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Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America’s immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

Illustration of Paul Nitze     The Washington Times

The road not taken to nuclear disarmament

Why have so many been so shocked by this latest episode of brinkmanship over the threat of a nuclear war with the unhinged dictatorship in North Korea? It is worth remembering that we have had plenty of warning that such a horrific showdown was headed our way. Indeed, 18 years ago, America’s leading authority on nuclear arms strategy explicitly laid out the stark risks that faced us unless we changed our ways.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America’s sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear — again — that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Jihad Axis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Qatar crisis

Qatar’s role in undermining the stability of the Sunni Islamic world is undisputed, and is on a par with that of Iran. Qatar has used the Doha-based Al Jazeera media network to conduct a propaganda war against its Sunni rivals, and also provided massive funding for terrorist militias to undercut its less-jihadist Sunni neighbors.

Related Articles

Iran Non-Treaty Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Subverting the role of the treaty in American diplomacy

It is ironic that the contemporary discussion concerning American diplomacy should focus on the Paris Climate Accord. Students of history will appreciate that in 1778 that the first grand diplomatic debate of our country, the Treaty of Amity and Commerce, centered on France and is considered the first cornerstone treaty in American history.

William Maclay Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How the title of 'president' came to be

Thursday is the 280th anniversary of the birth of William Maclay, not exactly a household word, even in the homes of historians. He has a singular claim to fame, namely, as a senator in the first Congress under the Constitution meeting in 1789.

Illustration on the dire results of nuclear proliferation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The proliferation problem from hell

On the surface, Iran and North Korea could hardly be more different. The former is a Middle Eastern theocracy, its ideology based on a bellicose reading of Islamic scripture. The latter is Asian and atheist, its ideology, Juche, loosely rooted in Stalinism. But scratch the surface, and you'll find significant similarities.

How Trump's opponents aid the Russians

In his recent Warsaw address, President Trump challenged our allies and Americans to defend Western Civilization. This requires courage and significant commitments of resources for defense, the instruments of soft power and diplomacy. However, it also requires better self-discipline in our domestic affairs, lest we give aid and comfort to our enemies.

Left Wing University Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When institutions drift left

I have recently been reminded of one of my earliest conclusions about the American left. I arrived at that conclusion when what we now call the left was relatively civilized. We called it, in those days, American liberalism, but even then it was fla fla.

Onwards with the Iranian Resistance: Regime change within reach (cover, July 18, 2017)

Compliant but dangerous Iran

Last Friday marked the second anniversary of an agreement on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), better known as the Iran nuclear deal. I was a critic of the deal at the time, and I continue to be alarmed by Iran's aggression on the world stage.

Un-American court demands Rowan County quit praying

- The Washington Times

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit ruled 10-5 that Rowan County, North Carolina, commissioners couldn't open their government sessions with prayer. What a travesty for America, the country English writer and philosopher Gilbert Keith "G.K." Chesterton once referred to as "the only nation in the world that is founded on a creed," a creed that "clearly names the Creator as the ultimate authority.'

Harry S Truman. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

What to do with the narcissist's children

- The Washington Times

Pity the poor presidents. It's not enough for presidents to deal with enemies foreign and domestic, conduct warfare with Congress and dispense lollipops. Sometimes they have to deal with "help" from sons, daughters, brothers, in-laws and other hangers-on to the bully furniture at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

China Steel Dumping Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting American steelworkers first

As President Trump returns from his first G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, we are reminded that some countries do not want to see America grow stronger and be a beacon for freedom around the globe. During his historic inauguration speech while speaking about the decline of American industry, Mr. Trump made clear that "this American carnage stops right here and stops right now." It's clear that the carnage that has taken place in U.S. industries such as steel and aluminum needs to come to an end. As Mr. Trump has said repeatedly, we need to "buy American and hire American."

Illustration on Trump's direct communication with the American people through his Twitter messages by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

President Trump's tweets

I admit, I'm a real fan of President Trump's tweets. It's an uncensored, uninhibited and direct way for him to react and communicate "his take" on daily events. Even though his lawyers may cringe and wish he wouldn't tweet, it has changed -- forever -- the "natural order of things" in Washington D.C., a city forever in love with itself.

Illustration on the fallacious 1992 report claiming a 19 percent minimum wage increase in New Jersey raised the rate of fast food employment in that state by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When minimum wage surveys are flawed and misleading

It was "fake news" before anyone was familiar with the term: The claim that a 19 percent minimum wage increase in New Jersey in 1992 caused an increase in fast food employment compared to neighboring Pennsylvania.

Voters Registered in Perpetuity Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tracing the range of voter fraud

The media came unhinged over President Trump's Advisory Commission on Voter Integrity. CNN falsely claimed that 44 states had stonewalled requests for voter data, when only 14 had done so. Media outlets screamed "voter intimidation!" Their fury suggests that Mr. Trump is onto something really big.

Gilbert Public Schools in Arizona is defending its decision to place pro-abstinence, anti-abortion stickers in its biology textbooks, following complaints from pro-choice parents. (Twitter/@suzanne_young)

What's up and what's down in American culture

Say you want to know which direction the numbers in the U.S. are heading when it comes to welfare dependency. Or you're curious about the divorce rate, or how bad teen drug use is. Or you're wondering about unemployment or what the high-school graduation rate is.

Loss of Freedom Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When legal protections begin to disappear

Do you mainly fear government or feel protected by it? The American Founders wrote a Constitution and designed a system of government that sharply limited the powers of the state --because they understood that the greatest danger to the liberty of the people was the necessary evil of government.

Ronald Reagan on the Tonight Show in 1975          The Washington Times

'Here's Ronnie!'

While scanning YouTube videos, I came across an appearance by Ronald Reagan on "The Tonight Show," hosted by Johnny Carson. The year was 1975 and Mr. Reagan was "between jobs," having left office as governor of California, where he served for eight years, but not yet president. He would challenge Gerald Ford for the Republican nomination in 1976, barely losing at the nominating convention, but setting himself up for what would be a successful run in 1980.

Nothing Burger Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Charging treason and ruining a republic

The latest nothingburger ablaze on the media grill is that Donald Trump Jr. may have committed treason when he met with a woman he believed to be an agent of the Russian government who claimed to possess information that Hillary Clinton had colluded with that country.

Illustration on the Cruz Amendment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Ted Cruz rescued Republicans on Obamacare

Finally, Republicans are getting smart on Obamacare. It took one of the savviest Republican senators --Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas with an assist from Sen. Mike Lee of Utah -- to get the GOP to figure out how to replace Obamacare, reduce premiums and save money for the government -- all without alienating millions of voters. He's pulled the Republicans' fannies out of the fire by flipping a political losing strategy into a big time winner.

Sudanese Genocide War Criminal Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting Sudan on notice

If you were told that an indicted war criminal who is responsible for the death of thousands of Sudanese citizens should be allowed to gain the economic benefits of trading with the U.S., what would you say? On July 12 the Trump administration postponed a decision for 90 days on whether to continue to implement Executive Order 13761 regarding sanctions on Sudan that were established as the result of decades of violence, genocide and crimes against humanity.

Illustration on the IRGC by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran's terrorism goliath

ISIS has captivated Western attention for so long with its gruesome beheadings, stabbings, vehicular homicides, shootings and bombings in Europe and the United States, the horrific aftermaths deservedly the focus of television news, that virtually forgotten is the world's biggest terror threat -- Iran's IRGC, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps.