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Lifting the covers on ‘Obamoogle’

During this past week as we’ve been swamped with bad news pouring out of every corner of the globe, it wouldn’t be surprising if you missed one of the more shocking revelations about White House actions that would make even Richard Nixon blush.

Chart to accompany Moore article March 30, 2015

Not hard at work but hardly working

The great conundrum of the U.S. economy today is that we have record numbers of working-age Americans out of the labor force at the same time we have businesses desperately trying to find workers. For example, the American Transportation Research Institute estimates there are about 35,000 trucker jobs that could be filled tomorrow if workers would take these jobs — a shortage that could rise to 240,000 by 2022.

Phasing out renewable energy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pulling the plug on renewable energy

There is never a good time for bad public policy. For few policies is this more evident than renewable energy mandates (REM), variously known as renewable portfolio standards, alternative energy standards and renewable energy standards.

Illustration on Putin's designs on eastern Europe BY Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Russia’s grab for its neighbors

A bipartisan consensus is emerging that the United States should do more to address Russia’s continuing aggression against Ukraine. But Russian revanchism does not begin or end with Ukraine, nor are “little green men” its only foreign policy instrument. Moscow is actively engaged in subversive activities along Europe’s eastern flank, targeting the region’s economic and political stability. As Central European capitals grow increasingly concerned, Washington urgently needs to demonstrate its robust commitment not just to the region’s security but to its democratic future.

Related Articles

Warming up to a climate of doubt

As much of New England continues to dig out from late winter's massive snowstorms, the climate change lobby is doubling down.

STEPHEN MOORE: Young Americans opting out of workforce

The great conundrum of the U.S. economy today is that we have record numbers of working-age Americans out of the labor force at the same time we have businesses desperately trying to find workers. For example, the American Transportation Research Institute estimates there are about 35,000 trucker jobs that could be filled tomorrow if workers would take these jobs — a shortage that could rise to 240,000 by 2022.

Vive la difference

Like family traits, national characteristics may evolve or dilute over the generations, but they never really go away. As with family DNA, national DNA is reinforced by attitudes, traditions and surroundings — nature working hand in hand with nurture. This is especially true in countries with long-standing national and linguistic unity and a strong sense of cultural identity.

Penalty for straying from ‘tribe’?

The Washington Times has risen one notch in my estimation by publishing Eric Althoff's article on former Rep. Bob Inglis, South Carolina Republican ("Bob Inglis breaks from Republican Party, advocates action to fight climate change," Web, March 24). While a climate change denier such as Willy Soon is being called a hero (rather than a rogue for accepting $1 million to shill for the fossil-fuel industry), a real hero such as Mr. Inglis gets booted out of the "tribe" for having the temerity to take a principled position not endorsed by Rush Limbaugh or Fox News.

Russia's grab for its neighbors

A bipartisan consensus is emerging that the United States should do more to address Russia's continuing aggression against Ukraine. But Russian revanchism does not begin or end with Ukraine, nor are "little green men" its only foreign policy instrument. Moscow is actively engaged in subversive activities along Europe's eastern flank, targeting the region's economic and political stability. As Central European capitals grow increasingly concerned, Washington urgently needs to demonstrate its robust commitment not just to the region's security but to its democratic future.

Not hard at work but hardly working

The great conundrum of the U.S. economy today is that we have record numbers of working-age Americans out of the labor force at the same time we have businesses desperately trying to find workers. For example, the American Transportation Research Institute estimates there are about 35,000 trucker jobs that could be filled tomorrow if workers would take these jobs — a shortage that could rise to 240,000 by 2022.

Warming up to a climate of doubt

As much of New England continues to dig out from late winter's massive snowstorms, the climate change lobby is doubling down.

Illustration on the lack of U.S abortion data by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unhealthy state of abortion statistics

Abortion advocates in Congress and in state legislatures claim that abortions are "safe." Yet numerous, long-standing problems at the state and federal level illustrate that the abortion data collection and reporting system in the United States is haphazard and dysfunctional, making assertions about "abortion safety" unreliable.

President Barack Obama speaks about payday lending and the economy, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at Lawson State Community College in Birmingham, Ala.  (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Barack Obama's love bomb offensive

- The Washington Times

President Obama says Rudy Giuliani was wrong. He does, too, love America. That's good enough for me. He says he's a Christian, despite his constant love bombs for Islam, and if that's good enough for God it's good enough for me, too. Conversations between believers and the Almighty are confidential, and have yet to be cracked by the National Security Agency (but we can be sure they're working on it).

Warren’s pitchfork brigade skewers the facts

Ted Cruz's announcement this week that he's running for president has officially kicked off the 2016 primary season and has put the pressure on other potential GOP candidates to declare. On the Democratic side of the scrum there is Elizabeth Warren, whom progressives hope is the candidate-in-waiting to lead their pitchfork brigade against the "1 percent." While it's still unclear whether Mrs. Warren will announce, it's assured that her income inequality position will drive a major plank in the eventual Democratic nominee's platform.

Illustration on Hillary and Republicans by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Hillary's advantage

The latest CNN/ORC presidential poll shows that Hillary Clinton continues to lead all GOP contenders by wide margins.

Finding a killer driven by ‘nuclear rage’

The investigating team of Alex Delaware and Milo Sturgis is coping with unsolved "cold cases" and an ice-cold killer in this crafty and cleverly plotted mystery.