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Illustration on unconventional war by Linas Garsys/The Washington Tmes

Winning an unconventional war

War is — and always will be — hell. The Law of Armed Conflict is not meant to change that — only to make it a little less hellish. There are weapons you agree not to use. In exchange, your enemy doesn’t use those weapons against you. You treat captured combatants humanely. You expect the same when your soldiers are taken prisoner.

Draining Military Morale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The military’s malaise

There’s a cloud of malaise worthy of Jimmy Carter that has settled over the nation’s military. The man who should be able to clear away the cloud, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, won’t be able to do anything about it.

This image provided buy the Library of Congress shows an artists rendering of the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. (Associated Press)

Historical loops of presidents and wars

This Presidents Day, when we commemorate the past and present leaders of this country, it’s also a time for Americans to reconsider the patterns of American power through our history and consider where they want the pattern to continue as we get ready to elect a new leader into office.

Illustration on the mediocre U.S. economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

An economy mired in mediocrity

For seven years, President Obama’s economic recovery has been all “faux” and no “go.” The one thing America elected him to do in 2008 — restore the economy — still remains effectively undone as growth continues to be lackluster. It has become clear that when it comes to America’s economy, he takes a uniquely fatalistic approach to its performance.

Illustration on the relationship between Hillary Clinton and Goldman Sachs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pinned to Wall Street

When Goldman Sachs, the powerful, multibillion-dollar Wall Street investment bank, offered Hillary Clinton $675,000 for three speeches, she readily accepted.

Spiro Agnew Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Spiro Agnew shaped Republican rhetoric

Spiro Agnew today is what he characterized himself as in 1968. Richard Nixon tapped the unknown governor of Maryland to be his Republican vice presidential running mate: “not exactly a household word.”

Duplicitous attacks on the Maldives

It is a compelling tale. A longtime political activist leads his party to victory in a closely fought election in a country famed for its pristine archipelagos and on the front of the war against climate change. There is no doubt that Mohamed Nasheed, the former president of the Maldives, was adept at using the international media to promote his agenda while in government.

A student teacher in the second-grade classroom of teacher Susanne Diaz at Marcus Whitman Elementary School, goes over lessons with students, in Richland, Wash. (Ty Beaver/The Tri-City Herald via AP)

Let no child be left unconfused

- The Washington Times

Mae West, the famous philosopher of the boudoir, would hardly believe her fortune today. “So many men,” she once complained, “so little time.” She was the kind of girl who set out to “climb the ladder of success, wrong by wrong.”

Illustrations on Christians and Yazidis in Syria and Iraq by Lians Garsys/The Washington Times

Forsaken for their faith

It’s now a couple of weeks of news cycles since we learned from satellite imagery that the Islamic State had destroyed the monastery of St. Elijah, which for more than 11 centuries served as a spiritual oasis for the promulgation of Christianity in the Middle East.

Cost of Ethanol on the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Renewable Fuel Standard deceit

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants Americans to pay more for their groceries. That’s the only way to explain the agency’s decision to mandate the use of corn-based ethanol in our gas supply.

Changing Campaign Financing Rules Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

An alternative to nonstop political fundraising

America’s campaign finance laws are often a convenient scapegoat for all of our country’s ills. Witness Democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders invoking campaign spending in response to seemingly every other debate question.

Illustration on bad teachers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Teachers who can’t teach

Anew study in the New England Journal of Medicine has a surprising conclusion. It finds that over the past decade, 1 percent of physicians accounted for 32 percent of malpractice claims. In other words, health care providers could eliminate one-third of malpractice and its associated health, legal and economic costs by removing the worst 1 percent of doctors.

GOP Talent Pool Fading Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The disappearing governors

The Iowa caucuses may have only muddied the waters in the presidential race, but they almost definitively decided one thing: the next president will not be a governor. That’s an amazing revelation because just one year ago all the smart money was betting that the next president would be a Republican governor.

Illustration on U.S. development of reusable rockets by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A dangerous partnership with Russia

It is with a terrible sense of deja vu that I find myself again warning American lawmakers about our reliance on Russian rocket engines to loft military satellites. For more than a decade, America’s workhorse rocket, the United Launch Alliance’s (ULA) Atlas V, has been powered with RD-180 engines imported from Russia.

Comparing Abortion to the Holocaust Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How abortion dehumanizes everyone

Over 50 years ago, Adolf Eichmann, the architect of Nazi Germany’s machinery of death, was executed by hanging after his 1961 conviction by an Israeli court.

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TRUMP Poster Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Not Trump

When the publisher of National Review, Jack Fowler, called and asked me to write 300 words on why I oppose Donald Trump for president of the United States, my first thought was about the derision that was sure to come from Trump supporters.

Illustration on the history of human suffering under socialism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Socialism means coercion

Do you know what socialism is? Hillary Clinton struggled to find an answer when recently asked. Socialism is a system in which the government owns or controls the means of production, and allocates resources and rewards.

In search of solutions

Whether you're liberal or conservative, it's usually easy to say what you oppose. Both sides spend a good deal of time trying to shoot down policies from the other side. But do you know what you favor?

This Sept. 19, 2013, photo, shows the sign of a Wal-Mart store in San Jose, Calif. A National Labor Relations Board judge says Wal-Mart Stores Inc. unlawfully disciplined workers who staged protests in May and June of 2013 and ordered the retailer to reinstate 16 former employees, as well as give them back pay. The decision, posted on the labor board’s website late Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, arrived one day after the nation’s largest private employer said it was giving raises to most of its hourly employees. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Breaking the business model

Wal-Mart announced this month that it is closing 154 stores in the country, the biggest retrenchment in its history. The retail giant, whose earnings have come under pressure in recent years, also revealed that it is scrapping plans to open two new supercenters in Washington D.C.'s poorest neighborhoods.

Ben & Jerry's co-founder Ben Cohen has created a new ice cream flavor to honor Sen. Bernie Sanders. (Ben Cohen) ** FILE **

Ben & Jerry's co-founder creates ice cream flavor to honor Bernie Sanders: 'Bernie's Yearning'

- The Washington Times

They were there when Sen. Bernie Sanders announced his candidacy for president last year. And they're back to campaign for the Democratic hopeful in their own style. Ben & Jerry's ice cream founders Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield have gone to Iowa to talk up the 74-year-old, self-described socialist among voters at multiple events. Mr Cohen in particular took it upon himself to make an extremely limited edition ice cream flavor after the candidate - "Bernie's Yearning."

Immigrants from El Salvador and Guatemala who entered the country illegally board a bus after they were released from a family detention center in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

When foreigners bring disease across the border

When facing the massive problems associated with an open border, deluges of illegal immigration, and now even government sponsored surges of so-called "refugees," we naturally must discuss our concern about terrorism and violent crime. That, however, is only part of the threat.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Fault Lines'

It does not surprise me that the British author David Pryce-Jones titled his amazing memoir as he did. To him, his long life (he will turn 80 in February), has involved a series of attempts to bridge the contradictions in his heritage and in the eclectic consistently admirable distinctive career he has pursued as novelist, biographer and journalist.

Illustration of Forrest McDonald by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Remembering Forrest McDonald

- The Washington Times

Forrest McDonald, perhaps the greatest student of the American founding, passed away late last week at the age of 89. His scholarship and work have had more impact on the understanding of the intellectual and historical context that produced the Constitution and the creation of the United States than most people appreciate.

Flawed polling in 2016 race?

Pundits across the political spectrum have expressed bewilderment at the 2016 presidential race. The entire campaign seems to have slipped down the rabbit hole to some surreal political wonderland. Inevitable winners are losing. Hillary Rodham Clinton is suddenly not liberal enough and Jeb Bush is too liberal. The feminist candidate is being called a woman basher.

Former Attorney General Eric Holder pauses as he speaks at the Justice Department in Washington to discuss the Aug. 9, 2014, shooting in Ferguson, Mo. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

A racket in the chicken house

Some of the chickens of Eric Holder, the former attorney general, and President Obama are fluttering over the chicken house again, looking for the roost. One of those chickens, as persistent as a tough old Dominecker hen, is the Holder scheme called "Fast & Furious."

Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas speaks during a campaign stop at the Freedom Country Store, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016, in Freedom, N.H. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

For the love of Christ

Evangelical Christians have a passion for spreading the good news of the Gospel of Jesus Christ "to the whole world," and that's a wonderful thing. This passion has led Christians of various denominations to build hospitals, found colleges and universities, establish orphanages and educate the poor and impoverished.

Leave God in schools

"Kicking God out of school" (Web, Jan. 10) tells the disturbing tale of the legal director of the New Jersey chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union calling on Glenview Elementary School in Haddon Heights, N.J., to stop saying "God bless America," in honor of first responders and victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Jan. 25, 2016

What the economy needs now

Everyone's blaming the oil price collapse and China's sliding economy, for the rout of the stock market these first two weeks of 2016. That's part of the story, but there may also be a policy explanation for the bearish sell-off.

Career Intermission Program Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Soldiers on sabbatical in the private sector

While opening combat arms roles to female soldiers garnered the most publicity last month, minimal attention has been given to the Army's decision to grant talented soldiers an opportunity to take a brief "intermission" in their military service to pursue opportunities in the private sector.