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Centennial High School senior Doyle Trout, left, and his classmates react as his childhood and high school photographs appear on the screen during the senior slide show during graduation on Saturday, May 16, 2015. Trout, a four-time state wrestling champion who lost his left leg in an accident, is going to the University of Wyoming on a wrestling scholarship. Wyoming is honoring Trout's scholarship, and he hopes to wrestle again someday but doing that won't be easy.(Francis Gardler/The Journal-Star via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; KOLN-TV OUT; KGIN-TV OUT; KLKN-TV OUT

What I know: advice for the real world

Make the face you show the world—in interviews, on the job, socially and professionally—the reflection of what’s in your heart and mind.

Paula Jones smiles during a news conference in Dallas, in this April 16, 1998, file photo. Encouraged by an outside lawyer, Paula Jones is ready to insist on $2 million, half from President Clinton and half from a New York tycoon, in exchange for dropping her sexual harassment lawsuit, two legal sources involved in the case said Saturday, Oct. 17, 1998. (AP Photo/LM Otero) ** FILE **

Paula Jones: Reprise of a famous bimbo eruption

- The Washington Times

For the Republicans, worthy or not, Hillary and Bubba are the gift that keeps on giving. Whoever is responsible for writing the thank-you notes has a big job ahead. The dynamic duo keep a network of warehouses just to house and keep track of the gifts. No wonder Hillary needs her own Internet server.

Illustration on the move to remove Andrew Jackson from the twenty dollar bill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The cheap currency of judging historical figures by today’s standards

New York Times columnist Gail Collins is on a tear. Her sense of civic rectitude oozes from her prose. Her characteristic breezy haughtiness is on full display. The moral imperative that has caught her fancy and led to two columns in as many months: Getting that angular-faced Andrew Jackson off the $20 bill and replacing him with a woman, preferably an African-American or American Indian.

Illustration on Net Neutrality by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New rules make the Internet’s future look very 20th century

Like a thief in the night, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently denied eight separate petitions requesting the agency delay the implementation of new Internet regulations while they are challenged in court. While the late-afternoon news dump and decision was predictable, it is no less disappointing that the Internet will soon be subjected to 20th century telephone monopoly-era regulations.

Related Articles

BOOK REVIEW: 'Our Souls at Night'

Kent Haruf died at the end of last year, leaving behind one final tale. It's set, like all his previous novels, in the fictional town of Holt, Colorado. Titled "Our Souls at Night" and just published, it will thrill aficionados of his earlier books and hook readers new to his work with simple yet concentrated language that gorgeously evokes the lives of its central characters Addie Moore and Louis Waters.

U.S. Trade through Thailand Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

U.S. will find a cooperative ally in Thailand at the Asia Security Summit

Asia will be all ears this weekend when Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter speaks on the Obama administration's policy of rebalancing American relations at the Asia Security Summit in Singapore. For the United States to achieve its shift toward Asia, it will need strategic partners. Thailand is so strategically placed to be such partner.

(AP)

The nanny state sets its sights on the stogie set

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is finalizing regulations that could ban the sale of most of the cigars currently available in the United States. The FDA last year uncorked a 241-page, 70,000 word barrage of proposed restrictions on the sales and marketing of tobacco products. Some congressmen are pushing back against the agency, but it is unclear whether cigar smokers can escape the nanny-state's sacrificial altar.

Section 215 Not Fitting the Patriot Act Puzzle Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving the Fourth Amendment

The Patriot Act has a bad pedigree and an evil history. In the fearful days immediately following Sept. 11, 2001, the Department of Justice quickly sent draft legislation to Congress that, if enacted, would have permitted federal agents to violate their oaths to uphold the Constitution by writing their own search warrants. The draft subsequently was revealed to have been written before Sept. 11, but that's another story.

Going Two Ways at Once Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tom Steyer, Pope Francis, and climate change hypocrisy

Most leftists operate in a haze of hypocrisy, blinded by a total lack of self-awareness. They preach sanctimoniously to the rest of us about how we should lead our lives, usually without a compulsion to lead their lives in similar fashion. The "rules" they generate and enforce through intimidation, fear and often the force of government, are for the rest of us suckers. Case in point: Democrats trying to stick us with the horrors of Obamacare while demanding exemptions for their political cronies -- and for themselves.

No substitute for seriousness in Iraq

A recent weekend brought two very different dispatches from the front lines of the global war on terror. The first was a tale of tactical success; the second a narrative of strategic failure.

Rodgers and Hart before Hollywood

Even the most talented composer of songs is lucky if he can find one lyricist as a collaborator, but Richard Rodgers was blessed with two great ones, first Lorenz Hart and then Oscar Hammerstein.

Ferreting out the fakers

Fairly or not, polygraph examiners for the Central Intelligence Agency and other institutions that require security clearances for staff are not necessarily the most popular guys in the coffee shop. And for good reason: much of their professional lives are devoted to ferreting out secrets their subjects would prefer to leave untold.