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Wising up to the Democrats’ war on women

In June, Rep. Cory Gardner, Colorado Republican, told a roomful of friends at a Cory Gardner for Senate get-together that he was surprised to see his Democratic opponent, Mark Udall, running ads accusing him of banning birth control — since he had just picked up his wife’s birth-control pills. Everybody laughed.

Face-to-face with an evil enemy

There can be only one response to the barbaric beheading of American journalist James Foley by Islamic State terrorists. We must hunt them down and kill them.

Remembering Washington in flames

The most famous firestorm to strike Washington, D.C., took place 200 years ago, when an uninvited, uniformed guest plopped into the speaker’s chair in the U.S. Capitol’s House of Representatives chamber on Aug. 24, 1814.

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BOOK REVIEW: 'The Care and Management of Lies'

She wrote letters that transported men living in the shadow of death in the French trenches to the fragrance of a kitchen in Kent.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Thunder at Twilight'

This is one of those books that are as interesting for the way they read in perspective as for their intrinsic merits. American novelist Frederic Morton is a native of Vienna and his nonfiction works about it are without peer for their insight into its unique qualities.

Tough Pill to Swallow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to slow the pace of medical progress

The Americans infected with the Ebola virus appear to be improving — very welcome news, especially given the virus's death rate, which is estimated to be as high 90 percent.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Russian Roulette'

In November 1917, soon after his Bolshevik faction seized control of Russia, Lenin called on the "oppressed masses" of Asia to follow Russia's example and throw off colonial rule.

Bogart and Bacall in "To Have and Have Not."

'Death be not proud'

Robin Williams and Lauren Bacall join this year's roster of celebrity deaths. Their names and fame preoccupy us in public mourning, though most of us were no closer to them in life than to a movie or television screen.

NATO Alliance Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

As NATO withers, whither NATO?

As world leaders gather for the NATO summit in Wales during the first week of September, they'll need to do some collective soul-searching on the alliance's future.

Expensive Government Music Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A higher scale for music royalties?

Members of Congress are being pressured by lobbyists, songwriters and music-publishing executives to pass legislation artificially forcing copyright royalty rate increases on music.

Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol is surrounded by media after meeting with protesters Monday, Aug. 18, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer has touched off rancorous protests in Ferguson, a St. Louis suburb where police have used riot gear and tear gas. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Media mantra misses the story as Ferguson explodes

Much of the media mantra in Ferguson, Missouri, followed a simple storyline. An 18-year-old black, known to his friends and family as a "gentle giant," planned to attend college the following week. As he walked down the street with his friend around noon Saturday, Aug. 9, he met a police officer who gunned him down as he tried to surrender with his hands held high.

In this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, United Airlines Flight 175 collides into the south tower of the World Trade Center in New York as smoke billows from the north tower. (AP Photo/Chao Soi Cheong)

An ominous post-9/11 warning

Two recent interviews have been the topic of lively debate within the so-called "foreign-policy community."

Gun-grabber Bloomberg's epic fail in Milwaukee

Billionaire Michael R. Bloomberg could learn a thing or two from the biblical story about an Israelite soldier named David, who went up against Goliath, a giant of a man and a powerful foe.