Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Pinocchio (Associated Press)

When the Big Lie becomes the legacy

- The Washington Times

Maybe the Christian thing to do is to cut John Kerry a little slack. He hit his head harder than the doctor thought when he fell off his bicycle in Switzerland.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump    Illustration by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Let Trump be Trump

Politics — and politicians in a democracy — are a true reflection of society’s virtues and faults at a given window in time.

Illustration on the dominance of the U.N in the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fantasists, bumblers and Iran

First the Obama administration denied that any secret side deals were made when they negotiated the agreement that they insist us will prevent Iran from producing and deploying nuclear weapons. Secretary of State Kerry assured us that it was a “fantasy” to believe there could have been a better deal, and the president said the only alternative is war.

Alternative delegate from Jean, La., Billy Durnley wears a large elephant buckle at the Republican National Convention, Tampa, Fla., Tuesday, August 28, 2012. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Creating a case for conservatism

Being conservative in a politically correct culture has never been easy. Whether you’re a politician trying to explain a controversial sound-bite, or a voter attempting to defend your stance on a hot-button issue to co-workers, you either grow a thick skin — or learn to keep quiet.

Illustration on ending taxpayer funding of Planned Parenthood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The moral terrorism of Planned Parenthood

Like many of you, when I first heard the undercover video of a Planned Parenthood official discussing in a detached and macabre manner the selling of aborted baby parts, I was physically sickened.

Illustration on the Obama Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Peace for our time’

Banner headlines in a prominent national newspaper read “NUKE DEAL PAVES WAY FOR NEW ERA: Sworn Foes U.S., Iran Aim To Bury Hatchet” — without sarcasm. For critics of the Iran nuclear deal, such undeserved praise is ominously reminiscent of the adulatory press that greeted British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and his ill-fated Munich agreement, upon returning from meeting Adolph Hitler in Nazi Germany on the eve of World War II, declaring, “Peace for our time.”

Illustration on the faults of the Federal public works funding bill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forging a highway funding fiasco

Later this week the highway trust fund officially runs out of money unless Congress authorizes more funding for roads and bridges. But the bill that is being pushed by Democrats and some Republicans is starting to look like a Republican Party Dunkirk that could infuriate conservative voters and even wind up costing the GOP the 2016 election.

Making the case for Main Street

By its very definition, the word “justice” equates with rightfulness and justness of ground or reason. That’s why the too-big-to-fail regulatory debate leaves me perplexed and concerned about the well being of this great nation.

Illustration on animal rights groups assault on Christianity by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Gospel according to PETA

The decline of Judeo-Christian values in the United States is a topic of concern that’s been analyzed greatly over the past decades. Less discussed is this: What if the left co-opts these values?

President Barack Obama speaks at the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution, in El Reno, Okla., Thursday, July 16, 2015. As part of a weeklong focus on inequities in the criminal justice system, the president will meet separately Thursday with law enforcement officials and nonviolent drug offenders who are paying their debt to society at the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution, a medium-security prison for male offenders near Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The mullahs rub some noses in Obama’s folly

- The Washington Times

The Iranians, having hornswoggled Barack Obama and John Kerry, are giddy with euphoria. Ordinarily the parties to an agreement would help each other sell it to the skeptical and the suspicious in their ranks, not least by keeping their traps shut. But not these guys.

Heavy Handed HUD Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Experimenting with failed socialism again

Remember busing, that brilliant social experiment that was to usher in a new era of racial utopia in America? Undaunted by the failed socialist experiments of the 1980s, the Obama administration has recently implemented a new Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) rule designed to “desegregate” housing by withholding funds from communities that fail to demonstrate their projects “affirmatively further” fair housing.

Illustration on family factors affecting U.S. employment by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why aren’t more Americans working?

Has America entered a “new normal” defined by lower economic growth and declining workforce participation? Some evidence may suggest that is the case, but a closer look reveals it is too soon to make that claim.

Illustration on the FDA labeling of Kratom as "dangerous" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An excuse for crushing kratom

Last year, Americans spent an estimated $374 billion on prescription drugs, up 13 percent from the year before. These drugs include OxyContin, Vicodin, Percocet and others that the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for sale without regard to their potential for abuse.

Related Articles

Russian Regulation of the Internet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Russia threatens Internet freedom

Beginning in September a new Russian law -- the Personal Data Law -- will require international Internet firms with Russian customers to process and store data about them on Russian servers.

Illustration on the panic around the use of antibiotics in livestock by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Manufacturing a food scare

The wisdom of crowds is a concept that has remarkable predictability. Often, the dispersed knowledge of millions of people making informed decisions is more reliable than the informed bias of policy activists.

BOOK REVIEW: 'A Murder of Magpies'

Anyone who has tried to write a book will relish this exuberant satire on the publishing business as portrayed by Sam Clair, an editor who has no illusions about her business.

Illustration on the deteriorating Hillary campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary tells a story

New questions emerged about Hillary Clinton's honesty this week over her bogus claim that she had never been served with a subpoena and had followed the government's rules on her emails.

Following a federal judge's decision Wednesday to cancel a half-dozen of the Washington Redskins' federal trademark registrations, public focus has returned to the team moniker and emblems. (Associated Press)

'Hail to the Redskins'

Why a few Indians, obviously envious of other ethnic minorities who get their names in the paper so often, are so dead to the celebration of courage and valor escapes us, but dead they are. The cheers roll down from the stands at FedEx Field, the martial strains of "Hail to the Redskins" float on the autumn air, and dead souls do not hear. The Washington Redskins unite a contentious city, a city riven with partisan anger and something close to hate, and dead ears cannot hear, dead eyes cannot see.

Clinton Gore campaign button

Hillary catches the 'inevitability disease' again

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton can write the book on the risks and dangers to inevitable presidents. She's been there, done that. She has her inaugural address written, revised and polished. She has stood before her mirror practicing her Churchillian thunder, updating Bubba's laundry lists of the things that must be done. She has viewed with alarm and pointed with pride. She's ready.

Illustration on the costs of the F-35 fighter plane by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The deadly F-35 strike fighter

America's military is being redefined but not by changes in strategy or evolutions of the threats we face. The redefinition is the unplanned result of budgetary constraints and bad choices of weapon systems we spend hundreds of billions of dollars to buy.

Government no longer 'of the people'

I have observed President Obama's actions and dictatorial power for seven long, long years. Now it seems we also have a Supreme Court that no longer decides cases based on constitutionality, but rather on the Justices' personal ideologies.

With potentially-explosive shipments increasing 40-fold in recent years as North American crude production booms, the railroad industry, at the urging of the Obama administration and safety officials in the U.S. and Canada, is considering a closer look at the risks posed by trains that now carry hazardous liquids through every region of the country. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

Liberate American oil

Forty years ago America was in a panic. The world was running out of oil. Cars lined up around the block at every gasoline station in town. President Nixon took a commercial flight to California, riding (first class) with the semi-ordinary folk, and leaving Air Force One in the hangar. Congress enacted a law prohibiting selling American oil abroad. Cheap oil was gone for good and America was resigned to kowtowing to the shieks of Arabia forever.

In response to a voter's question at a New Hampshire forum, Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush reiterated that "I honestly think we need to provide a path to legalized status, not citizenship, for illegal immigrants." Analysts say it is hard to pin down Mr. Bush on the immigration issue. (Associated Press)

Confident Republicans more satisfied with presidential field than Democrats

- The Washington Times

Republican voters appear to be more optimistic about 2016 than Democrats at this point. A whopping 71 percent of the GOPers report they are "satisfied" with the field of GOP candidates running for president - despite peevish critics who question the number of hopefuls who have thrown their hats into the ring. Only 57 percent of Democrats are satisfied with their respective line-up of candidates.

FILE - In this June 19, 2015 file photo, the Confederate flag flies near the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, S.C. The General Assembly returns Monday, July 6, 2015, to discuss what to do with the rebel flag that has flown over some part of the Statehouse for more than 50 years. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt, File)

Gallup poll: 67% of GOP, 27% of Democrats say it's OK for Southern states to fly Confederate flag

- The Washington Times

In earlier decades, a majority of both Democrats and Republicans said the Confederate flag was more a sign of Southern pride than of racism, and both groups were comfortable with Southern states flying the flag on state capitol buildings, according to a new Gallup poll. This is not the case anymore. There is a stark partisan divide in opinion between the parties, which a Gallup analyst attributes to a shift in the party makeup.

Sunni Alliance Destroys ISIS Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Sunni solution to ISIS

The year 2003 radically changed the geopolitical situation not only in Iraq, but in the Middle East in general. To counter the Bush administration's vision of a democratic Iraq, the Iranian and Syrian regimes responded by encouraging radical Islamic movements to thwart what they saw as an existential threat. Any democracy in Iraq threatened to destabilize the autocratic regimes in Tehran and Damascus, which also saw American military support of democratic reform as an immediate danger to their survival.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Churchill and the Generals'

Even if you've read umpteen books about Winston Churchill and even if you think you already know enough about the wartime leader's relationship with his generals, you may still want to read this book by a well-known British military historian.

bailout: Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (left) hopes to work out a rescue deal with European leaders to save his country's economy.

The impossible common currency

When the euro was first proposed and for some time after it became the currency, certain economists had pertinent questions (which some of the hosanna shouters thought impertinent): Could a common currency be possible for a group of countries which insisted on keeping their own individual economic, monetary and fiscal policies intact?

This photo provided by Discovery Channel shows a Great Hammerhead, one of the largest sharks in the world, during an episode of "Shark Week." The Hammerhead's strangely shaped head is part of an electrosensory system, helping it locate its prey. "Shark Week" returns Sunday, July 5, 2015, with 19 hours of prime-time programming including "Shark Island" with shark specialist Craig O'Connell, airing 8 p.m. EDT Sunday, July 12.  (Discovery Channel via AP)

No snacking in the surf

The water has never been the same since "Jaws," the 1975 movie starring a hungry great white shark snacking on beachgoers at the fictitious New England resort of Amity Island. The unexpected sight of a shadow in the surf -- real or imagined -- sets off a panicked flight atop the whitecaps to the safety of dry sand.

Illustration of Woodrow Wilson and the Treaty of Versailles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shades of Woodrow Wilson

It looks as though President Obama won't get an agreement with Iran by Thursday, one day before the time for Congress to review the controversial deal is extended from 30 to 60 days. The historic irony in this development is that on July 10, 1919, another president, Woodrow Wilson, was also determined to get a Capitol Hill approval on an equally controversial document, the Treaty of Versailles ending World War I, so much so that he personally appeared before the entire Senate.

Illustration on the increasing vulgarity of American women by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defining vulgarity down

Any man would tell you that women can't whistle, throw a pass or cuss very well. Female cussin' has punch but no authority. But the triumph of modern feminism is that a woman has the right to be as vulgar as any man. No, scratch that. It's not a right, but acceptance (in certain circles) for using verbal vulgarity as crudely as a barroom brawler. We used to call it "giving lip." It was not "ladylike."