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Donald Trump (Associated Press)

The Donald tries out for the team

- The Washington Times

Now even Donald Trump is taking himself seriously. He’s trying now to be colorful without being reckless, careful not to be rude when he doesn’t have to be, and playing less the showboat and more like someone trying out for the team.

Illustration on Hillary's redacted classified emails by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton redacted

It is clear by now that a large number of Hillary Clinton’s emails that she sent or received on her private computer system contained classified information.

Illustration critical of Saudi Arabia's human rights record by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Confronting Saudi repression

Of all Washington’s embarrassing friends, few are more troubling than the king of Saudi Arabia, who will meet President Obama on Friday.

Criticism of Azerbaijan by the United States Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Misrepresenting Azerbaijan

Over the last several years, the Republic of Azerbaijan, widely acknowledged and praised for its commitment and pursuit of religious tolerance, has become a target of harsh criticism by the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIF).

Behind the Eight Ball Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Blaming white racism for violence

Last week, reporter Alison Parker and photojournalist Adam Ward — both white — were murdered in cold blood on television by Vester Lee Flanigan, a black man.

Obama Legacy: Ex-patriots Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How expatriates are forging an Obama legacy

The State Department recently announced that a record number of Americans in 2014 gave up their citizenship and decided to live elsewhere. Last year’s figure of 3,415 was a 14 percent increase over the previous record, 2,999, in 2013.

Illustration on the National Zoo pandas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What the ‘Save the Pandas’ campaign reveals

For years, the National Zoo has come under fire, including in a blistering 2013 Congressional report over gross negligence, a scathing 2004 National Academy of Sciences report into animal deaths at the zoo and, somewhere in between, an investigation revealing that the zoo had disposed of some wild animals by sending them to a canned hunting outfit and to a petting zoo.

Laws Protecting Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When comprehensive legislation is counterproductive

The announcement by the House Republican leadership that the Innovation Act (H.R. 9) will not be scheduled for a vote this summer has the bill’s supporters concerned but not yet alarmed.

Illustration on the one percent and the American dream by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The American Dream lives

The American Dream couldn’t be more alive but there are those promoting class warfare who are certainly trying to kill it off. A recent Gallup poll (May 2015) shows that 63 percent of those polled feel that wealth and money should be more evenly distributed in America.

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Illustration on the greater value of African trophy hunting by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The necessity of hunting

The Spanish philosopher, Jose Ortega y Gasset, wrote: "One does not hunt in order to kill; on the contrary, one kills in order to have hunted."

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy speaks during a news conference with U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (right), on Aug. 13, 2015, along the Animas River Trail in Berg Park in Farmington, N.M. (Jon Austria/The Daily Times via Associated Press) ** FILE **

Big government as the new Terminator

Social observers from Aristotle and Juvenal to James Madison and George Orwell have all warned of the dangers of out-of-control government. Lately, we have seen plenty of proof that they were frighteningly correct.

Illustration on the possibility of Iran's rejection the Obama arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

If Tehran turns down the nuclear deal

Whether congressional Democrats accept or reject Barack Obama's Iran deal has great importance and is rightly the focus of international attention.

Book review history check

In his otherwise accurate and, I'm pleased to note, very positive review of my latest book, "Last to Die: A Defeated Empire, a Forgotten Mission, and the Last American Killed in World War II," Joseph C. Goulden writes that I "suffered severe wounds in Vietnam" ("Remembering the last American to die in World War II," Web, Aug. 16).

Illustration on parallels between Warren G. Harding and Bill Clinton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Titillating talk about Harding recalls Bubba's hanky-panky

That 1920s predecessor of President Bill Clinton has again been in the news, and in a big way. Last week the media resounded anew with delightful reports of President Warren Gamaliel Harding's nigh unto maniacal attraction to women, or at least to some women, during that period of American history that became known as the Roaring Twenties.

Illustration on Hillary's private server by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The foibles of front-runners

In all the campaign polls conducted this year, one is more revealing than any other — finding that just one in four Americans are satisfied with our nation's direction.

Solar Straw Hut Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rethinking the solution for poverty

Pope Francis's Laudato Si encyclical on Earth's climate and environment is eloquent and passionate. It is also encumbered by platitudes and errors.

Floodwater from the rising Muskegon River flows over South River Drive in Newaygo County's Bridgeton Township on Wednesday, April 16, 2014. (AP Photo/The Muskegon Chronicle, Ken Stevens)

Restoring fairness to federal land seizures

One of the best-known constitutional guarantees, certainly among landowners, is the right to "just compensation" when the federal government seizes "private property" for "public use."

EMP Graphic to accompany Woolsey article of Aug. 19, 2015

A Shariah-approved nuclear attack

Congress must stop President Obama's nuclear deal with Iran. The most important reason -- Iran can threaten the existence of the United States by making an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack using a single nuclear weapon.

Illustration on the relative safety of oil transport by pipeline by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The safety factor in moving Canadian crude

Debates over oil pipelines seem to be never-ending. The quintessential example being that of the Keystone XL pipeline, which has languished in regulatory limbo for more than 2,500 days.

'Likeability' won't save U.S.

I am now reading that even though Donald Trump is leading the polls owing to his concern for the issues important to Americans and his proposals for dealing with those issues, those who like him say they wouldn't support Mr. Trump in the general election. This is because his "likeability" is lacking.

Taney upheld the law

The three aldermen from Frederick, Md., who voted to expel the bust of Chief Justice Roger Taney from their city hall should review Taney's role in Maryland and U.S. history.

'No' to closing Guantanamo

President Obama is pleased with himself for his diplomatic opening to Cuba. The rest of us wouldn't be pleased with what he wants to close. The president's long-standing goal of shuttering the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay appears to be advancing apace.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernard Sanders is gaining more attention from potential voters in Iowa and New Hampshire due to his straight-shooting style and social agenda. (Associated Press)

When curiosity takes a vacation

Curiosity, not ideology, is the mark of the best reporters, but with the disappearance of tough editors reporters are allowed to be pundits, and it shows. The best reporters are on the scout for "the story." The early story of the 2016 presidential campaign is the emergence of two unlikely, unusual and off-brand candidates, and how the reporters treat them.

An American classroom in early fall. (AP Photo/The Alpena News, Paige Trisko)

Crisis in the schools: GOP hopefuls told to set rhetoric aside during upcoming education summit

- The Washington Times

It could be the first serious dialogue they have on the U.S. school crisis. A half dozen Republican presidential hopefuls bustle into Manchester, New Hampshire on Wednesday for the 2015 Education Summit, and organizers hope they leave their standard talking points in the campaign bus and have an "urgent conversation" about the failing state of American schools.