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President Trump. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A boffo performance on the road

- The Washington Times

The Donald finally catches a break. His trip to the Middle East was planned weeks ago, long before the sacking of James Comey and the media transformation of the voluble sackee from goat to hero. The opportunity to get out of Dodge arrived just in time.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of May 23, 2017

Population death spiral

It is hard to succeed if everyone is leaving. Some of the former communist countries are suffering from a population death spiral, with double-digit population declines over the last 25 years, as can be seen in the enclosed table.

In this May 18, 1971 file photo, political consultant Roger Ailes, who died last week, is shown in his office in New York. From communications guru and TV producer to Chairman-CEO of Fox News Channel, Ailes' used a "fair and balanced" branding approach, targeted at viewers who believed other cable-news networks, and maybe even the media overall, displayed a liberal tilt from which Fox News delivered them with "unvarnished truth." Associated Press photo

The genius of Roger Ailes

Roger Ailes was no genius, not in the league of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. The founding chairman of Fox News Channel, who died last week from complications after suffering a fall, understood and respected Middle America from whence he came.

Illustration on the notion of government subsidy of nuclear power by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why nuclear power subsidies must end

Should utility bills and taxes be used to subsidize money-losing nuclear power plants so they can compete with renewable energy and low-cost natural gas?

Even the Walls have Ears Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A conversation with Condoleezza Rice

On Wednesday, I sat down with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to discuss her new book, “Democracy: Stories From the Long Road to Freedom.” The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.

Un-Happy Meal From High Minimum Wage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How a CEO misapprehends the minimum wage

Last week, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg made headlines for her Mother’s Day post calling for a minimum wage increase. “It’s long past time,” she claimed, “to raise the federal minimum wage.”

Seth Conrad Rich, a DNC staffer, was killed in July near his home in the District of Columbia. (Image via Rich's LinkedIn profile.)

The strange case of Seth Rich

- The Washington Times

This is the unfortunate story of the killing of a young man named Seth Conrad Rich, a Nebraska-born and -reared young man whose death by two gunshots has resulted in conspiracy theories of the worst kind.

Illustration on imprisoned felons on the voter rolls by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

The ACLU’s army of ex-cons

Not content with filing nuisance lawsuits all over the country, most of them aimed at thwarting the Trump administration, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is plunging into local political campaigns.

Illustration on Trump's potential effect on economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Moving toward 3 percent growth

President Trump’s economic team paints a rosier picture about what his policies could accomplish than the economics profession is willing to endorse.

Illustration on Iran's threat to an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An independent Kurdistan

In order to assist the creation of a Shia Crescent from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea, the question remains: Is Iran working to thwart the creation of an independent Kurdistan? Are they working together with Syria in order to further this strategic goal? According to an Iraqi source, Iran is working to thwart the creation of an independent Kurdistan by trying to instigate a civil war among the Kurds by supporting groups opposed to Masoud Barzani. They are doing this because they perceive Kurdish autonomy in Northern Iraq to be a threat and they view the internal divisions among the Kurds to be the most effective way to destroy the dream of an independent Kurdistan for the Kurds presently are not united.

Product of Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cry for me, Venezuela

I often say only half-jokingly to students on college campuses who are all in with Bernie Sanders that if they think socialism is such a wonderful economic model: how about a one-way ticket to Caracas?

Higher Temperature Readings Equal More Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Degrading Earth’s future climate

Best practice in science is achieved through a minimum of two critical conditions: humility and perspective. If humility and perspective are ignored, science suffers.

President Donald Trump smiles as he listens to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, speak during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Destroying Donald Trump is all that matters in the newsrooms of the mainstream media

- The Washington Times

Now anything goes. All restraints are loosened, all self-discipline trashed. There’s no cure or even treatment for Trump Derangement Syndrome, a disease as wild and as swiftly lethal as anything imported from the Ebola River valley of the dark continent. The rules and taboos that once guided even the sleaziest excuse for a newspaper no longer apply.

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The statuette portraying  newly elected French President Emmanuel Macron is on display in a shop at San Gregorio Armeno street in Naples, southern Italy, Tuesday, May 92017. Via San Gregorio Armeno is a street famous for its shops selling hand-crafted nativity scenes and all kind of painted figurines and statuettes. (Cesare Abbate/ANSA via AP)

The cyberthreat to democracy

Emmanuel Macron may have triumphed in France, but the massive hack designed to hurt his campaign at the crucial moment should be a real concern to anyone who treasures democracy.

Illustration on the Civil War reconsidered by President Trump      The Washington Times

Trump's take on the 'Uncivil War'

Leave it to President Trump to wake the populace. This time his alarm bell is America's slaughterhouse of 1861-65. "Why was there the Civil War? Why could that one not have been worked out?" he said last week.

Illustration on growing Trump strength by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Why Trump is stronger than he looks

To paraphrase Mark Twain: Reports of President Trump's political death "are greatly exaggerated." Simply scanning approval ratings overlooks the many trends determining a president's effectiveness and re-electability. Many of these favor Mr. Trump.

Illustration on phasing out ethanol content in U.S. gasoline by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Firing ethanol

President Trump has changed his mind on many issues since taking office -- China is no longer a currency manipulator and NATO is now an important institution. So there's still hope he'll dump the renewable fuel standard (RFS).

IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR GILLETTE - Gillette celebrates the launch of Gillette® On Demand on Tuesday, May 9, 2017, in Boston. Men won't have to choose between great value and great quality. Gillette On Demand is offering high-value trial incentives and loyalty rewards men will "fall" for, with subscribers receiving EVERY 4th order free. Credits awarded for each unique subscription plan and value will be equal to the lowest of previous 3 subscription orders, including taxes. (Scott Eisen/AP Images for Gillette)

The 'Made in America' tax myth

Are American-made products at a disadvantage to imported ones? That's the argument supporters of a 20 percent tax hike on imports are making to justify their position.

Illustration on fixing health care by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

The Senate's turn to ponder health care

As the Senate takes up the House bill to replace Obamacare, Republican control of Congress likely hangs in the balance. The health insurance market is about to collapse, and Republican senators must agree on a solution or face the wrath of angry voters.

Illustration on the state of leftist humor by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chaos and the commentariat

It is probably too early in our 45th president's tenure to evaluate how his critics are appraising him, both those on the left and those on the right. Among his critics on the right, such as Bill Kristol and George F. Will, their criticisms have calmed down a bit, and of course their criticisms are relatively chaste.

Illustration on The Muslim Brotherhood and Qatar by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Fooling many of the people much of the time

"Hamas Drops Call for Israel's Destruction," headlined The Wall Street Journal last week. The New York Times told its readers: "Hamas Moderates Talk on Israel." And the United Kingdom's The Guardian concluded that Hamas had produced a document likely to "ease peace process."

South Korea's presidential candidate Hong Joon-pyo of the Liberty Korea Party answers a reporter's question after voting in the presidential election at a local polling station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, May 9, 2017. South Koreans voted Tuesday for a new president, with victory widely predicted for a liberal candidate who has pledged to improve ties with North Korea, re-examine a contentious U.S. missile shield, and push sweeping economic changes. (Im Hun-jung/Yonhap via AP)

Travel for the brave and foolish

Travel can be broadening, but in certain places it can turn out to be confining, too. Travel to North Korea, one of the most dangerous places on earth, is particularly dangerous for tourists who don't pay close attention to the rules.

In this Feb. 10, 2017, file photo, then-National Security Adviser Michael Flynn sits in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The Russia-Rice mashup

Spending other people's money is the favorite pastime in Washington, but taking up the magnifying glass to follow the trail of mischief-makers, real and imagined, is a close second. The trail of Russian collusion, if any, with associates of Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential election has gone stone cold, but the investigation of the suspected Obama administration spying on the Trump team continues to turn up evidence. The trail is leading uncomfortably close to home.

Let losers lament

In the immediate aftermath of the most devastating loss in 240 years of presidential politics (a loss where the inevitable was trounced by the deplorable) Hillary Clinton went for a prolonged sojourn in the woods around her home, the same home where a private email server rested peacefully in her basement for years, gathering dust and state secrets.

Whither goest France?

The presidential election in France highlights the recent shift from a Europe of patriarchal nation states to an open border and a criminally tolerant, matriarchal form of government. This shift to matriarchy gained dominance following one of history's deadliest periods in humankind, one which ended in the slaughter of 50 million Europeans during World War II. Currently matriarchal rule supports open-border immigration, government nanny-state policies and social feminism.

In this Feb. 21, 2017, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to employees of the EPA in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

EPA, Interior pink slip moment a jolt of sanity

- The Washington Times

Outside agencies that have advised the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Interior on matters related to science for years have been handed pink slips of sorts in recent days. This is a real returning-to-sanity moment in American history

Undated handout photo of a parchment manuscript of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, believed to date from the 1780s and found in a records office in Chichester, southern England. Harvard University researchers say they've discovered a second parchment copy of the Declaration of Independence, The Boston Globe reported Friday, April 21, 2017. (West Sussex Record Office Add Mss 8981 via AP).

No, no, NO -- health care is not a right

- The Washington Times

Republicans on Capitol Hill, who hold the majorities in all the political power channels -- the House, Senate and White House -- are playing the Democratic game and talking about health care as if it's a right. When the heck did that happen?