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Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America’s immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

Illustration of Paul Nitze     The Washington Times

The road not taken to nuclear disarmament

Why have so many been so shocked by this latest episode of brinkmanship over the threat of a nuclear war with the unhinged dictatorship in North Korea? It is worth remembering that we have had plenty of warning that such a horrific showdown was headed our way. Indeed, 18 years ago, America’s leading authority on nuclear arms strategy explicitly laid out the stark risks that faced us unless we changed our ways.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America’s sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear — again — that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Jihad Axis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Qatar crisis

Qatar’s role in undermining the stability of the Sunni Islamic world is undisputed, and is on a par with that of Iran. Qatar has used the Doha-based Al Jazeera media network to conduct a propaganda war against its Sunni rivals, and also provided massive funding for terrorist militias to undercut its less-jihadist Sunni neighbors.

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In this Nov. 14, 2016, file photo, Caitlyn Jenner arrives at the Glamour Women of the Year Awards in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File) **FILE**

Caitlyn Jenner commits a hat crime

Imagine this: Someone goes through massive body-altering, gender-changing surgery, changes her life and risks the rejection of her family, all in order to be her genuine self.

Illustration of Bashar Assad by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

One for the graveyard of Middle East predictions

"The Middle East is the graveyard of predictions" notes the left-wing writer and editor Adam Shatz. That's partly because it's so volatile (no one in 2014 imagined the revival of an executive caliphate after 11 centuries) and it's perverse (Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan started a near-civil war against the Kurds to win constitutional powers he already enjoys).

Illustration on international aid to Africa by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Africa development imperative

Africa, the world's poorest continent, will see its population double over the next three decades. Without significant development progress, this population tidal wave will cause great human suffering, trigger destabilizing migrations and impact global security.

President Donald Trump listens as Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C. speaks during a meeting with the Republican Study Committee, Friday, March 17, 2017, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Why the West must cut the apologies

In early July, President Trump delivered what many believe was his best speech to date. Speaking at Krasinski Square in Warsaw, Poland, Mr. Trump gave an unabashed defense of the cultural values that have made Western civilization great.

Illustration on outsourcing U.S. air power in Afghanistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Outsourcing the air war in Afghanistan

Erik Prince, the owner of the former Blackwater security company, has proposed that the U.S. military outsource the air war in Afghanistan to him. Gen. John Nicholson, who currently commands the NATO effort in the war, has apparently refused to give the Prince proposal an airing.

Illustration on the hidden costs of hospitalization by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sickening hospital bills

A Yale study, and an accompanying profile in The New York Times, made waves this month for exposing what's called "surprise billing." This occurs when a patient receives a high, out-of-network bill for care received at an in-network hospital.

In this file photo taken Jan. 28, 2017, President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ** FILE **

Trump's 200 days short on GOP support

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump's administration, just rounding the corner into 200 days of leadership, has fallen short of realizing a key campaign promise, the repeal of Obamacare. Thanks go to Republicans for that failure.

In this Friday, Aug. 4, 2017, file photo, Venezuela's Constitutional Assembly poses for an official photo after being sworn in, at the National Assembly in Caracas, Venezuela. The Constitutional Assembly is expected to meet again on Tuesday, Aug. 8, and despite growing international criticism, Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro has remained firm in pressing the body forward in executing his priorities. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos, File)

The insurance compulsion

Venezuela is the latest global disaster caused by socialism. Over the last couple of hundred years, virtually every variety of socialism has been tried -- from communism to national socialism (Nazism) and fascism, to various varieties of "democratic socialism" -- with one common characteristic -- they all failed.

Illustration on unreliable alternate power by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The high cost of unreliable power

The climate obsessions of the Obama administration yielded a substantial myopia with respect to the other central goals of energy policy, the cost and reliability of the electric power system in particular.

Illustration on the deteriorating Venezuela situation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The coming collapse of Venezuela

- The Washington Times

As U.S. policymakers fret about Syria, Afghanistan, Ukraine and North Korea, far too little attention is being paid to the powder keg to the south of us that may be about to blow. Once-prosperous Venezuela has been coming apart for years, but the roundly condemned Constituent Assembly election engineered by presidential strongman Nicolas Maduro lit the fuse that could ignite a civil war in his country. With a Sunday attack by uniformed insurgents on a military base, the internecine battle may have already begun.

Illustration on PETA's attempts at insinuating itself into the Trump administration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dogging the Trumps

This past weekend saw the annual Animal Rights Conference take place just outside our nation's capital. The event is a who's who of activists from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the Humane Society of the United States, and like-minded groups that converge to discuss tactics for getting rid of meat, ice cream, circuses, zoos, aquariums, leather belts and silk shirts.

Former Vice President Al Gore. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When life gets tough for just about everybody

- The Washington Times

Life is tough, as the man said, and three out of three people die. It's apparently a lot worse than we thought. The world is coming apart at the seams, just like the naysayers said it would. Times have got so tough that you can't even trust fake news.

Confirmation of Christopher Wray as FBI Director Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A steady hand in an unsteady time

The FBI is the premier investigative agency in the world, with more than 35,000 agents and staff working all around the globe. The men and women of the FBI work diligently to disrupt and prevent terrorist attacks on America and to preserve the liberties of all Americans by upholding and enforcing the rule of law.