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George H. W. Bush   Associated Press photo

Weak, confused and ‘unable to grasp’

- The Washington Times

Many bad things happen when a leader is weak, confused and forever in search of a credible reason to do nothing. For all his softness on Islam, Barack Obama has little insight into the men who send out mobs to cry “death to America.” He can’t imagine that men can listen to the call to evening Muslim prayer, which so captivated him as a boy growing up in Indonesia — “the prettiest sound on Earth” — and be inspired to dream of bringing down death on America.

Illustration on NOAA's climate change fictions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

NOAA’s climate change science fiction

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is the nation’s leading collector of climate data. Every day, NOAA analyzes vast amounts of data to predict changes to our climate, weather, oceans and coasts. The agency also publishes monthly temperature averages across the nation and compares those numbers to historical temperature records.

The Invincible Obama Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Behind Obama’s lack of leadership

President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki killed more than 200,000 civilians but stopped a war that had already killed tens of millions and could have wiped out millions more.

Illustration on Obama's undermining Arctic oil exploration and production by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tapping into energy obstructionism

When the Obama administration moved to embrace offshore energy exploration in Alaska earlier this year, skeptics raised a leery eyebrow. Could an administration so hostile to fossil fuels actually change its stripes?

Related Articles

Real enemy is in White House

Having had President Obama in office for almost seven years, the American public should no longer be confused about who the real enemy is. During his reign in office — yes, reign is the correct description of his time in the White House — Mr. Obama has abandoned all the principles that have made this a great nation. Denigrating our democratic friends internationally while coddling the perpetrators of terror, he has destroyed the credibility of our nation and our stated mission.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Dark Corners'

Psychological mysteries are a Ruth Rendell specialty, and her final book is no exception. It is an exploration of an ostensibly average group of people and how they become involved in a murder over failure to pay rent. The decline and fall of Carl Martin might be considered a warning about what a really nasty tenant can do to a landlord.

Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen answers to the House Oversight Committee in the panel's continuing probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the government's tax agency, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Earlier this month, IRS official Lois Lerner was called to testify about the controversy but refused to answer questions by committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and invoked her Fifth Amendment rights at least nine times. Associated Press Photo

Impeach IRS chief John Koskinen

After revelations that the Internal Revenue Service was restricting political speech and targeting conservative and tea party groups, John Koskinen was appointed to head the agency, promising reform and transparency.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Main That Got Away: The Life and Songs of Harold Arlen'

Perhaps it is because songs are called by the name their lyricist has given them that their composers sometimes seem to be less-known than the wordsmiths. Unless, of course, when they have been part of an indelible duo that has somehow entered the lexicon of musicals, like Rodgers and Hart, or Kern and Hammerstein, or after Kern and Hart dropped off, that rare successful remarriage Rodgers and Hammerstein.

Illustration on giving thanks for the American military by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Grateful for American muscle

We Americans have much to be grateful for. Every year we gather together with friends and family to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday. When we do, we should be grateful as well for the service of the American military in far-flung outposts.

The monument to General Gouverneur K. Warren at Gettysburg     The Washington Times

A Thanksgiving message in bronze

In the fall of 1865, America marked its first Thanksgiving since the end of the Civil War. Seven months earlier, after Robert E. Lee had surrendered on April 9, the North held a spontaneous jubilee. Cannons boomed, fireworks illuminated the night sky, bands played, people sang in the streets and crowds cheered the savior of the Union, Abraham Lincoln.

"Freedom From Want" by Norman Rockwell          Associated Press photo

Finding more than faults on the all-American holiday

Has anybody seen Norman Rockwell? We gather together for the Thanksgiving holiday and a few days of family togetherness. The tables are groaning under time-honored dishes of our Pilgrim forefathers, or so we like to think. We tell innocent stories about them and their Native American guests (or "Indians," as the first settlers called them.)

Religious Roots of Thanksgiving Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Proclaiming a day of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the time when America's religious roots and traditions are publicly displayed. While we think of feasting at tables filled with food and drink, and imagine the Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony inviting neighboring Indians to join them to celebrate a plentiful harvest, Thanksgiving Day has a much more religious meaning. It was not uncommon in the 17th and 18th centuries for individual colonies to set aside days for prayers of gratitude to our Lord.

Separation of Church and State Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

John Kasich's bad idea

Conservatives are supposed to be against big government and opposed to the left's belief that problems can and should be solved by Washington.

Illustration on the emergence of a tyrannical government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What to be thankful for?

What if the government's goal is to perpetuate itself? What if the real levers of governmental power are pulled by agents, diplomats and bureaucrats behind the scenes? What if they stay in power no matter who is elected president or which political party controls Congress?

Illustration on Thanksgiving Day by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

An exceptional holiday of exceptional America

There are two particularly quintessentially American holidays: Independence Day, when we celebrate our declaration of independence from the British, which began the most successful experiment in human liberty. And Thanksgiving, when we offer appreciation for the wondrous blessings in our individual lives and in the life of the nation.

An American flag sits in front of gravestones on Veterans Day at San Francisco National Cemetery in the Presidio of San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

A refugee's tale of Thanksgiving

As I grew up in America, I came to realize that the most effective antidote for fear is not courage, but gratitude.