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Illustration on diffusing conflict with Qatar by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Bringing Qatar back from open conflict with its brothers

The dispute between Qatar and its Arab neighbors hurts everyone involved. Qatar had agreed to cooperate with the other governments including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. Instead, they are involved in a boycott that verges on open warfare.

GRAY: Congress needs to step up oversight in 2014

Christmas came early to the executive branch this year, thanks to Republicans in Congress. They gave the Obama administration a yearlong Christmas present: benign neglect.

Illustration: Big Government by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

MILLER: Pay cut for bureaucrats

- The Washington Times

Those with a government job are sitting pretty. A typical fed’s total compensation averages 16 percent more than that of his neighbor at an equivalent private-sector gig. In this troubled economic time of 8.5 percent unemployment, nothing beats the public dole’s 100 percent job security.

President Obama speaks on Friday, Dec. 16, 2011, during the 71st General Assembly of the Union for Reform Judaism at National Harbor in Oxon Hill. (Associated Press)

MURRAY AND BIER: Avoiding a lost decade

- The Washington Times

Remember Japan’s “lost decade” of the 1990s? For the United States, 2011 was the “lost year.” Congress and President Obama are engaged in a standoff that will see 2012 go the same way unless they both get out of the way and let the private economy grow.

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Illustration Homosexual Agenda by John Camejo for The Washington Times

EDITORIAL: Tolerance in San Antonio

The First Amendment took a hit in San Antonio last week, but the Constitution is still breathing. The San Antonio City Council voted to consider a city ordinance disqualifying anyone who believes homosexual conduct is wrong from serving, ever, on a municipal board.

** FILE ** Steven Rattner, former head of the Obama administration's task force on the auto industry, delivers the keynote address on the auto bailout at the National Press Club in Washington in October 2009. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)

EDITORIAL: Bailing out Hockeytown

If it was good enough for General Motors, it's good enough for Detroit. That's the message Steve Rattner, who was President Obama's automobile-bailout czar, is peddling as a television talking head and op-ed essayist for The Wall Street Journal.

Robert James Cummiskey from Chesterfield, Missouri, a U.S. veteran who fought in the Korean War, right, carries a wreath of flowers with South Korean Army soldiers during a ceremony to mark the 60th anniversary of the Korean War at the Imjingak Pavilion in Paju near the border village of Panmunjom, the demilitarized zone that separates the two Koreas since the Korean War, north of Seoul, South Korea, on Thursday, June 24, 2010. During the war, the United States and 15 other countries fought alongside South Korea under the U.N. flag against North Korean and Chinese troops. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

EDITORIAL: The Forgotten War

More than six decades have passed since North Korean tanks rumbled across the 38th Parallel into South Korea on a quiet Sunday morning - June 25, 1950 - and set off another war just five years after the end of World War II.

** FILE ** Rep. Darrell E. Issa, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Indulging the wastrels

House Republicans and Senate Democrats are squabbling over the Internal Revenue Service budget for next year, and a disinterested observer (if there are any) would expect them to be fighting over who could be roughest and toughest on the agency.

Illustration by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

EDITORIAL: The Obamacare canaries

Thirty-five House Democrats broke party ranks last week to vote for a Republican bill to delay the employer mandate in Obamacare. They're the canaries in the coal mine, and everyone knows what President Obama thinks of coal.

President Barack Obama speaks about the economy, Wednesday, July 24, 2013, at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill. Seeking to focus public attention on the problem he was sent to the White House to solve, Obama is making a renewed push for policies to expand the middle class, helping people he says are still treading water years after the financial meltdown. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

EDITORIAL: Christmas in July

President Obama, the retailer-in-chief. Who knew? He's making a series of speeches on the economy over the next few weeks to revive flagging interest in himself, if not the economy, stealing, sort of, from retailers who hold "Christmas in July" sales as the attention of shoppers is drawn to the attractions of summertime.

** FILE ** President Obama pauses as he speaks at the daily news briefing at the White House in Washington on Friday, July 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

RAHN: Obama's bad news for blacks

- The Washington Times

If you knew nothing else about President Obama other than looking at the data, you might conclude that he was insensitive to blacks, given that they have done far worse economically under his administration than Hispanics or whites.

Illustration by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

KUHNER: Turning up the volume

- The Washington Times

Race relations have deteriorated dramatically under President Obama. Both whites and blacks agree: the racial divide has increased over the past several years. The reason is simple.

Christine O'Donnell

EDITORIAL: The 'sinister force,' afoot again

The government war against Republican conservatives gets curiouser and curiouser. It's not just the IRS, but a state government, too. The link between the IRS pursuit of Christine O'Donnell and the state of Delaware's snooping through her federal tax records may be just a coincidence, but color us suspicious.