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Illustration on Obama's undermining of the U.S. military by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Undermining the military

When President Obama announced that he was going to “fundamentally transform” America, not many Americans understood the full depth of that statement. Based on an assessment of his policies over the last six and half years, clearly one of Mr. Obama’s objectives has been to diminish America’s standing and leadership role throughout the world. One result has been that our allies now don’t trust us and our enemies don’t fear us — the worst possible combination.

President Johnson signs Medicare legislation July 30, 1965.                Associated Press photo

Medicare at age 50

Diehard defenders of President Obama’s continuing, wretched rollout of the Affordable Care Act may be quick to point out that other government programs, most notably Medicare, also had rocky starts. But the historical record doesn’t support such nonsense.

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

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Hillary Must Be Lying Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary lies again

In a column I wrote in early July, based on research by my colleagues and my own analysis of government documents and eyewitness statements, I argued that in 2011 and 2012 Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waged a secret war on the governments of Libya and Syria, with the approval of President Obama and the consent of congressional leadership from both parties and in both houses of Congress.

On the presidential campaign trail, Republicans are intensifying the pressure on Democratic front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton, who has yet to comment on the videos despite being a pro-choice advocate who last year received Planned Parenthood's top honor, the PPFA Margaret Sanger Award. (Associated Press)

Hillary's past returns, with sharper teeth this time

"Those who cannot remember the past," the philosopher George Santayana reminded us, "are condemned to repeat it." The young, particularly the young voters of 2016, have no memory of Bill Clinton, and along with the rest of us they're about to get a reprise of the Hillary story.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Hokusai'

Between the 17th and 19th centuries, ukiyo-e was one of the most influential artistic styles in Japan. Composed of woodblock prints and traditional painting, typical scenes included historical events, folk stories, beautiful women and the rigors of daily life.

Inspectors General and Hillary's Email Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's great gambit

The plot thickens. As we all know, the inspector general of the intelligence community has discovered that a small number of emails on Hillary Rodham Clinton's personal, albeit mysterious, server were in fact classified e-mails. She as recently as this weekend denied that they were classified, but we shall see. There could be many more classified documents on that server. After all, she herself admits there were some 30,000 more e-mails.

Illustration on America's radical Islamist enemies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Defeating the mortal enemies

"The enemy has to be defeated," U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter last week told American forces stationed in the Middle East. That is a simple truth, one that, regrettably, is not heard often from officials in the current administration. Mr. Carter then added: "It will be, because the barbarians are always defeated by civilization." That is a comforting sentiment -- one that, regrettably, is not supported by historical evidence.

Pinocchio (Associated Press)

When the Big Lie becomes the legacy

- The Washington Times

Maybe the Christian thing to do is to cut John Kerry a little slack. He hit his head harder than the doctor thought when he fell off his bicycle in Switzerland.

Earth Igloo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting very unsettled science

If you have been to the beach at Treasure Island, Florida (adjoining St. Petersburg), you will notice something very odd. The hotels (many of which were built in the 1950s and '60s) and the seawall are very far from the water in the Gulf of Mexico — giving an extraordinarily wide beach. It was not always that way. When the hotels and seawall were built, they were set back from the high tide a normal hundred yards or so; but over the years, there was a natural but unforeseen accretion to the beach — which, having grown up in the area, I observed. (It can be seen on Google Earth.)

Illustration on the dominance of the U.N in the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fantasists, bumblers and Iran

First the Obama administration denied that any secret side deals were made when they negotiated the agreement that they insist us will prevent Iran from producing and deploying nuclear weapons. Secretary of State Kerry assured us that it was a "fantasy" to believe there could have been a better deal, and the president said the only alternative is war.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump    Illustration by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Let Trump be Trump

Politics -- and politicians in a democracy -- are a true reflection of society's virtues and faults at a given window in time.