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Illustration on giving thanks for the American military by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Grateful for American muscle

We Americans have much to be grateful for. Every year we gather together with friends and family to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday. When we do, we should be grateful as well for the service of the American military in far-flung outposts.

Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen answers to the House Oversight Committee in the panel's continuing probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the government's tax agency, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Earlier this month, IRS official Lois Lerner was called to testify about the controversy but refused to answer questions by committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and invoked her Fifth Amendment rights at least nine times. Associated Press Photo

Impeach IRS chief John Koskinen

After revelations that the Internal Revenue Service was restricting political speech and targeting conservative and tea party groups, John Koskinen was appointed to head the agency, promising reform and transparency.

The monument to General Gouverneur K. Warren at Gettysburg     The Washington Times

A Thanksgiving message in bronze

In the fall of 1865, America marked its first Thanksgiving since the end of the Civil War. Seven months earlier, after Robert E. Lee had surrendered on April 9, the North held a spontaneous jubilee. Cannons boomed, fireworks illuminated the night sky, bands played, people sang in the streets and crowds cheered the savior of the Union, Abraham Lincoln.

Religious Roots of Thanksgiving Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Proclaiming a day of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the time when America’s religious roots and traditions are publicly displayed. While we think of feasting at tables filled with food and drink, and imagine the Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony inviting neighboring Indians to join them to celebrate a plentiful harvest, Thanksgiving Day has a much more religious meaning. It was not uncommon in the 17th and 18th centuries for individual colonies to set aside days for prayers of gratitude to our Lord.

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BOOK REVIEW: 'The Main That Got Away: The Life and Songs of Harold Arlen'

Perhaps it is because songs are called by the name their lyricist has given them that their composers sometimes seem to be less-known than the wordsmiths. Unless, of course, when they have been part of an indelible duo that has somehow entered the lexicon of musicals, like Rodgers and Hart, or Kern and Hammerstein, or after Kern and Hart dropped off, that rare successful remarriage Rodgers and Hammerstein.

"Freedom From Want" by Norman Rockwell          Associated Press photo

Finding more than faults on the all-American holiday

Has anybody seen Norman Rockwell? We gather together for the Thanksgiving holiday and a few days of family togetherness. The tables are groaning under time-honored dishes of our Pilgrim forefathers, or so we like to think. We tell innocent stories about them and their Native American guests (or "Indians," as the first settlers called them.)

Separation of Church and State Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

John Kasich's bad idea

Conservatives are supposed to be against big government and opposed to the left's belief that problems can and should be solved by Washington.

Illustration on the emergence of a tyrannical government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What to be thankful for?

What if the government's goal is to perpetuate itself? What if the real levers of governmental power are pulled by agents, diplomats and bureaucrats behind the scenes? What if they stay in power no matter who is elected president or which political party controls Congress?

Illustration on Thanksgiving Day by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

An exceptional holiday of exceptional America

There are two particularly quintessentially American holidays: Independence Day, when we celebrate our declaration of independence from the British, which began the most successful experiment in human liberty. And Thanksgiving, when we offer appreciation for the wondrous blessings in our individual lives and in the life of the nation.

The Approval of Technical Wrong Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the gun-ignorant make gun laws

When the state of Maryland quietly killed off its 15-year, $5 million social experiment in gun control -- so-called "ballistic fingerprinting" -- it served up the latest example of people who know nothing about firearms making technical laws about guns. The news of this latest failure (not a single crime solved in 15 years) followed New York shutting down a similar program, and it generated from gun owners and gun makers a tired "We told you so."

Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon           Associated Press photo

A military witch hunt that almost succeeded

Along with many Americans, I salute The Washington Times for having the courage to not only report on the Air Force general court martial persecution-prosecution of Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon, but to continue following this case with a series of updates from the courtroom trial in Minot, N.D., until the court martial concluded on Nov. 14.

NATO Safe Area for Refugees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Responding to humanitarian catastrophe

The international community just celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Accords, a landmark peace agreement that brought an end to the Bosnian War and a grave humanitarian crisis in the Balkans.

BOOK REVIEW: 'American Dreams: Restoring Economic Opportunity for Everyone'

Political polls, although increasingly iffy and unreliable, have become a growth industry, with the national media, caught up in a relentless wave of cutbacks and downsizing, routinely using them as primary sources for stories -- a practice no editor would have countenanced not too many years ago.

Illustration on the processing of national security intelligence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to presidential campaign advisers

This memorandum is addressed to the brave souls advising presidential candidates. As you know, the recent terrorist attacks in France -- and in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Israel -- have altered the political landscape. With less than a year to go before the 2016 election, the landscape may stay altered even if there are no more attacks -- and that seems unlikely.

Illustration on the need for streamlines conceal carry permits in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/the Washington Times

Fighting ISIS with concealed carry

Following the recent Paris attacks, the Islamic State recently announced its intention to "strike America at its center," in Washington, D.C. Our response should be swift and decisive.

The Battle for Israeli Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The return of a 47-year-old headline

I was thumbing through an old magazine over the weekend. It was 47 years old to be exact, and I came across a surprisingly prescient piece entitled wittily, "The Arab, the Jew, and the Pickle." What particularly caught my eye was that the piece was written by me in what is now called The American Spectator. Imagine that.