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Madness! Even the giraffes have gone crazy

- The Washington Times

We owe Chicken Little an apology. Maybe the sky really is falling. Evidence is everywhere. Cries and whimpers suddenly grow deafening as the landscape is dusted with snowflakes, who imagine they’re unique and have in common with other snowflakes only an extremely low melting point.

Illustration on anarchist and totalitarian strains in the leftist Antifa movement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Old hatreds made new

Amid the chaos of Charlottesville, two specters from the previous century’s darkest hours have re-emerged. Alongside the well-publicized Nazi symbols on full display during the “Unite the Right” rally, so too were Communist hammers and sickles brandished by the opposing anti-fascist or “Antifa” protesters.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forgetting McConnell’s greatest achievement

Mitch McConnell has been taking quite a beating from President Trump for failing to get a health care reform bill through the Senate, but even Mr. Trump has largely conceded that John McCain, alone blew up the majority leader’s painstakingly crafted compromise.

Presidential Courage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

North Korea and fear

At the heart of the Cold War, the ever-present nuclear threat had a profound effect on the American psyche. Children hiding under desks during air raid drills during the 1960s and 1970s had longer-term implications in terms of mental and physical health as studies in the 1980s revealed.

Union Vote Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Union workers celebrate right-to-work laws

As summer temperatures continue in the 90s, August beachgoers aren’t the only ones feeling the heat. In Missouri, union employees are getting burned by efforts to block implementation of right-to-work.

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Illustration on North Korea's backing down by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Armageddon postponed

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un appears to have blinked and President Trump can claim a foreign policy victory and justification for his strategy.

Illustration of Paul Nitze     The Washington Times

The road not taken to nuclear disarmament

Why have so many been so shocked by this latest episode of brinkmanship over the threat of a nuclear war with the unhinged dictatorship in North Korea? It is worth remembering that we have had plenty of warning that such a horrific showdown was headed our way. Indeed, 18 years ago, America's leading authority on nuclear arms strategy explicitly laid out the stark risks that faced us unless we changed our ways.

Jihad Axis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Qatar crisis

Qatar's role in undermining the stability of the Sunni Islamic world is undisputed, and is on a par with that of Iran. Qatar has used the Doha-based Al Jazeera media network to conduct a propaganda war against its Sunni rivals, and also provided massive funding for terrorist militias to undercut its less-jihadist Sunni neighbors.

This June 23, 2015, file photo shows a carving depicting confederates Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis, in Stone Mountain, Ga. Democratic front-runner for governor Stacey Abrams posted several tweets Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, saying the carving at the tourist attraction Stone Mountain Park and other Confederate statues and monuments around the state should be removed. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

Freedom for the speech we hate

Last weekend, serious violence broke out in Charlottesville, Virginia, when a group of white supremacist demonstrators was confronted by a group of folks who were there to condemn the message the demonstrators had come to advance. The message was critical of the government for removing a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee from a public place.

Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America's immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

Real progress in regulatory reform

It's true. A full seven months after President Trump's inauguration and the convening of a new Congress, there is a sense of frustration that not enough has been accomplished. Hopefully, when Congress and the president get back to Washington in September, we'll see solid progress on measures to cut taxes and reform the tax code, and to replace Obamacare with a more market-oriented system. Not to mention passage of a budget and action on the debt ceiling.

Illustration on men and women in the workplace and attitudes on gender roles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scapegoats, dupes and gulls

Identity politics has gone over the top, and the flood of intolerance is drenching everyone. What began as a campaign to re-right injustice has created injustice. What was meant to change attitudes toward intolerance has become intolerance enthroned.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

The deadly impact of identity politics

In the aftermath of the horror of the Charlottesville riot, there's been less condemnation by the media and the left of the neo-Nazi that is charged with murdering Heather Heyer and injuring at least 19 others than there has been of President Trump.

Illustration on U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

A new strategy for Afghanistan: change course, quit the fight

It has been reported in recent days that President Trump has angrily rejected the latest recommendation from his national security staff for a new Afghan war strategy. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, in other venues, has claimed the reason for the delay is that forming strategy is "hard work."

Illustration on the need for a U.S. comprehensive peace strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

In search of a grand U.S. strategy

Richard Nixon's rapprochement with China, the end of the Cold War, President Obama's outreach to "the Muslim world," the growth of the (largely American-funded) United Nations -- weren't such developments supposed to lead to a safer world, one in which the "international community" would embrace "universal values" and pursue common interests -- peace and security key among them?

A man casts his vote at a polling place Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Provo, Utah. The winner of a three-way Republican primary, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Utah will become the favorite to win the November special election and fill the congressional seat recently vacated by Jason Chaffetz. Republicans outnumber Democrats five-to-one in Utah's 3rd Congressional District, which stretches from the Salt Lake City suburbs and several ski towns southeast to Provo and Utah coal country. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Resisting election integrity

The Election Integrity Commission will resume its work in September, now that the frivolous lawsuits against it are, one by one, being dismissed. The most recent case is in New Hampshire, where the American Civil Liberties Union has dropped a case over sharing publicly available voter information with the commission. The Granite State compromised and will comply. More states are beginning to come around.

Illustration on a possible North Korean EMP attack by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The other North Korean threat

After massive intelligence failures grossly underestimating North Korea's long-range missile capabilities, number of nuclear weapons, warhead miniaturization, and proximity to manufacturing a hydrogen bomb, the biggest North Korean threat to the United States remains unacknowledged.

Illustration on CNN and "the moron vote" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Controversy at a pious cable news outlet

Last week CNN fired Jeffrey Lord, its famously pro-Trump contributor, for mocking an activist whom The Daily Caller has reported as a racist and an anti-Semite. Mr. Lord addressed him with the salutation, "Sieg Heil!" What is wrong with that? Is CNN covering for racists and anti-Semites?

Benjamin Franklin     Associated Press image

A riot with an unwelcome lesson

The Washington Times

The media mob wasted no time in descending on Charlottesville, and the first order of business was to exploit the bigotry, tragedy and evil to make it the work of the Republicans, conservatives, and above all, Donald Trump.