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In this March 20, 2013, file photo, President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu huddle during their joint news conference in Jerusalem, Israel. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The occasion the Democrats asked for

- The Washington Times

The Democrats set out to teach John Boehner and Benjamin Netanyahu a lesson. They would boycott the Israeli prime minister’s speech to Congress and apply enough pressure to cancel the speech, keep Mr. Netanyahu at home and embarrass the Republicans who invited him here. What a happy day’s work that would be.

American Defense if Israel Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Standing with Israel in a dangerous world

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will address a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. Such an invitation is one of the highest honors we can bestow on a foreign leader. And such a speech is normally an occasion of unity in Washington, when elected officials put partisan politics aside and come together to focus on weighty issues of national security.

Failure to Protect Against Iranian Nukes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Iran goes nuclear

Our attention these days with regard to security is understandably riveted on the Islamic State, or ISIS, and its hideous decapitations, rapes and live immolations. We must deal with the Islamic State, but it is not the gravest threat we face. The Israelis are right — we should awaken to the fact that the coming of a nuclear Iran holds special dangers and requires particularly urgent attention. There are four driving reasons.

Obama Veto of Keystone Pipeline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Keystone XL pipeline veto

Experienced vote counters do not believe that either the House or the Senate will muster the two-thirds majority necessary to override President Obama’s veto of the Keystone XL pipeline bill. If so, Mr. Obama’s years of delay and disingenuousness on this issue, culminating in his veto, will guarantee negative consequences for America long into the future.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gestures while addressing the 2015 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington, Monday, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Standing with Israel

A world leader giving an address to Congress shouldn’t be controversial, especially when that leader is the prime minister of a major U.S. ally — indeed, a bulwark of freedom in a deeply troubled region of the world.

Attendees vote in the CPAC 2015 Straw Poll at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

CPAC then and now

A conservative reflects on the annual confab.

Illustration on the progressive tax structure by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Do the rich pay their fair share?

Suppose there were a banquet for 100 people and at the end of the night it was time to split the bill of $50 per person. If that bill were paid for the way we pay our income taxes, here is how it would work. Those in the top half of income would pay roughly $97 each and those in the bottom half of the income would pay an average of $3 each. Almost 40 people would pay nothing. And the single richest person in the room would cough up $1,750.

Illustration on the state of American liberty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

CPAC, freedom and saving the country

Attendees of last week’s Conservative Political Action Committee (CPAC), the nation’s largest conference for conservatives, heard a few tried and true conservative messages from potential presidential candidates and activists alike — calls for lower taxes, more freedom for business, a strong national defense, the importance of killing the enemy and the need for a serious foreign policy.

Illustration on continuing political and existential threats to Israel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Much ado about the wrong Israeli controversy

The brouhaha over Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s March 3 speech to Congress is diverting attention from more important U.S.-Israel controversies that will escalate soon after this comparatively minor contretemps fizzles out.

Illustration on patent protection by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent ‘reform’ is killing the right to invent

With the best intentions, and naively going along with the corporate world’s hugely financed publicity machine, Congress is about to stomp on America’s most creative citizens, its inventors.

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Killing industry with junk science

Back in 1995 I wrote a thesis titled "The CFC Ban: Is it Warranted?" refuting the notion that "global warming" was caused by man-made pollution. The global warming theory was based on the belief that chlorinated fluorocarbons (CFCs) would rise up into the atmosphere and reduce the level of ozone in the ozone layer, causing holes in the ozone. Well, I wasn't the only one who debunked that theory, because CFCs are three to four times heavier than air and may never make it to the ozone layer. You no longer hear scientists mention these theories.

Illustration on the preservation of presidential homes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A window into a president’s soul

Having held Thomas Jefferson's seat in the House of Delegates, living for two years in a converted shed on Mount Alto-Brown's Mountain overlooking Monticello, marrying my wife, Susan, nearby at James Monroe's Ash Lawn, and now living on land that was once a part of George Washington's Mount Vernon plantation, I have seen how historic properties can be subdivided and developed, thereby altering the experience and sense of a personal understanding of important history.

Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber kisses his fiancee, Cylvia Hayes, after he is sworn in for an unprecedented fourth term as governor in Salem, Ore. Kitzhaber announced his resignation Friday, Feb. 13, 2015, amid allegations Hayes used her relationship with him to enrich herself.  (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)

More rain in Oregon

Times have been tough for Democratic governors. Republicans in November ousted Democrats in Maryland and Massachusetts, both blue-state strongholds, and now another Democratic governor, this one in Oregon, where the election results can't get a deeper shade of blue, is out. The influence-peddling scandal that took him down further threatens his fiancee and the reputation of a major donor whose billions are beloved by Democrats.

Terror Stress Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fear of ISIS attacks the heart

Fear of the Islamic State is even worse than ISIS itself. Terror breeds worry — a cruel beheading and a heroic pilot who is burned alive in a scene of public torture creates a tidal wave of public stress; many millions are horrified and worry they could be next. Video images amplify this worry, and stress hormones soar. When we are anxious we don't sleep well, which extends the cycle of worry into the following day.

How conservatives trump the pity party

William Voegeli's "The Pity Party: A Mean-Spirited Diatribe Against Liberal Compassion" is required reading for all political animals.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

The hogs squeal

Losing is no fun, in baseball, football and particularly in politics. Maryland's Democrats, who have been in a surly mood since losing the statehouse to Larry Hogan in November, might better have followed the example of Davy Crockett to relieve their anger and frustration. When his Tennessee constituents threw him out of Congress after only one term, Davy told them: "I'm going to Texas, and you can go to hell."

Trust the Inupiat to preserve Alaska's environment

The Inupiat Eskimo has lived on Alaska's North Slope for countless generations — unknown to the outside world. Our culture, social structure and our survival depended on our ability to utilize the abundant resources that bless our region.

Spies, operatives and cyberspace

Robin Hood used bows and arrows to right what he saw as wrongs. Peregrine Montresor, the protagonist in "Lazarus Man," uses cyberspace.

Upcoming fashion is unisex - with androgynous colors and progressive designs, says the industry color adviser. (Image from Pantone)

Unisex returns: 'Androgynous' colors, progressive design dominate upcoming fashion

- The Washington Times

It's not 50 shades of gray quite yet. Just in time for New York Fashion Week comes this news from Pantone - the industry organization which sets professional color standards for all design industries: "The fall 2015 palette is rooted in multi-faceted, androgynous colors that can be worn to portray effortless sophistication across men's and women's fashion; it is the first time we are seeing a truly unisex color palette," says Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute.

Victims of the Fort Hood shooting will soon be eligible to receive the Purple Heart, with Congress pushing ahead with a policy change that would officially recognize domestic terrorism as an issue, rather than the "workplace violence" designation the Obama administration had used. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Reality in purple

The lady with the scale of justice makes a belated appearance in Washington. The victims of the Fort Hood massacre are finally to receive their due. They're due as well an acknowledgment by the commander in chief that they were the prey of terrorists. We're not holding our breath, and neither should they. President Obama continues to hide in a game of words.

Illustration on Gov. Rauner's measures in Illinois to make payment of public-sector union dues voluntary by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Taking back government from union bosses

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner's executive order on Monday freeing public-sector employees from paying mandatory dues creates a crack in the public union monolith responsible for Illinois' fiscal woes. That's also good news for taxpayers.

Finally transparent — on terror strategy

I just read President Obama's request for the use of military force ("Obama's military force proposal 'utterly stupid,' says Orrin Hatch," Web, Feb. 11). After creating chaos in Iraq and Libya, Mr. Obama now wants to micromanage the war on the Islamic State. Notably he removes the threat of a sustained ground effort by American forces. Such valuable information normally is sought by enemy spies. Mr. Obama gives it to the world.

Remembering Kayla Mueller

The life and death of Kayla Mueller at the hands of the savages of the self-proclaimed Islamic State has touched the civilized world ("Obama vows retribution against Islamic State for Kayla Mueller death," Web, Feb. 10).