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Mitt Romney

Another look at a savvy loser

The Washington Times

Mitt Romney would defeat Barack Obama if they were matched again today. One or two polls say so. But they’re not matched today and a poll like that is only for a friendly conversation over a cup of coffee.

In this Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, photo, a McDonald's Big Mac sandwich is photographed at a McDonald's restaurant in Robinson Township, Pa. McDonald's saw a key sales figure drop in the U.S. again in February 2014, as the world's biggest hamburger chain struggles to beat back competition and adapt to changing eating habits. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

The Democrats’ unhappy meal

Burger King’s retreat to the Great White North reveals the consequences of setting the tax rate too high. The iconic Florida-based fast-food chain intends to merge with Tim Horton’s, the equally iconic coffee-and-doughnuts chain in Canada. The resulting burger and doughnuts conglomerate would be based in Ontario, where taxes are reasonable.

Stephen Colbert arrives at HBO's Post Emmy Awards reception on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014 in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

Twits in pursuit of Twitter

To rescue the nation from “political misinformation” and “hate speech,” the U.S. government is spending nearly a million dollars to look into how animated cat images spread across the Internet do harm. At best, it’s a waste of time. At worst, it’s a tool to suppress free speech.

Waiting for Godot Court Ruling Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Suing the feds gets old

There is a reason so many citizens who reach the Supreme Court of the United States in their battles with the federal government and emerge to face reporters and their cameras are elderly, white-haired widows. Fighting the world’s largest law firm is like “Waiting for Godot,” but worse. Samuel Beckett’s absurdist play was fiction, but the ludicrous lengths to which federal lawyers go to avoid Judgment Day is all too real. Stanley K. Mann of Colorado, now 82, spent 20 years awaiting that day.

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Congressional Internet Regulation and Taxation Plan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Choosing between two Internet evils

For the past several years, a group of senators has been desperate to enact a tax on Internet sales, attempting a number of strategies that have, thankfully, failed.

Flag of Uslam Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Finally confronting the Islamist threat

America's inconsistent response to the current Islamic State atrocities indicates that we are failing to understand, or deliberately ignoring, the facts that drive the terrorist organization's ideology.

BOOK REVIEW: 'America's Mistress'

If Eartha Kitt is remembered at all today, it is either because of her appearances as Catwoman on the ultra-campy 1960s "Batman" TV series, or (by political junkies) because she made Lady Bird Johnson teary after a luncheon at the White House by delivering a rambling, alcohol-fueled rant against President Lyndon Johnson's Vietnam policies.

Iraq ISIS ISIL Jihadi Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The radical side of social media

The British accent heard from the man who brutally murdered U.S. journalist James Foley last week is another reminder that British citizens are traveling to Syria to join terrorist organizations in unprecedented numbers. In the past few years, the Internet, which quickly spread the grisly video of his death far and wide, has transformed how the toxic message of radical Islam and jihad in Syria, which inspires these men, can be spread.

Nixon Book

Ex-aide to John Dean trashes Watergate figure's book

According to John Dean's new book, "The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It," President Nixon knew a lot more about Watergate a lot sooner than he ever admitted. However, the question one should ask before plowing through Mr. Dean's 746-page "definitive" history is, "What difference, at this point, does it make?"

Banker Follows Graduates Illustration by William Brown

Digitizing the authentic education

Thousands of moms and dads, following the script written into an autumn ritual of the middle class, are preparing to say farewell to the sons and daughters they've loved, nurtured and tried to civilize for nearly two decades.

Burger King's "King" Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Chasing Burger King to Canada

Burger King's effort to acquire Tim Hortons, a Canadian purveyor of coffee and doughnuts, is a good business decision, but its choice to locate corporate headquarters north of the border would be the direct result of President Obama's anti-business tax policies.

President Golf  Inconvenience Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The duffer-in-chief

President Obama stood before the cameras to share his outrage at the horrific beheading of a heroic young American reporter by the Islamic State. As soon as the cameras were turned off, he headed off to the golf course to tee it up with a few of his friends.

Turkey Davutoglu Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Talking Turkey with an Islamist academician

As Recep Tayyip Erdogan ascends Thursday to the presidency of Turkey, his hand-picked successor, Ahmet Davutoglu, simultaneously assumes Mr. Erdogan's old job of prime minister.

It's time to let Norwegian Air International fly here

Throughout the course of history, open competition has driven commercial organizations to innovate new products, services and technologies that give consumers greater choices for better products at greater value.

FILE - In this June 18, 2014, file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen speaks during a news conference at the Federal Reserve in Washington. Economists agree with Yellen that the economy and job market still need ultra-low interest rates to support growth. Yet the latest Associated Press survey of economists shows that most also fear that the Fed will wait too long before raising rates, perhaps triggering high inflation or financial asset bubbles.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Economic numbers that hide the gloom

A bunch of economic numbers from the government this week, which should be taken with a large grain of salt, are expected to show the economy has been doing much better in the past three months.