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Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America’s immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

Illustration of Paul Nitze     The Washington Times

The road not taken to nuclear disarmament

Why have so many been so shocked by this latest episode of brinkmanship over the threat of a nuclear war with the unhinged dictatorship in North Korea? It is worth remembering that we have had plenty of warning that such a horrific showdown was headed our way. Indeed, 18 years ago, America’s leading authority on nuclear arms strategy explicitly laid out the stark risks that faced us unless we changed our ways.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America’s sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear — again — that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Jihad Axis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Qatar crisis

Qatar’s role in undermining the stability of the Sunni Islamic world is undisputed, and is on a par with that of Iran. Qatar has used the Doha-based Al Jazeera media network to conduct a propaganda war against its Sunni rivals, and also provided massive funding for terrorist militias to undercut its less-jihadist Sunni neighbors.

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Illustration on China's involvement in the North Korean situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Girding for a showdown with China

North Korea's nuclear and missile programs present the United States with no good options, but China's posture is a foil for its wider strategic objectives.

An American flag flaps in the wind as storm clouds build over the main post office late Friday, Aug. 11, 2017, in Denver. Forecasters predict that the rainy, cool weather will prevail in the weekend ahead in the region. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Why America is great

After a 14-hour flight from Tbilisi, Georgia on Jan. 11, 2016, my plane landed at Dulles International Airport. This was my first visit to the United States, a country which I had long admired for many years. America. Where Ronald Reagan as president saved the world from the threat of communism and brought freedom to hundreds of millions of people.

Illustration on the Republican efforts to shore up Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beware the Obamacare industrial complex

The danger of a Republican bailout of Obamacare is mounting with every passing day. A group of "moderate" Republicans calling themselves the Problem Solvers Caucus is quietly negotiating with Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer to throw a multi-billion dollar life line to the Obamacare insurance exchanges.

Participants carry an American flag during the 4th of July parade in Santa Monica, Calif. on Tuesday, July 4, 2017. Decked out in red, white and blue, Californians waved flags and sang patriotic songs at Independence Day parades across the state. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

We are America

- The Washington Times

The hand-wringers were out in full force this past week, moaning and wailing about President Donald Trump's rhetoric regarding North Korea. But why? We are America. We don't bow down; we don't quiver in fear.

BOOK REVIEW: Three Minutes to Doomsday

Conrad, Ramsey and others in this spy ring gave the Soviets American's defensive war plans, nuclear launch codes and other military secrets. It was a devastating breach of security.

FILE - In this July 4, 2017, file photo, a U.S. missile defense system called Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, is seen at a golf course in Seongju, South Korea. North Korea claims it is in the final stages of preparing a plan to launch four intermediate-range ballistic missiles over Japan and into waters just off the island of Guam, where about 7,000 U.S. troops are based. The U.S. has pumped billions of dollars into its missile defense systems and sold hundreds of millions of dollars' worth to its allies, including the very controversial deployment of a state-of-the-art system known by its acronym, THAAD, in South Korea. (Kim Jun-beom/Yonhap via AP, File)

The South Pacific's strategic role

With the growing threat of long-range ballistic missile launches from North Korea, a new front has opened up in the Pacific's strategic framework: The South Pacific.

Illustration on Trump and the TPP by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump can learn from Barack Obama's TPP mistakes

During the 2016 campaign, Donald Trump bucked party orthodoxy on the left and the right, promising to withdraw from the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) and re-negotiate America's "horrible trade deals," including the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The president's pledge to stand up for American workers and businesses helped cement the election, moving voters in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Ohio and flipping those states red.

Illustration on diffusing conflict with Qatar by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Bringing Qatar back from open conflict with its brothers

The dispute between Qatar and its Arab neighbors hurts everyone involved. Qatar had agreed to cooperate with the other governments including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. Instead, they are involved in a boycott that verges on open warfare.

Russia probe may see indictments by Mueller

The grand jury is the prosecutor's best friend: If he wants to get rid of a weak, unpopular or politically incorrect situation, he does a "slow roll" to the grand jury and then says, "Well, the grand jury refused to indict," and shrugs his shoulders. The case -- and whatever controversies are associated with it -- simply goes away and the prosecutor washes his hands of it.

Illustration on sanctuary cities as hideouts by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sanctuary cities vs. hideouts

In biblical times, a sanctuary city was a place where someone who had committed unintentional manslaughter could find refuge from "the avenger of blood." If the offender left the sanctuary city, he could be set upon by a relative of the dead person and killed. No sanctuary was available to anyone who committed murder with malice aforethought.

Illustration on U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley and the North Korean situation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Nikki Haley -- A superstar in Donald Trump's Cabinet

Donald Trump has a skill for recruiting Cabinet officers he has treated badly. Serving in his administration can require selfless devotion to duty. Jeff Sessions, the attorney general, could tell you about that. So could Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations who is swiftly becoming the Cabinet superstar.

Illustration on the coming crisis in U.S. health care by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The coming single-payer health care system

President Trump's threat to withhold subsidies from insurance companies and congressional staff to purchase insurance will not likely result in Republicans agreeing on a plan to replace Obamacare. That sets the table for Democrats to further socialize American medicine.

A Haitian boy holds onto his father as they approach an illegally crossing point, staffed by Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers, from Champlain, N.Y., to Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec, Monday, Aug. 7, 2017. Seven days a week, 24-hours a day people from across the globe are arriving at the end of a New York backroad so they can walk across a ditch into Canada knowing they will be instantly arrested, but with the hope the Canadian government will be kinder to them than the United States. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

The hidden expense of fatherless families

Several years ago, my youngest son and I began a regular practice of packing several backpacks with packaged food, toiletries and small Bibles, and heading to downtown Washington, D.C. to pass them out to the homeless. Most of the people we met were men, and soon I discovered something that truly surprised me.

Acting Chief Medaria Arradondo listens during a Minneapolis City Council committee hearing Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, at City Hall in Minneapolis. The committee unanimously endorsed the nomination of Arradondo to become the first African-American police chief in Minnesota's largest city. The committee heard nearly two hours of public comments Wednesday from a broad cross-section of community members, who overwhelmingly supported Arradondo. (Anthony Souffle/Star Tribune via AP)

Sanctuary cities and the rule of law

Earlier this week, the Trump Department of Justice (DOJ) told the mayor of Chicago that it would cease funding grants to the Chicago Police Department that had been approved in the Obama administration because Chicago city officials were not cooperating with federal immigration officials.

Illustration on the history of preparedness for nuclear attack        The Washington Times

Reliving the nuclear worry

Intelligence reports to the effect that North Korea has produced a miniature nuclear warhead that can be placed inside its missiles jolts the historian to relive a past that most Americans don't recall.