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Illustration on diffusing conflict with Qatar by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Bringing Qatar back from open conflict with its brothers

The dispute between Qatar and its Arab neighbors hurts everyone involved. Qatar had agreed to cooperate with the other governments including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. Instead, they are involved in a boycott that verges on open warfare.

GRAY: Congress needs to step up oversight in 2014

Christmas came early to the executive branch this year, thanks to Republicans in Congress. They gave the Obama administration a yearlong Christmas present: benign neglect.

Illustration: Big Government by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

MILLER: Pay cut for bureaucrats

- The Washington Times

Those with a government job are sitting pretty. A typical fed’s total compensation averages 16 percent more than that of his neighbor at an equivalent private-sector gig. In this troubled economic time of 8.5 percent unemployment, nothing beats the public dole’s 100 percent job security.

President Obama speaks on Friday, Dec. 16, 2011, during the 71st General Assembly of the Union for Reform Judaism at National Harbor in Oxon Hill. (Associated Press)

MURRAY AND BIER: Avoiding a lost decade

- The Washington Times

Remember Japan’s “lost decade” of the 1990s? For the United States, 2011 was the “lost year.” Congress and President Obama are engaged in a standoff that will see 2012 go the same way unless they both get out of the way and let the private economy grow.

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PRUDEN: Laughter drowned in sorrow

If, as certain wise men are saying, Barack Obama's Syrian deal with Vladimir Putin will die of a thousand cuts, somebody with a knife had better get busy. Four or five slices have been taken out of the deal already, and the carcass looks like it could already use a transfusion. It won't last for a thousand cuts, or even a dozen.

President Barack Obama salutes at Andrews Air Force Base before departing for Columbus, Ohio, March 6, 2009. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

PRUDEN: Obama's war with no name

The passive is never the voice of a leader. What plain folk asked to go to war crave is plain speech delivered with passion, a leader who says what he means, means what he says, and says on Tuesday what he said on Monday.

PRUDEN: The government keeps no secrets

Murder will out, as the Bard reminded us (and Chaucer before him), and a lot of other uncomfortable truths will out, too. That's what the NSA revelations are all about, and the IRS abuse, the spying on journalists, and the betrayal and cover-up at Benghazi. The government is populated by human people, and human people can't keep secrets.

Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

PENDLEY: A long anti-drilling tradition

Most Americans are familiar with the economic and energy miracle that is the use of hydraulic fracturing to unlock an incredible wealth of natural gas and oil all across the country. The Barnett, Haynesville, Fayetteville, Marcellus, Utica and Niobrara, as well as the Bakken and Eagle Ford, deposits are producing energy, providing jobs and pumping billions into the nation's economy. They have one feature in common: Only state and private lands are involved despite the fact that federal lands constitute a third of the country.

EDITORIAL: Crushing school choice

The White House has taken Louisiana's poorest schoolchildren and crushed their hopes for a better future. Citing rules meant to end racism, the Justice Department last week asked a federal judge in New Orleans to slam shut the door on minority kids, ensuring they remain trapped in failing schools.

EDITORIAL: Showdown in Syria

War fever is exciting, thrilling even, and it's contagious. Where it stops, none can tell. Prudent presidents go slowly, keeping all options open, measuring their response twice to cut it once.

EDITORIAL: Who needs Congress?

On her way out the door Tuesday as Homeland Security chief, Janet Napolitano lamented the failure of Congress to enact the Dream Act. It's not clear why it matters to her, considering the Obama administration has been acting as if a path to citizenship for illegal-alien youths had already passed through the legislative process.

EDITORIAL: A spy's regret

As the actress Jennifer Aniston once said, "There are no regrets in life, just lessons." Given recent developments, some members of Congress must be having second thoughts about their support for the National Security Agency's domestic spying operation. They now have their opportunity to show that they've learned their lesson.

EDITORIAL: Yet another bailout

In Greek tragedy, the main character overestimates his abilities and brings ruin upon himself and his family. European politicians share this fatal pride, thinking they can continue borrowing from future generations without consequence. Their latest extravagance is a third bailout for Greece.