Skip to content

Commentary

Featured Articles

Hiroshima

No second thoughts about a bomb for Hiroshima

- The Washington Times

The pointless debate continues. As reliable as the arrival of the scorching heat and drenching humidity of August, comes the debate (mostly by academics) over whether the United States is guilty of moral outrage for having dropped the atomic bombs on Japan on Aug. 6 and 9, 1945, to put an end to the carnage of World War II.

Illustration on the virtues of the private Donald Trump               The Washington Times

The two Donald Trumps

Love him or hate him, no one has been able to figure out Donald Trump. No one, that is, except Norma Foerderer.

Illustration on Russian advances in the arctic by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Playing catch-up in the Arctic

The U.S. Government Accountability Office says that the Obama administration is forcing our military to measure ice levels in the resources-rich Arctic. The president’s thinking, according to reports, is that shrinking ice could force us to institute a “military and homeland security presence” in the region.

Rica Madrid poses for a photograph as she rolls a joint in her home on the first day of legal possession of marijuana for recreational purposes, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, in Washington. Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser defied threats from Congress by implementing a voter-approved initiative on Thursday, making the city the only place east of the Mississippi River where people can legally grow and share marijuana in private. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Tracking the trends

Why do we follow the news? To be informed, of course. We naturally want to be aware of what’s happening at home and around the world.

Illustration on the civil rights of the unborn by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the abortion tide turns

Anew Facebook profile photo is beginning to spread on the Internet, especially among members of the rising millennial generation. It’s a picture of a baby within the womb. Superimposed on the baby is an equal sign.

Related Articles

Illustration on the interrelationship between animals and mankind by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Cecil was a bad boy

"American, single-handedly, saves 600 African antelopes and 12 baby elephants -- by killing a lion." As you read the first part of the previous sentence, you most likely are thinking "this is a good guy." But when you read the last part of the sentence -- particularly if you are a cat lover -- you may be thinking "this is a bad guy."

Illustration on Britain's struggle to secure it's southern border by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Another invasion by Britain

When music fans think of "the British invasion," they are referring to '60s bands like the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. Britain today, however, faces a different type of invasion.

Illustration on arming airline pilots by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring safety in airliner cockpits

Airline pilots have always been armed, except for a period from 1988 to 2002 when passivity in the face of violence somehow seemed logical. After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, many wondered why pilots were ever disarmed. Congress passed the law that rearmed airline pilots with large, bipartisan, veto proof majorities in both houses of Congress. Rearming airline pilots has proven to be safe, very inexpensive and a highly effective deterrent to those who would use civilian airliners filled with innocent people as weapons of mass destruction.

Illustration on Union violence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Closing a union-violence loophole

On July 20, U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson sentenced Joseph Dougherty, the former boss of Philadelphia-based Local 401 of the Ironworkers union, to 19 years in prison for "overseeing a years-long campaign of sabotage, arson, and intimidation," as Philadelphia Inquirer staff writer Jeremy Roebuck put it. Mr. Dougherty's targets were nonunion construction employees and employers.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Killer, Come Hither'

Louis Begley is no Mickey Spillane, nor is his hero, Jack Dana, a Mike Hammer, that is, until Jack meets and kills his foe with all the finesse of the most hard-boiled detective.

(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life's a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

"The slippery slope" doesn't frighten very many people in Washington because that's where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it's usually quite profitable. But it's a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

Illustration contrasting Reagan's dealings with the Soviets and Obama's with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Barack Obama, you're no Ronald Reagan'

In a recent interview defending the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, President Obama argued that that his approach to Iran is essentially the same as that which Ronald Reagan took toward the Soviet Union. Mr. Obama said that " where I completely admire him was his recognition that [an agreement would be worth doing] if you were able to verify an agreement that you would negotiate with the evil empire that was hell-bent on our destruction and was a far greater existential threat to us than Iran will ever be."