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Joani Allen, an opponent of same-sex marriage, holds a sign during a rally at the Utah State Capitol Tuesday, April 28, 2015, in Salt Lake City. Supporters and opponents of same-sex marriage rallied in Utah on Tuesday after the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on the constitutionality of laws banning such marriages. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

More love and marriage ahead, American style

- The Washington Times

American ingenuity is the envy of the world, and why not? The exceptional nation may no longer be the workshop of the world — Americans drive cars built in Japan, wear pants made in Malaysia, shirts sewn in Burma, shoes cobbled in Canada and drawers, from petite to queen size, manufactured in China — but nobody makes excuses, takes offense quicker and nurtures hurt feelings longer than the Americans. Taking offense is the great American growth industry.

Illustration on Bill Clinton's monetary abuse of his status as former president by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Destroying the spirit of Cincinnatus

Looking back on the 500-year history of the Roman Republic, it can be seen that one sign of its decline was when its great leaders no longer toiled for their country but rather for themselves.

Moral compass illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The lying game

Will the next presidential election be won by a lie?

Illustration on GOP alternatives to Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A strategy for Obamacare after the Supreme Court rules

When the Supreme Court rules in the King v. Burwell case this summer, it will strike down Obamacare benefits in 36 states. That is because the Obama administration did not follow its own Obamacare law as passed by congressional Democrats and signed by President Obama.

Illustration on the damaging intrusions of the CFPB by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Government help that hurts instead

Last week the House of Representatives passed H.R. 1195, a bill that would create a small business advisory board to oversee the actions of the Consumer Financial Protections Bureau. While the bill is a small step in the right direction, President Obama has announced he is warming up his veto pen should the legislation reach his desk.

President Barack Obama speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Thursday, April 30, 2015,  before signing bill S. 535 Energy Efficiency Improvement Act of 2015. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) **FILE**

Economic stagnation returns

The Obama economy virtually stopped growing in the first three months of 2015 in another bleak sign of its persistent weakness over the last six years.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan discusses the budget debate in the final week of the state's legislative session during an interview in his office with The Associated Press, Monday, April 6, 2015, in Annapolis, Md. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

The Purple Line — money and myth

The recently ended Maryland General Assembly session was marked by vigorous budget debates — and ended contentiously over a mere $202 million of the state’s $40.7 billion budget. Yet another, far larger and more sweeping budget decision awaits Republican Gov. Larry Hogan. He alone must decide whether or not to proceed with the $2.45 billion Purple Line project, a 16-mile east-west light-rail train that will tax all Maryland residents largely to the benefit of a few wealthy land developers in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks in Washington in this March 23, 2015, file photo. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Hillary’s special deal

Contrary to what has been reported in The New York Times, the Clinton Foundation never agreed to stop raising money from foreign governments while Hillary was secretary of state. Money from foreign governments should have been off-limits. It risks the appearance that American foreign policy is up for sale. Her refusal to accept any limits on foreign fundraising in 2009, even when senators pressed her, red flagged what the Clintons intended to do. Her own words are damning.

Congress must approve any Iran deal

Today, there is no greater threat to U.S. national security than the prospect of a nuclear Iran. Led by theocratic zealots who have pledged to “annihilate Israel” and who regularly lead chants of “Death to America,” an Iran with nuclear weapons poses an unacceptably high risk of murdering millions of Americans or millions of our allies.

Hillary's health and our right to know illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary’s health and our right to know

We the people feel entitled to a president of the United States who is in good enough health so that he or she can endure the pressures of the job without suffering a heart attack, stroke or sudden death.

(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) ** FILE **

Courting gay marriage

Gay marriage is upon us because in many cases, voters of 37 states and the District of Colombia are saying, yes, let’s recognize the fact that gay people have the same right to be married as heterosexuals.

Related Articles

Iran deal bad all around

There is much to be concerned about when a tentative agreement reached by the P5+1 powers, at the urging of President Obama, allows retention of the most potent weapons Iran has. First, there is no limit on the terrorist actions of Iran, nor are there limits on its support of its involved allies, including Hezbollah, Hamas, Syria and the rebels in Yemen and Bahrain.

Menendez corruption only problem now?

Why has The Washington Times not covered in more detail the recent charges against Sen. Robert Menendez, New Jersey Democrat (New Jersey Sen. Menendez to face federal corruption charges: report," Web, March 6)? The Department of Justice has accused Mr. Menendez of corruption (i.e., accepting free airplane rides and other gifts from an old friend who needed help in securing some federal contracts).

Contained fighting could up U.S. security

Due to indecision by the Obama White House to support moderate Sunni rebels in Syria, Islamic terrorists in Syria (the so-called Islamic State) were able to reposition forces and attack the Iraqi army, which folded and abandoned its U.S. equipment, including many Humvees and 155-millimeter guns.

Illustration on restoring the American dream by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The exceptional thing the successful GOP candidate must say

The successful Republican candidate for president will have to be many things: fearless fighter, relentless advocate for conservative principles, articulate spokesperson for the forgotten middle class, a likable charismatic personality, expert on the complicated dynamics of foreign policy and national security strategy.

Scene from the movie "Little Boy"

'Little Boy': A classic modern film

There are classic films, like the ones on TCM and AMC, and there are modern films. There are few modern classics. "Little Boy," in theaters April 24, could be a modern classic.

Ethnicity mask illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The transracial nation

Not long ago, The New York Times uncovered the artifact that Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush had once listed himself as "Hispanic" on a Florida voter registration form.

Illustration on Obama's killing of Americans without due process by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Can the president kill Americans?

Can the president kill you? The short answer is: yes, but not legally. Yet, President Obama has established a secret process that involves officials from the departments of Justice and Defense, the CIA, and the White House senior staff whereby candidates are proposed for execution, and the collective wisdom of the officials then recommends execution to the president, who then accepts or rejects the recommendation.

Protecting the U.S. electrical grid illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting America in the dark

The recent temporary blackout in Washington that afflicted the White House, the Congress and interrupted a State Department press conference rightly provoked a spate of media commentary about the vulnerability of the electric grid to terrorist attack. The blackout reportedly was caused by a small explosion resulting from a malfunction in a transformer substation.

Turning a negative into a positive

There's a popular narrative in U.S. politics these days. The Democrats dislike the Republicans. The Republicans dislike the Democrats. The American voter dislikes the Democrats and Republicans for what they've done, and still do, to politics and elections.

Members of law enforcement and emergency services gather and a parameter created around the west front of the U.S. Capitol as the U.S. Capitol is on lockdown, Saturday, April 11, 2015, in Washington. Police say the U.S. Capitol is on lockdown as a precaution after shots were fired in what appears to be an attempted suicide. Capitol Police spokeswoman Kimberly Schneider says the suspected shooter was "neutralized" after sustaining a self-inflicted gunshot wound. It's unclear whether the man is dead. No one else is believed to be hurt.   (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

One nation under lawyers

It means that only a fraction of Congress – and of course, no one in the Oval Office – really knows health care, has experienced combat, or understands the ins and outs of balancing a budget.

Austin Bryant celebrates his victory at tether ball with Hogan Conder during recess at Marlin Elementary School in Bloomington, Ind.

When nanny runs amok

In the beginning there were good parents and bad parents. Then came "deadbeat dads," who didn't support their children. "Soccer moms" were (mostly suburban) mothers who spent a good part of their day getting their children to the playing fields on time. Then "helicopter parents" arrived, hovering over everything their kids did.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton takes notes during a roundtable with educators and students at the Kirkwood Community College's Jones County Regional Center, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, in Monticello, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Adventures in the Scooby van

The silly season begins, when nobody follows presidential politics but the men and women of press and tube who are paid to do it. Still, on her first venture out of the shadows we learned several substantial things about "the new Hillary." She stopped at a Chipotle on the highway south of Toledo, en route to Iowa, and nobody recognized her behind a pair of dark sunglasses. She lunched on a chicken burrito bowl (with guacamole) and when she pulled into her hotel in Pittsburgh she was not hungry for further fine dining, and ordered "Scooby snacks" from the room-service menu. She's traveling in an "upgraded" Chevrolet van, "approved" by the Secret Service, christened "the Scooby van."

Illustration on reformation for Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The case for Islamic heresy

By now, you should be familiar with the name Ayaan Hirsi Ali. You should know at least this much about her: She is brilliant, beautiful, black and she has been banned near Boston.

When sanctions work and when they don’t

At a time when once again, for the umpteenth time in postwar America, the imposition of economic sanctions and just how they should be applied is a hot-button topic in Washington's corridors of power, here comes this provocative book which seems to be telling us that using them is at best almost useless and at worst actually counterproductive.

Republicans breaking campaign promises illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The wimpy GOP Congress

Last November, Americans sent a stern message to President Obama and the Democrats when they delivered Congress to the Republicans. That's because Republicans made a lot of promises to them in the last election. Those commitments were instrumental to their victory; they were actions Americans were demanding and Republicans were vowing to deliver.

End of the IRS tax code illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The tax code at sunset

We are officially off to the 2016 races. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz was the first official candidate to enter the GOP primary contest, followed by Sens. Rand Paul and Marco Rubio. Many more will undoubtedly follow.

Hold Clinton accountable

As an independent voter, I voted for Bill Clinton the second time around. Back then I spoke out against the Republicans for unmercifully going after him for his sexual involvement with a White House intern. From my perspective the attacks were a detriment to the seat of the presidency and made the entire country look like a soap opera in the eyes of the world. That brings me to former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Tsarnaev deserves death

That Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was found guilty on all 30 counts was a foregone conclusion, about as much of a surprise as a harsh northeastern winter ("Dzhokhar Tsarnaev guilty on all 30 counts in marathon bombing, faces death penalty," Web, April 8).