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Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America’s immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

Illustration of Paul Nitze     The Washington Times

The road not taken to nuclear disarmament

Why have so many been so shocked by this latest episode of brinkmanship over the threat of a nuclear war with the unhinged dictatorship in North Korea? It is worth remembering that we have had plenty of warning that such a horrific showdown was headed our way. Indeed, 18 years ago, America’s leading authority on nuclear arms strategy explicitly laid out the stark risks that faced us unless we changed our ways.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America’s sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear — again — that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Jihad Axis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Qatar crisis

Qatar’s role in undermining the stability of the Sunni Islamic world is undisputed, and is on a par with that of Iran. Qatar has used the Doha-based Al Jazeera media network to conduct a propaganda war against its Sunni rivals, and also provided massive funding for terrorist militias to undercut its less-jihadist Sunni neighbors.

Related Articles

Illustration on the end of al Jazeera by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Does Al Jazeera deserve to die?

The Gulf Cooperation Council comprises six nations, all of them Arab, Muslim, ruled by royals, and fabulously wealthy thanks to vast reserves of petroleum. With so much in common, you might expect they'd be best friends forever. In recent weeks, however, the emir of Qatar, Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, has been the odd monarch out.

Obama Plan to Usurp the Senate's Legislative Power Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's Paris climate scheme revelation

The New York Times on Aug. 24, 2014, broke a major news story: "Obama pushing Climate Accord in Lieu of Treaty." It's a clumsy headline -- no one dared claim the Kyoto Protocol was anything other than a treaty requiring Senate ratification, and even the Grey Lady calls it the "Kyoto Accord."

Illustration on the carelessness of the IRS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A culture of carelessness and secrecy at the IRS

The IRS systematically loses and destroys important federal records. Even if you request a file from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) under the Freedom of Information Act, there's no guarantee the agency will make a serious attempt to find your documents.

Russian Insecurity Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How the "Long Telegram" explains Putin's Russia

Russian experts, politicians and television's talking heads are constantly wondering whether Vladimir Putin's Russia is trying to reconstruct the old Soviet Union with its extended empire and aspirations, asking why else the country that gave up communism would invade Ukraine, threaten the Baltic states, interfere in Syria and even try to sabotage an American election.

In this July 17, 2016, file photo, then-Trump Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort talks to reporters on the floor of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Robert Mueller team shows history of crossing ethical lines

- The Washington Times

President Trump's advisers and defenders in trying to undermine former FBI Director Robert Mueller's investigation of the Trump campaign's alleged pre-election "collusion" with Vladimir Putin's Russia are pointing out that Mr. Mueller and another former FBI director, James Comey, are longtime buddies.

Rob Goldstone About to Get Busted Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Who is colluding with whom?

In the Russia-Trump imbroglio let us be clear. We are now months into it. A dozen or so culprits have been fingered, some being actually quite amusing. You will be seeing more of the fat British music promoter, Rob Goldstone, who has been photographed wearing a baseball hat emblazoned with a word denoting a type of female anatomy on it.

President Donald Trump pauses during a joint news conference with French President Emmanuel Macron at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Thursday, July 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trump's right: It's a sewer, not a swamp

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump tweeted in the lead-up to Jared Kushner's widely waited for Senate-Russia testimony that it's not a swamp he's trying to drain. It's a sewer. And yes indeed, that description is much more apt.

Illustration on government run Health Care by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The fake 'health care' debate

Confucius, who lived so long ago that famine, not obesity, menaced public health, supposedly observed that "the first step to wisdom is to call things by their proper name." If so, then angry congressional town hall meetings and serial legislative impasses are not really about health care, let alone reform.

FILE - IN this Dec. 2, 2009, file photo, the Total Port Arthur refinery is shown in Port Arthur, Texas. Federal lawsuits against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were filed claiming the agency has failed to correct Texas air pollution control permits with loopholes that make state enforcement rare. The suits filed Thursday, July 20, 2017, by the nonprofit Washington, D.C.-based Environmental Integrity Project, target permits for the largest integrated petrochemical factory in the U.S., three refineries near the Houston Ship Channel including the largest petroleum refinery in the U.S. and a coal-fired power plant east of Dallas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

Peddlers of junk science

For America's 207 million coffee drinkers, this month's "latest study" brought a venti-sized serving of good news: A healthy dose of coffee leads to a longer life.

Righting the Ship of Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A plan to save Social Security

It is no secret that what the major media seem to care most about is radically different from what concerns average Americans. While the inside-the-Beltway crowd continues to focus on alleged collusion between President Trump and Russia, real concerns like the future of Social Security are ignored.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y. and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. lead Congressional Democrats to a news conference to unveil their new agenda, Monday, July 24, 2017, in Berryville, Va. House and Senate Democrats are offering a retooled message and populist agenda, promising to working Americans "someone has your back."  (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Americans: Optimistic no more?

"The present is getting better. The future, not at all." So begins a recent New York Times article about a Pew study that shows the public adopting a rather dim outlook. "Even as more Americans say the economy is improving, a clear majority remain fearful about their children's financial prospects," it continues.

Sudan Corruption Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A necessary delay for easing of Sudan sanctions

The announcement last week by the Trump administration that it is delaying the Obama administration's order to ease sanctions on Sudan was a welcome decision. The three-month delay is not long enough to give the Sudanese the impression that we are not serious about this matter, but will be long enough to complete the needed and ongoing review of that government's adherence to the requirements of sanctions-easing.

Illustration on crony capitalism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Crony capitalism against the real thing

For the past decade, a strange migration of a couple of thousand people from all over the world to Las Vegas takes place -- in the middle of July. They come -- at least most -- not to gamble and certainly not for the weather where the normal daytime temperature is a 100-plus degrees, but to participate in an event called FreedomFest.

Kurdistan Partnership Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A strategic U.S. partner in Kurdistan

This year is the 25th anniversary of the election of the first Parliament and government of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). Thanks to the safe haven that the United States and its European allies created in 1991 to protect the displaced Kurdish population from Baghdad's brutal attacks, the Kurds turned a crisis into an opportunity to build a forward-looking nation with democratic aspirations.

Iranian Intentions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Certifiably wrong about Iran's compliance

During President Trump's campaign he said that Mr. Obama's 2015 nuclear weapons deal with Iran was the "worst deal ever." Although there are many diplomatic deals vying for that title, the deal engineered by Mr. Obama is at least one of the worst ever for two reasons.

How to fix the Obamacare fiasco

It's no grand revelation that Republicans have bungled the Obamacare repeal bill beyond belief. Sen. Mitch McConnell wants a Senate vote on full repeal of Obamacare with two years to come up with a replacement. This would be the ideal solution, but it appears he lacks the necessary 50 votes for passage.

Illustration on examining voter fraud by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rooting out vote fraud

Judging by the unhinged reaction this past week to the first public meeting of President Trump's blue-ribbon voter fraud panel, progressives are terrified.

Misdirected Canadian Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Time

The travesty of rewarding a terrorist

In July 2002, Omar Khadr was accused of throwing a hand grenade and killing a U.S. Army combat medic, Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer, on the battlefields of Afghanistan. Khadr was ultimately captured, linked to al Qaeda (reportedly through his father's connections), pled guilty, and sat in a Guantanamo Bay jail cell before being repatriated by Canada in 2012.

In this Feb. 28, 2017, photo, an F-15C Eagle from the California Air National Guard, 144th Fighter Wing, flies out of the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Restoring the military's moral underpinnings

The Trump administration came to power with a clear mandate to restore U.S. military credibility, effectiveness, and capabilities. Such a mandate involves reversing not only the debilitating impact of sequestration on our declining military force structure, but also the Obama administration's social engineering mandates forced on our military.