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Illustration on the adverse impact of five years of Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shreds of doubt about Obamacare

Last week’s tax-filing deadline was a little bit more complicated than in the past, thanks to Obamacare.

Illustration on Hillary and money questions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary’s hurdles

Nearly four months into the two-year presidential election cycle, Hillary Clinton is running into deep trouble on several major political fronts.

Wind mills work atop the mesa near Sterling City, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

Financing Climate Crisis, Inc.

The Obama administration is using climate change to “fundamentally transform” America. It plans to make the climate crisis industry so enormous that no one will be able to dismantle it, even as computer models and disaster claims totally lose credibility — and even if Republicans control Congress and the White House after 2016.

Parking lot rant illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Where to find America’s aristocracy

Notwithstanding what the Marxist whim-wham artists have been telling the youths of our country for over a generation, there has been little sign of a true aristocracy in America. For a very short period of time something like an aristocracy appeared during the era when the Robber Barons plied their arts, but it did not last.

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Where love of freedom led another Nabokov

Composer Nicolas Nabokov was four years younger than his far more famous novelist first cousin Vladimir, but was perhaps as talented artistically and more admirable in character.

George Washington   From a portrait by Gilbert Stuart

The body politic grows soft and fat

- The Washington Times

The Founding Fathers tried to warn us about runaway partisan outrage, but they didn't listen to themselves. We've been paying for it ever since. Now there's not much we can do about it.

The Washington Times celebrates the U.S. Constitution 227 years after ratification. (VIDEO screenshot) ** FILE **

Recovering ‘Our Lost Constitution’

Finding Americans fed up with governmental abuses isn't hard. They wonder why we have politicians who spend too much, bureaucrats who regulate too much, and officials who limit our freedom at almost every turn.

Illustration on the IMF's chronic misunderstanding the causes of economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hammering global growth with faulty monetary policy

This past week, the International Monetary Fund again lowered its global economic forecast for 2015. From 2003 to 2007, real global growth in gross domestic product averaged more than 5 percent, but during the last five years it has averaged less than 3 percent. During the last six years of both the Reagan and Clinton administrations, real GDP growth averaged more than 4 percent in the United States, but growth has averaged only a little over 2 percent since the recession bottomed out in 2009.

Illustration on failed civics education in the nation's schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Flunking civics means apathy reigns

It's an old joke, but one that is a commentary on our times. A pollster asks: "What do you think about the level of ignorance and apathy in the country?" The person replies: "I don't know and I don't care."

Better credit card protections

Protecting Americans from online threats is clearly taking a rightful place at the top of Congress' priority list, evident in the celebration of "Cyber Week" through Friday and the pending introduction of long-anticipated cybersecurity legislation.

The Civil War and the generals who fought it

For serious historians of the Civil War, William C. Davis is the ultimate go-to source for reliable information on a conflict that spawned a staggering amount of mythology. He is the author of more than 50 books on the war and the South, and until recently was director of the Virginia Center for Civil War History at Virginia Tech.

Putin outwits Obama on Iranian missile deal illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Putin undermines the Iran deal

Vladimir Putin's decision to lift Russia's embargo on the sale of surface-to-air missiles to Iran is a reminder that we have to walk and chew gum at the same time. While we engage in the political self-absorption that consumes us for two out of every four years, we can't afford to ignore nations such as Russia and Iran, especially when they act in concert.