero

The United States was finally in “the war to end all wars.” France had been ravaged since the summer of 1914. Villages and towns were obliterated. Women and children went hungry and homeless as the armies wrestled in futile combat in mud, blood and indescribable filth and disease. The British lost 20,000 dead in a single day at the Battle of the Somme.

Illustration on the decline of medical care quality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Supporting medicine and its finest practitioners

Treating emergencies isn’t your insurance talking. It’s doctoring. It’s nursing. It’s medical technology. It’s your stone-filled gallbladder obstructing and a top surgeon operating on it without delay. You can’t prove that a junior attending surgeon wouldn’t do just as well, but you can feel it when the wound is healing so well two days later where the angry raw organ was scope-sucked successfully from your body.

Illustration on the devaluation of U.S. bonds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Uncle Sam’s F-rated bonds

Were the United States any other country, its bonds would have long ago been downgraded to junk.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times

The thing people like about House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is that he is a serious guy who is capable of thinking big and has an ambitious agenda to salvage our ungovernable federal bureaucracy.

Photojournalist Shay Horse said he was pepper-sprayed while covering protests at the Jan. 21 presidential inauguration, even though his camera identified him as a journalist. (Sarah Nelson / The Washington Times)

Is ACLU lawsuit against D.C. cops a red herring?

- The Washington Times

“An officer told us to drop our pants,” Shay Horse said. “An officer went down the row telling each of us not to flinch as he grabbed our balls and yanked on them, and then stuck his finger up each of our anuses and wiggled it around. I felt like they were using molestation and rape as punishment.”

Illustration on the cultural importance of Shakespeare and his play, 'Julius Caesar'              The Washington Times

Donald Trump Julius Caesar mockery reduces Shakespeare

Whether the famous dead Roman is a look-alike for Donald Trump, with a blond comb-over and a long red tie, a cool black dude in a tailored suit suggesting Barack Obama, or a 1930s Orson Welles with a Sam Browne belt resembling Benito Mussolini, the character has captured the imagination of public and players since Shakespeare wrote it more than four centuries ago.

Illustration on the fiscal plight of Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sinking feeling in Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is drowning. The island, so popular with tourists, is $123 billion in debt. That’s more debt than the $18 billion bankruptcy filed by the city of Detroit in 2013. In May, San Juan declared a form of bankruptcy after creditors filed lawsuits demanding their money. A federal district judge appointed by Chief Justice John Roberts will handle the case.

Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism

“The Germans are either at your feet or at your throat,” wrote the Roman historian Tacitus 2,000 years ago. Sadly, that axiom is not just ancient history. In the last century, Germany started two world wars, caused the death and suffering of tens of millions, and was responsible for the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust.

Related Articles

In this Dec. 7, 2016, file photo Megyn Kelly poses at The Hollywood Reporter's 25th Annual Women in Entertainment Breakfast in Los Angeles. Kelly defended her decision to feature "InfoWars" host Alex Jones on her NBC newsmagazine despite taking heat Monday from families of Sandy Hook shooting victims and others, saying it's her job to "shine a light" on newsmakers. Critics argue that NBC's platform legitimizes the views of a man who, among other conspiracy theories, has suggested that the killing of 26 people at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012 was a hoax. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

Megyn Kelly under fire as JPMorgan pulls ads

- The Washington Times

Megyn Kelly, the former darling of Fox News who's just now coming to air on NBC, has already stoked some fires with her interviewing skills -- so much so with her chat with Alex Jones of Infowars fame that JPMorgan Chase has temporarily pulled its local and digital ads from the network and her show.

Republicans: Want Trump off Twitter? Fight for him then

- The Washington Times

Once again, prominent members of President Donald Trump's own political party have come out in full force to warn him to quiet down on the tweeting front. But here's a thought: If Republicans are so bent on getting Trump off Twitter, why don't they do some of the fighting for him?

Sacred Cow of India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A political stampede over India's sacred cow

India is in chaos again, but this time it's because of cows. And it's all happening during Prime Minister Narendra Modi's world tour that's underway this month.

Illustration on the plight of unionized employees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Employee Rights Act opportunity for Trump

On Wednesday, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce is holding a hearing on the Employee Rights Act (ERA). This proposed legislation, recently reintroduced by Rep. Phil Roe, Tennessee Republican, is the perfect vehicle for President Trump to regain his legislative momentum.

Government Collecting Financial Data Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Destroying financial privacy

Do you want your relatives, friends, business competitors and government bureaucrats to know precisely how much wealth you have, in what form, and how you spend all of your money?

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt attends a Cabinet meeting with President Donald Trump, Monday, June 12, 2017, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The bureaucrat behind the curtain

"Pay no attention to that man behind that curtain!" The Wizard of Oz had a good reason for trying to distract Dorothy when his true identity was revealed in the 1939 classic film. The last thing he wanted was for her to figure how things really operated.

Julius Caesar

Crossing the line to flirt with an assassination fantasy

- The Washington Times

The liberals and the left have been flirting with the fantasy of an assassination of Donald Trump since the early hours of last Nov. 9. If all the rants and diatribes, which make up the conversation where snowflakes, "intellectuals" and the morally elite gather to chat and chew, can't accomplish the elimination of the president by peaceable means, then why not by "any means necessary?"

Illustration on challenges to South Korea's economic prosperity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Advice for South Korea's Moon

In the 64 years since the end of the Korean War, South Korea has built itself into a regional economic powerhouse and a global innovator whose citizens enjoy a stable economy and democratic governance. At this moment in its history, however, serious economic, political and national security risks threaten this stunning accomplishment.

President Donald Trump steps off Air Force One as he arrives at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J., Friday, June 9, 2017. Trump is spending the weekend at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Lying liars

All politicians lie, because they are human and all humans lie. The question before us is this: If President Trump lied to FBI Director James Comey, should that "lie" lead to impeachment? Did he obstruct justice when he allegedly "hoped" that Mr. Comey would not pursue an investigation of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn? Many Democrats think so. Most Republicans do not.

Tracing the special relationship between American and British navies

In "A Tale of Two Navies," we have a refreshing new look at the special relationship of Britain and America written by an Englishman. Anthony Wells, born in Coventry, a graduate of the Royal Naval College who served in the Royal Navy and then emigrated to America, became a citizen and worked for U.S. intelligence and the U.S. Navy.

Comey courted Trump confidences

Is former FBI Director James Comey so obtuse that he does not realize his own complicity in orchestrating his Jan. 6, 2017, meeting with President Trump in a manner that set the parameters for the two men's interpersonal relationship ("James Comey debunks New York Times story that fueled unproven Trump-Russia collusion," Web, June 8)?

Voting, tallying separate systems

Andrew Napolitano's "Once in a while, a good leak" (Web, June 7) reads, in part: "the NSA discovered that Russian hackers in late October and early November 2016 planted cookies (attractive, uniquely tailored links) into the websites of 122 American city and county clerks responsible for counting ballots in the presidential election. This means that if any employee of those clerks' offices clicked onto any cookie, the hackers had access to — and thus the ability to interfere with — the tabulation of votes." The good judge is wrong.

Ice Cube attends a ceremony honoring him with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Monday, June 12, 2017, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

An angry cloud of snowflakes

Into each life a little rain must fall, as ancient wisdom teaches, and sometimes, when the season is right, the rain turns to snow. Many of these precious snowflakes fall on campus, but not all, and sometimes the snowflakes (mostly fragile millennials who imagine themselves, like snowflakes, unique) fall on unlikely places. Southern California is the last place to expect a heavy snowfall, but it happens. We can blame President Trump, apparently not global warming.

FILE - In this Friday, June 9, 2017 file photo, Iranians attend the funeral of victims of an Islamic State militant attack, in Tehran, Iran. Its strongholds in Iraq and Syria slipping from its grasp, the Islamic State group threatened to make this years Ramadan a bloody one at home and abroad. With attacks in Egypt, Britain and Iran among others and a land-grab in the Philippines, the group is trying to divert attention from its losses and win over supporters around the world in the twisted competition for jihadi recruits. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi, File)

Terror turnaround in Tehran

Terrorism is a scourge born in an evil place in the heart, extinguishing hope and breeding cynicism like little else. Now that the Islamic Republic of Iran has felt the lash of wholesale murder, perhaps the hard-hearted mullahs will reconsider their "holy" war against the world. Pigs, not necessarily the favorite animals of the followers of Muhammad, will sooner fly.

Oakland Raiders quarterback Derek Carr throws during the team's organized team activity at its NFL football training facility Tuesday, May 30, 2017, in Alameda, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

SNYDER: Fireworks ahead for the Cousins soap opera

The Kirk Cousins melodrama is coming to a head: Either he signs a long-term deal or he plays a second consecutive season under the franchise tag, virtually guaranteeing himself a roster spot with San Francisco, Los Angeles or elsewhere in 2018.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is one of many high profile Democrats attending a progressive ideas summit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, latest leftie to f-bomb over Trump

- The Washington Times

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Democrat, went on a bit of an f-bomb tangent during her recent address before the Personal Democracy Forum, telling the audience those who aren't "helping people" should go the eff home, saying President Donald Trump has not kept his promises -- eff no he hasn't.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., questions former FBI Director James Comey during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 8, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

John McCain, off rail, says Obama better than Trump

- The Washington Times

We know Sen. John McCain is no friend of President Donald Trump's -- but this is ridiculous. The Arizona senator, who says he's a Republican, actually came out and told a left-leaning overseas newspaper, the Guardian, that Barack Obama provided better leadership for America than Trump.