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President Trump (Associated Press)

No hot date for the Nerd Prom

- The Washington Times

Guess who’s not coming to dinner, and probably a good thing, too. Neither Donald Trump nor the not so loyal opposition can be trusted to sup together without sharp elbows, sneers and insults. Before the second bottle of wine is uncorked, the hard rolls (and most years the rolls are really hard) would be flying across the tables.

Illustration on President Trump's "disruptive" approach to governance by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

Rebooting the new Trump presidency

President Trump is off to the rockiest start of any modern president. He faces remarkably well-organized opposition from liberal activists, who refuse to accept the outcome of the election, but his biggest problems are bad management, staffing and questionable strategic decisions at the White House.

Illustration on funding the border wall with seized illegal cash by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ready billions for the wall

Sometimes the obvious just needs to be said. Official Washington is bellyaching about the cost of President Trump’s “wall,” intended to protect the Southwest border. Some put the cost at more than $20 billion. So be it. Beyond contraband and illegal immigrants coming north, something goes south: cash. Simply put, these illicit proceeds, counted in the tens of billions, would easily pay for the wall — time to say so.

Illustration of Qassem Suleymani by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Crimes of Qassem

He might not be a household name in America — at least, not yet. But throughout the Middle East, Qassem Suleymani makes the righteous and the innocent tremble.

A New Jersey State Police cruiser leaves Trump National Golf Club, Friday, Nov. 18, 2016, in Bedminster, N.J. President-elect Donald Trump is expected to arrive at the golf club on Friday. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Criminal civil forfeiture

Living in a free society brings benefits, but also responsibilities. One of the most important is keeping an eye on government. You never know when lawmakers will try to do something bad — or something that seems good initially, then goes spectacularly wrong.

Illustration on Taiwan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China, Taiwan and an important anniversary

This year Beijing will stand in solidarity with Taiwan and commemorate the 70th anniversary of the “228 Massacre.” On Feb. 28, 1947 Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek’s Kuomintang (KMT) security forces stopped Lin Jiang-mai, a Taiwanese widow, for illegal cigarette sales. The KMT officers confiscated Mrs. Lin’s cash and wares. They struck her on the head repeatedly for resisting.

Healthcare Industry Dependence on Obamacare Finances Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When hospitals resist change

Most Republican health care proposals include Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). People like them because they reward healthy lifestyle choices and careful, cost-conscious use of health care resources. When we are advised we need to get a MRI, we ask “when?” and “where?” but hardly ever, “what does it cost?”

Chart to acompany Moore article of Feb. 27, 2017

Pleading poverty, demanding new taxes

Stop me if you’ve heard this story before. Governors and state legislators are pleading poverty again and they are demanding tax hikes of every imaginable kind. More than half the states are facing big deficits this year and they are mostly blue states like California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois and New York and Oregon. (See chart.) These are the highest tax states with some of the deepest pools of red ink. There’s got to be a message here.

Illustration on trump's international policy attitude by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Trump Doctrine

The United States needs a grand strategy to guide its foreign policy. The Trump Doctrine should announce boldly that America is back in the world leadership business and that it stands resolutely for peace. America should call out countries that threaten world peace and form military alliances with their neighbors to confront them.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. With Trump are Michelle DeLaune, center, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and Dina Powell, right, White House Senior Counselor for Economic Initiatives. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trumpspeak, a language rich in adjectives

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump isn’t the carrier of the disease that threatens the language, but he suffers with enthusiasm. His abuse of the adjective might eventually threaten his foreign policy.

Illustration on immigration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘I am an immigrant’

I have a Masters in International Relations, speak four languages and served as a politician in my country, the Republic of Georgia. I am also an immigrant.

Playing the xenophobic card

- The Washington Times

Last week, The New York Times detailed President Donald Trump’s press conference, and wrote: “A Jewish reporter got to ask Trump a question, it didn’t go well.”

The Genesis of Despicable Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Being a ‘deplorable’

Who among us can’t at some point relate to what it feels like to be an “irredeemable deplorable,” a term coined in the heat of a campaign but with far greater implications now. Whether we are religious or not, whether we pray or not, whether we are political activists or not, many of us know what it feels like to be mocked to the point of less than “other” status.

Related Articles

How presidents have responded when disaster strikes

Tevi Troy, CEO of the American Health Policy Institute and former deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and White House aide, tells us he "spent most of the first decade of the 21st century working in the executive branch of the U.S. government dealing with disasters."

Illustration on the inner workings of reporters by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Toward better relations with the press

Before becoming a newspaper columnist I was a broadcast news reporter for local TV stations and occasionally appeared on the NBC radio and television networks. I have some experience at being on the receiving end of hostilities directed at the media.

Failure to Maintain the Oroville Dam Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hype-driven disasters

It can be dangerous to believe one's own or others' hype. A couple of weeks ago, 180,000 people living downstream from the nation's highest dam, the Oroville Dam in California, had to be evacuated because the dam's main and emergency spillways were damaged due to heavy rainfall and runoff.

Oscar statue (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: A bad night for Oscar

That's quite a hangover Oscar is still nursing, two days later. The motion picture academy tried to give him away to the wrong winners, and the academy posted a tribute to a Hollywood icon no longer with us with a photograph of someone else who is still very much with us. One of the performers was hit on the head by a prop. One thing followed another.

Tom Perez (Associated Press)

Democrats lunge left

Keep turning left and you'll always come back to the place where you started, or a dead end. Neither result seems to bother the Democrats. The party of Jefferson chose its leader over the weekend, Tom Perez, who prescribes more of what brought the party low. Striking out toward the dead end, Democrats will need more than a wing and a prayer to survive and prosper.

McMaster not fit for security role

The president's new national security adviser, Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, does not believe that radical Islam is the root cause of Islamic terrorism. Because of this I urge President Trump to discharge his latest selection to the position and replace him with former ambassador John Bolton.

Illegals not solely to blame

While it is refreshing to see that President Trump is seeking to take the enforcement of our immigration laws seriously, it should be noted that the just and equitable enforcement of those laws requires the recognition of an important fact. Many of those who have furtively entered our nation have been encouraged to do so by the sporadic or lax enforcement of our immigration laws by previous administrations.

President Donald Trump speaks at a dinner reception during the annual National Governors Association winter meeting Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Majority of Americans believe press is too hard on Donald Trump: Poll

- The Washington Times

A little more than half of Americans believe the mainstream media is too harsh on President Trump -- and why wouldn't they think that? The majority of the articles appearing in the press are largely critical of the new president -- and they're not limited to the national news sections of the major papers.