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Illustration on the Senate's utility in Obama's nuclear initiatives by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sen. Corker’s nuclear blunder

Sen. Bob Corker has a problem. As Bill Gertz reported in his “Inside the Ring” column, Mr. Corker, Tennessee Republican and chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, objects to President Obama’s intention to seek a evade the need for Senate “ratification” of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) by seeking its approval by the United Nations Security Council.

Illustration on the high stakes of international chess by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Like pawns on the chessboard

Those who lived through the decades-long Cold War between the old Soviet Union and the United States will remember that everyone seemed to take everything from the Olympics to international chess tournaments as part of the struggle. Chess is once again emerging as a point of controversy as we move toward what some fear could degenerate into yet another Cold War.

Two pro-democracy foundations launched by U.S. billionaire businessman George Soros have been officially banned by the Russian government. (Associated Press)

Soros’ Catholic useful idiots

A most remarkable set of documents was coughed up recently by WikiLeaks. George Soros’ Open Society Policy Center, it turns out, made donations to two faith-based organizations to the tune of $650,000. Initially, this might cause one to think that perhaps Mr. Soros has finally gotten religion. But, no.

In this photo released by Xinhua News Agency, a rescue helicopter and vessel take past in an emergency rescue drill held on the South China Sea near Fenghuang island in Sanya, southern China's Hainan Province, Aug. 23, 2016. The drill aims at enhancing the emergency response capabilities of maritime rescue teams. (Guo Cheng/Xinhua via AP)

China’s Underwater Great Wall

The stakes in the South China Sea (SCS) are apparently reaching down to the murky depths of this contentious waterway as Beijing readies its undersea surveillance network to consolidate its presence in the region.

Alexis de Tocqueville

Helping those who help themselves in Baton Rouge

- The Washington Times

America is a remarkable country, and sometimes it takes a disaster to remind us of how remarkable it is. The millions who indulge a little self-pity over having to choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton should look to Baton Rouge for another view.

Illustration on financing the rebuild of the U.S. military by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How to rebuild U.S. military might

In order to rebuild the U.S. military the next president is going to have to do the following things with the economy. The next administration must design a growth plan that will allow the U.S. economy to expand at a 3 percent to 6 percent rate per year. Only Donald Trump’s plan has the opportunity to do this. It can be accomplished by the following these important actions:

Illustration on the destructive effects of the $15 minimum wage by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More casualties in the Fight for $15

Wegmans grocery has “essentially” pulled out of a major planned expansion in Washington, D.C. It was reported last week that the decision factored in the city’s newly passed $15 minimum wage and other potential forthcoming labor mandates.

This Nov. 11, 2014, file photo shows the U.S. Capitol Building illuminated by the setting sun on the National Mall in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Breaking through the Washington gridlock

Elections in a democracy are by their nature unpredictable. However, it is as clear as day that whoever becomes the 45th president of the United States will be staring at a full plate of international crises, an economy that is growing slower than anticipated, and a generally dysfunctional and hostile relationship between Republicans and Democrats on and off Capitol Hill.

Illustration on Petraeus and a White House pardon by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

A pardon for Petraeus

Was something missing when, earlier this month, the White House announced that President Obama used his constitutional prerogative to put 214 convicts back on the street? Yes, we didn’t see a pardon for the person many Americans believe is the greatest general of his generation, David Petraeus.

Illustration on China as the chief supply source for heroin and methamphetamine pushed in the U.S. by Mexican drug cartels by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The China connection

The trail of poison that led to the death of rock star Prince and thousands of other Americans begins in China, which President Obama will visit on Sept. 2. According the State Department’s 2016 Narcotics Strategy Report, “China has become a hub for illicit drug consumption, drug and precursor chemical trafficking, and money laundering activities.”

Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States, had high favorability numbers throughout his time in office. (White house)

Not liking this Ike

You’d think a national monument honoring President Dwight Eisenhower would be a can’t-miss proposition. Unfortunately, the proposed design by architect Frank Gehry to honor the man who guided the Allies to victory in World War II is shaping up to be a failure.

U.S. Presidency for Sale Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The push proceeds toward oligarchy

Forget for a moment the pressing question of who is going to win this year’s presidential election. Think instead about a broader question emanating from this campaign year: Is American political power flowing inexorably to an entrenched oligarchy that is becoming increasingly impervious to popular sentiment?

Following the Reagan road

Donald Trump’s first quest for the presidency in a number of ways can be compared to the first foray into national politics of another revered Republican who similarly first was seeking the presidency: Ronald Reagan.

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Illustration on the need for Hillary to rest by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pause the campaign, Hillary needs a rest

This political campaign has already become too long and too arduous for the campaigners and the voters alike. Dare I say it? Politics as practiced in America is in danger of becoming a health hazard.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, addresses a gathering at a campaign rally Monday, Aug. 15, 2016, in Scranton, Pa. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Democrats' barriers to free speech

Democrats' grand plan for this election year doesn't seem to include free speech. The group that drafted the Democratic Party platform recently called for the Justice Department to prosecute energy companies that don't see eye-to-eye with Democrats on climate change.

Trump a tax genius?

After releasing her tax returns and saying that she and her husband had paid a 30-percent tax rate, Hillary Clinton tweeted, "Here's a pretty incredible fact: There is a nonzero chance that Donald Trump isn't paying *any* taxes."

Marine's discharge an outrage

It is fortunate that the Marine Corps was able to recognize Cpl. Monifa Sterling's workstation placards for what they actually were: a threat to discipline and good order ("Military court upholds Marine's bad conduct discharge over Bible verses," Web, Aug. 11). Cpl. Sterling could not be permitted to express her faith in such a blatant manner, and was apparently deemed unworthy of a modicum of common decency and consideration on the part of her supervisor.

Hundreds of civilians flee villages outside Mosul the day after Iraqi Kurdish forces launch an operation east of Islamic State-held Mosul on Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. The Kurdish forces known as the Peshmerga say they have retaken 12 villages in the operation in an effort to encircle the city. (AP Photo/Susannah George)

ISIS comes closer

The adage "the best defense is a good offense" is an old one and usually an accurate one. It's frequently invoked by sportswriters on the football beat, but it can apply to warfare, too. President Obama, a keen sports fan, nevertheless failed to understand this and now America's enemies are coming. Whether they can be stopped before they inflict further serious damage is a question we'll all see answered.

FILE - In this July 22, 2016, file photo, a hostess prepares for the G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting in Chengdu, in southwestern China's Sichuan province. China will propose a joint initiative to revive weak global growth at next month's meeting of leaders of Group of 20 major economies amid rising protectionist sentiment in the United States and Europe, officials said Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, Pool, File)

Bringing back 'stolen' jobs

The international economy is so interlocked that creating jobs in one national economy creates jobs in another national economy. That's why it's misleading to talk of the Chinese and other low-wage countries having "stolen" American jobs. It's not "just that simple."

How to Make Ethanol Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Two contending issues, both 'green'

It's easy to say that we can't put a price tag on a clean environment. But beyond this noble sentiment is a simple reality that radical "greens" prefer to ignore: Like any other area of policy, nurturing the world around us involves choices based on time, effort and, yes, money.

Charismatic, but egotistical and deceitful, too

Asked in March 1945 to name the greatest U.S. Army general of the war, 45 percent of the respondents named Douglas MacArthur -- far surpassing Dwight Eisenhower and Omar Bradley.

FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 27, 2014, file photo, a woman pays for merchandise at a Kohl's department store in Sherwood, Ark. A recent poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that two-thirds of Americans would have difficulty coming up with the money to cover a $1,000 emergency. But having a modest, immediately accessible emergency fund is critical to financial well-being. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)

Making welfare reform work

If anyone ever wonders why conservatives are skeptical of government programs, they should consider the War on Poverty. There are other examples, of course, but public welfare is a particularly apt one as we mark the 20th anniversary of the 1996 reform.

Illustration on the relationship of Putin and Erdogan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Putin marches on

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's recent meeting with Vladimir Putin in Moscow demonstrated clearly America's deteriorating position in both Europe and the Middle East.

Illustration on Mexican drug cartels' personnel needs and the recent release of thousands of drug offenders from U.S. federal prisons by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A boon for the drug cartels

The Mexican drug traffickers and their Chinese suppliers have a personnel problem.

Benefits of Free Trade Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for free trade

Do you support free trade? Many business people, politicians and workers say they are in favor of free trade, "but with conditions" -- because they can see and feel the job losses but not the job and income gains.

Illustration on past Liberal policy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What the past can teach us

While we shouldn't live in the past, we can certainly learn from it. We are not the first humans to walk the Earth, and yet too many, especially the young, suffer from the conceit that history is just a boring subject in school.

FBI Director James B. Comey. (Associated Press)

Life is just fairer to some than to others

- The Washington Times

Millions of Americans, mostly Democrats but a few sourball Republicans, tell pollsters and anyone who doesn't want to listen that they're preparing themselves to ignore the stink and shame of Hillary Clinton when they vote in November. They're advised here to prepare themselves for a protracted season of malaise and buyer's remorse.

Union Working Against Teachers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When unions march lockstep with Democrats

Summer is winding down, and teachers are readying their lessons for the upcoming school year. But America's largest labor union -- the National Education Association (NEA) -- is hatching another plan: to use teachers' union dues to elect Hillary Clinton.

Trump dangerous for America

There is an urgency facing this nation: Donald Trump is the Republican presidential nominee, but certain Republican leaders have failed to step up to the plate and address Mr. Trump and his followers. Republican leaders such as Sen. John McCain and House Speaker Paul Ryan are putting their love of power before country. And it's a shame, considering that they both clearly love America.

Better of two choices

American citizens should vote for Donald Trump. It's pretty clear that the Republican establishment is going all out against him. They're throwing the kitchen sink — and anything else they can grab — at him. They're attacking him, discrediting him and accusing him of all sorts of malfeasance. They're deliberately trying to turn the public against him.

FILE -- This undated image posted online on July. 28, 2016, by supporters of the Islamic State militant group on an anonymous photo sharing website, shows Syrian citizens gathered near burned cars after airstrikes hit Manbij, in Aleppo province, Syria. Syrian activists and state media said Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016, that at least 49 civilians, among them 5 children, have been killed on Saturday in Syria's contested Aleppo province as rebels and government forces traded indiscriminate fire across the region. Rebels and pro-government forces are battling for control of the northern metropolis, once Syria's largest city and its commercial capital. (Militant Photo via AP, File)

Extermination in Aleppo

An epic battle continues for control of Syria's largest city, once a rival of Cairo and Istanbul as a center of urban culture and civilization in the Middle East. Aleppo, once the Western terminus of the Silk Road from China, is swiftly becoming the latest symbol of man's inhumanity to man.