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Illustration on Memorial Day by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Showing America’s gratitude

Orderly rows of white headstones line national cemeteries throughout our country. Each bears a name and behind that is a story of sacrifice. Today, a grateful nation remembers, but there is more we can do.

Illustration on remembering the sacrifices of U.S. Special Operators by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why special operators’ families must be remembered

Memorial Day is set aside for us to remember those who have fallen in defense of our country. This year’s observance should remind us that too many of us pay too little attention to the war that erupted on 9/11 in which Americans are still fighting, and sometimes dying, in many places around the world.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk from Marine One across the South Lawn to the White House in Washington, Saturday, May 27, 2017, as they return from Sigonella, Italy. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

No, Trump didn’t cause Obamacare to fail

It’s finally official. Obamacare is a public policy flop of epic proportions. That’s the only possible conclusion from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City announcement last week that it will drop out of many markets in Kansas and Missouri.

Karen Clarkson, of Fairbanks, Alaska, kneels and cries at the grave of her son U.S. Army Sergeant Joel Clarkson on Memorial Day at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Monday, May 28, 2012. (Rod Lamkey Jr/The Washington Times)

The bitter history of Memorial Day

It used to be called Decoration Day and was observed on May 30. Today it’s commonly known as Memorial Day and is celebrated on the last Monday in May, mostly to give Americans a long weekend. But it used to be a solemn remembrance of the nation’s war dead — by decorating graves with spring flowers.

Former US President Barack Obama is awarded the German Media Prize 2016 in Baden-Baden, Germany, Thursday, May 25, 2017.(AP Photo/Michael Probst)

The latest news from the president in exile

- The Washington Times

The government in exile — the real one, according to the media — has had a busy week at home and abroad. “President Obama” has given up leading from behind and presumes now to lead from overseas. His secretary of state has a new mission, as missionary to the safe places where snowflakes fall.

Illustration on Obama's Labor Board legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the Obama labor board majority

Elections have consequences, or at least they are supposed to. Unfortunately for the rights of independent workers who don’t want to associate with a labor union, more than 100 days have passed since Barack Obama left office, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) remains in the hands of an Obama majority intent on pushing the limits of Big Labor’s forced unionism powers. It doesn’t need to be that way.

Illustration on Confederate soldiers buried in Arlington Cemetery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Memorial Day must honor all of America’s fallen

As president of the American Veterans Center, the organization that produces the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington D.C., I am sometimes questioned as to why we include Confederate reenactors in our timeline of American military history.

Illustration on tax reform by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for tax and entitlement reform

Lobbyists are out in full force to block genuine tax reform. If Congress bends, great harm will come to ordinary folk — fewer good-paying jobs and a federal government too strapped to care for seniors and the truly needy.

Illustration on Trump's "Russian' problems by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Possible crimes and cover-ups

In his first four months in office, President Trump has achieved the dubious distinction of being investigated by an independent prosecutor and at least five major oversight committees in Congress run by his own party.

FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, one of the remaining cows on Alabama farmer David Bailey's farm, walks towards a pile of hay to be fed, surrounded by dirt where ankle deep green grass use to be, acceding to Bailey, in Dawson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

What’s the cattlemen’s beef? Washington

- The Washington Times

David Cook is a cattleman, a rancher and a member of the Arizona State House. He’s no Beltway insider. Mr. Cook came to Washington this week to spell out his beef. In short, he wants Congress to stop trying to lasso other ranchers and rural Americans with regulations.

Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

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In this Feb. 5, 2016, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks from the balcony of the Ecuadorean Embassy in London. Two media reports say U.S. prosecutors are preparing or closely considering charges against the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks, including  Assange, for revealing sensitive government secrets. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File) **FILE**

Seth Rich, killed DNC staffer, emailed WikiLeaks? Ruh-roh

- The Washington Times

Rod Wheeler, a former homicide detective with the Washington, D.C., force -- whose face was made famous while serving as a television pundit during the O.J. Simpson trial -- offered up some interesting news about the recently murdered Democratic National Committee staffer Seth Rich that went like this: He was "absolutely" emailing WikiLeaks. Ruh-roh.

People protest the appearance of Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, in Berkeley, Calif. The University of California at Berkeley is bracing for major protests Wednesday against Yiannopoulos, a polarizing Breitbart News editor, on the last stop of a tour aimed at defying what he calls an epidemic of political correctness on college campuses. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

At UCSC, throw the black activist bums out!

- The Washington Times

Radical black students who are part of "The African/Black Student Alliance on the University of California's Santa Cruz recently stormed one of the campus buildings, tossed out staffers and set up camp, announcing intent to stay unless their list of special interest demands were met. So why were they rewarded, rather than expelled?

Chart to accompany Rahn article of May 16, 2017

The problem of European divergence

Despite the attempts to unify Europe into an economic and partial political whole over the past 70 years, the grand experiment is unraveling, and it increasingly looks like the Humpty Dumpty we call Europe cannot be put back together again. Parts of Europe are enjoying unparalleled freedom and prosperity, but other parts are sinking both economically and politically. What explains the growing divergence?

This handout photo released by the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, shows President Donald Trump meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 10, 2017. The Washington Post is reporting that Trump revealed highly classified information about Islamic State militants to Russian officials during a meeting at the White House last week. The newspaper cites current and former U.S. officials who say Trump jeopardized a critical source of intelligence on IS in his conversations with the Russian foreign minister and the Russian ambassador to the U.S. They say Trump offered details about an IS terror threat related to the use of laptop computers on aircraft.(Russian Foreign Ministry via AP)

Paying a price for presidential insults

During an interview last June in his New York office, I asked Donald Trump about his use of language that many considered insulting and divisive. "Will there be a pivot for you from the primaries to the general election campaign?"

Unfair Competition Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ensuring 'Open Skies' still flies

As President Reagan's former transportation secretary, it's gratifying to see Washington is finally finding the gas pedal when it comes to infrastructure. We all have seen the cost of poor infrastructure, slowing down both us and U.S. businesses. But while we work ourselves out of a backlog of technology, concrete and steel problems, it's also time for Congress and the administration to cast a critical eye toward the operational risks facing our infrastructure.

Illustration on the urgency of dealing with the North Korean threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Writing a new chapter in the saga of North Korea

After nine years of a conservative government, the South Korean people have elected a progressive Democratic Party president, Moon Jae-in. There is significant media speculation about President Moon, the former chief of staff of former President Roh Moo-hyun, and whether he will pursue another Sunshine Policy of reconciliation with North Korea.

Illustration on the selection of the next director of the FBI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Turning the FBI fiasco into a victory

- The Washington Times

CBS "Late Show" host Stephen Colbert, a major league anti-Trump media star, was taken aback when, upon hearing that FBI Director James Comey had been fired, his audience broke into cheers and wild applause.

Illustration on cutting loose from the Paris climate agreement by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Deep-sixing the Paris Agreement

You wouldn't think Al Gore and Donald Trump would have much to talk about, given their political divisions. Yet that's exactly why the former vice president recently got in touch with President Trump: to urge him not to withdraw from the Paris Agreement.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 4, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) ** FILE **

In search of a really, really big catastrophe

- The Washington Times

If you're a Democrat, lost in a restoration fantasy of taking over the Congress next year, now is the time to dream big. Reality, with its talent for smashing the fanciful, will arrive soon enough.

Illustration on the pay gap issue by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The credibility gap on the pay gap

Some myths never die. Like Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster, the executive and gender pay gaps continue to deceive.

When tragedy becomes mystery

Do not confuse this cracking good detective story with the currently available ghost story, "Lincoln in the Bardo," which I am neither reviewing nor reading.

Putin had more to gain with Hillary

Why would have Russian President Vladimir Putin have wanted to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election? I contend that if Hillary Clinton had won, Mr. Obama's failed policies would have been continued just as though Mr. Obama had had a third term.

President Donald Trump pauses while meeting with Abu Dhabi's Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Monday, May 15, 2017, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington.

A not-so-neutral decision

"Net neutrality" is often misunderstood, but it's an issue that arouses passion on both sides of an important issue. One of President Trump's first appointments was Ajit Pai as the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, which imposed "net neutrality" in the Obama era, and Mr. Pai and conservatives generally want to reverse that decision.

Trump's Truman moment

In 1948, when President Truman recognized the newly independent state of Israel, he did so in the face of fierce opposition from his advisers. Secretary of State George C. Marshall -- whom the president regarded as "the greatest living American" -- adamantly opposed the decision.

In this Wednesday, May 10, 2017 file photo, protesters rally outside the town hall held by New Jersey Republican Rep. Tom MacArthur in Willingboro, N.J. Americans vented some frustrations this past week in Republican districts crucial to GOP majority control of the House, sounding off about health care and President Donald Trump's abrupt firing of FBI Director James Comey. Republicans in some districts faced a backlash over their votes for the House health care bill at raucous town halls, with plenty of complaints about a provision that would allow insurers to charge seriously ill customers higher rates if they let their coverage lapse. Other lawmakers avoided holding forums. (AP Photo/Michael Catalini)

Goodbye to Comey, and all that

The dogs bark, but the caravan moves on. James Comey has moved on, too, and even the loudest dogs are moving on to the canine duty of barking after President Trump as he selects the Comey successor as director of the FBI.