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Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America’s immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

Illustration of Paul Nitze     The Washington Times

The road not taken to nuclear disarmament

Why have so many been so shocked by this latest episode of brinkmanship over the threat of a nuclear war with the unhinged dictatorship in North Korea? It is worth remembering that we have had plenty of warning that such a horrific showdown was headed our way. Indeed, 18 years ago, America’s leading authority on nuclear arms strategy explicitly laid out the stark risks that faced us unless we changed our ways.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America’s sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear — again — that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Jihad Axis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Qatar crisis

Qatar’s role in undermining the stability of the Sunni Islamic world is undisputed, and is on a par with that of Iran. Qatar has used the Doha-based Al Jazeera media network to conduct a propaganda war against its Sunni rivals, and also provided massive funding for terrorist militias to undercut its less-jihadist Sunni neighbors.

Related Articles

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump greets workers during a visit to the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. More than 300 Carrier Corp. workers were being laid off Thursday, July 20, 2017, from the company's Indianapolis factory as part of an outsourcing of jobs to Mexico that drew criticism last year from then-presidential candidate Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The benefit of putting health care aside

"It ain't over till it's over," Yogi Berra said in his famous aphorism about losing. And that may eventually apply to the Republicans' failed attempt to "repeal and replace" President Obama's Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare.

Turkey and NATO Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

NATO alliance helping dictators

President Trump found NATO wanting. Then true to form, he acted like a CEO, not a president, serving notice that things had to change, or else. The "or else" he left undefined, creating angst among politicians and policy elites who, sensing their own failures, chose to focus on his manners not his message. Mr. Trump's poor political decorum notwithstanding, his policy judgment is right. NATO has to change.

Illustration on the border wall and security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond the good news of the wall

Based upon President Trump's promise to secure the U.S. Border with Mexico, illegal immigration plummeted during the first half of 2017. In the first three months of his presidency, illegal border crossings fell by nearly 75 percent from that of the previous year and represented a historic low in the modern history of the Border Patrol. What President Trump accomplished is nothing short of a miracle, but he can't continue to do it alone. Border security is not the sole responsibility of the White House; it's also the responsibility of Congress.

Robert Mueller. (Associated Press)

The swamp strikes back

- The Washington Times

A lot of snakes and scorpions live with the alligators in the swamp, and there are even more dangerous monsters there. No swamp creature is deadlier than a Washington lawyer.

Amazon Busts Through the Bricks and Mortar Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Embracing disruption and reinvention

In every age, civilizations embrace technologies that disrupt the status quo. Amazon and its internet brethren may be menacing to brick and mortar establishments but only because they make our lives richer and easier -- and there is nothing new about engineers and entrepreneurs doing that.

President Donald Trump listens during a "Made in America," roundtable event in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, July 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump facing most hostile press coverage in history

Over and over again, I, and many others, have stated that President Donald Trump has received the most hostile press coverage of any sitting president in U.S. history. Democrats laughed and claimed that former President Barack Obama was treated worse, but the facts don't lie.

The Capitol in Washington is quiet after lawmakers departed the for the Independence Day recess, Friday, June 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Republicans, thy name is mud

- The Washington Times

Republicans, as a party, are reeling at their most recent failure -- an epic one -- regarding repeal-replace Obamacare. Stumbling seems to be Republicans' new mode of transportation. What's insanely angering about it is they're stumbling over their own roadblocks.

FILE - In this July 11, 2017, file photo, Donald Trump Jr. is interviewed by host Sean Hannity on his Fox News Channel television program, in New York. Donald Trump Jr. is scheduled to appear July 26 before the Senate Judiciary Committee along with former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, according to a witness list released by the panel. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Was Donald Trump Jr.'s Russian meeting an actual crime?

Last week, The New York Times revealed that in June 2016, Donald Trump Jr., the president's eldest son; Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law and chief confidant; Paul Manafort, Mr. Trump's then-campaign chief executive; and others met secretly at Trump Tower with a former Russian prosecutor and a former Soviet counterintelligence agent to discuss what negative (most likely computer-generated) information the Russians might have to offer them about Hillary Clinton.

Illustration contrasting Trump supporters and opponents by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The great American divide

You could call it the tale of two election reflections, two competing points of view, two American perceptions of out-of-focus reality. Two important liberal voices "looked back" this week at the November election to try to figure out how and why Donald Trump, whom "everybody" despised and "nobody" wanted to win, actually did.

Lawyers' Gift from the CFPB Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A consumer bureau gift to trial lawyers

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the arm of the government supposedly looking out for the interests of consumers, has trampled on consumers to deliver Christmas in July for the trial lawyers.

Illustration on the BNP and terrorism in Bangladesh by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terrorism in Bangladesh under the guise of politics

The western media and several otherwise well-intentioned nongovernmental organizations routinely criticize Bangladesh for taking actions against leaders of the country's main opposition party, the Bangladesh Nationalist Party, or BNP. They assume that accusing opposition party members with crimes is automatically undemocratic and undermines the rule of law.

Illustration on the homicidal spirit behind police killings by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why the war on cops is a war on all of us

As a writer, I've gone out on patrol with police officers, accompanied narcotics squads on drug raids, observed detectives investigating murders and other crimes, and I've interviewed police commanders and commissioners in station houses and police headquarters.

Illustration of Vladimir Putin by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Putin's playthings

About a year ago, Donald Trump Jr. met with a mysterious Russian lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya. Mr. Trump Jr. was purportedly eager to receive information that could damage Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign.

Buying Other People's Contraception Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When insurance becomes a method of taxation

Gail Collins writes in The New York Times that "While Ivanka has been making mewling noises about working moms, the Trump White House has appointed people to major health care policy jobs who don't appear to believe in contraception."

Illustration on government overspending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Porking out with your money

Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to eliminate governmental waste and fraud, just released its "2017 Congressional Pig Book," an annual publication highlighting wasteful government spending that should embarrass each and every member of Congress.

This undated file photo shows writer George Orwell, author of "1984." (AP Photo, File)

Weaponizing language and communication

Fake news has become known for being a false story, gossip or even lies promulgated by the legacy media. We know what our news media establishment often delivers is nothing more than opinion masquerading as news. That in itself is a huge problem. We're all learning about how to recognize it and how seriously to take it, if at all.

Illustration on the efficacy of a border wall in stopping heroin flow to the U.S. by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

To stop the heroin, build the wall

There has been significant focus of late on "America's 50-state epidemic" -- opioid addiction. Many reasons have been advanced for this problem. One is that legally prescribed opioids can lead to heroin abuse. Another is that economic downturns lead to increased drug abuse. As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has stated: "Heroin use has increased across the U.S. among men and women, most age groups, and all income levels."