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Roger Goodell. (Associated Press)

The NFL owners with a playbook of their own

- The Washington Times

The owners of the National Football League finally came up with a playbook of their own. Beset by players who want to be political commentators who work from their knees, and by angry fans who only want to watch a football game without insult to the country they love, the owners consulted their playbook and think they can run out the clock.

Illustration on the clique of dictators by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating the dictators’ clique

A dictators’ clique of China, Russia, Iran and North Korea threatens democracies everywhere. They are more dangerous than any past dictators because they have or are about to have nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them. The best way for peace-loving nations to oppose these dictators is through a global coalition centered on the United States and Europe. The U.S. and European democracies led coalitions that defeated dictators in the World War I, World War II and the Cold War. They can do it again.

Illustration on police and minorities by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Deadly Democratic cities

After a speech in Middletown, Pennsylvania, this week, President Trump sat for an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity. No doubt it was friendly territory. For the president, Mr. Hannity’s questions were underhand softballs tossed down the center of the plate, and the replies were vintage Trump.

Illustration on the strategic importance of an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward an independent Kurdistan

The autonomous Kurdistan region of northern Iraq held a referendum on independence on Sept. 25. It was overwhelmingly approved. This referendum, not surprisingly however, has precipitously raised tensions not only with Iraq but also with Turkey, Syria and Iran, all of which have large — and restive — Kurdish minorities.

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Mystery and a divided world during the Korean War

The Korean conflict came in the wake of the global bloodshed of World War II, and it is commemorated by a surreal platoon in a rice paddy portraying the men who fought in a conflict that has become known as the "forgotten war."

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. "We did not ask for that," he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Strapping Sigmund Freud to his own couch

If there is anything to the theory of reincarnation, Sigmund Freud must have been Moby Dick in a past life and his most recent biographer, Frederick Crews, was probably Captain Ahab.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate's failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men's lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus -- "J' accuse!" -- only because he was a Jew.

Illustration of Fethullah Gulen by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fethullah Gulen, a pious Muslim or a radical Islamist?

Controversial Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is back in the news following a diplomatic standoff between Turkey and the United States. On Oct. 8, the U.S. mission in Turkey announced a decision "to suspend all non-immigrant visa services at all U.S. diplomatic facilities in Turkey," in retaliation for the arrest of a Drug Enforcement Administration liaison in Turkey with suspected ties to Mr. Gulen. Turkey has answered in kind by freezing the issuance of new visas.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that's wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they're concerned, he is "the swamp."

In a Wednesday, Sep. 20, 2017 photo, Carmen De Molina, who became blind five years ago from diabetes, works on walking with her cane through Ridley's while grocery shopping with the Wyoming Independent Living class in Casper, Wyo. The class allows visually impaired individuals and people with other disabilities to practice skills which they can use to be more independent.  (Josh Galemore/The Casper Star-Tribune via AP)

Slavery, a modern-day tragedy

Today it is possible that the clothes and shoes you wear, the mobile phone, computer and laptop you use, the chocolate you eat, the diamonds, gold and jewelry you wear, the coffee and tea you drink, and the food you consume have, at some point, been touched by the hands of slaves.

Illustration on the threat of hurricanes to the electrical grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lights that a hurricane can't blow out

With millions of Americans experiencing power outages due to catastrophic hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, there has never been a more important time to look critically at the reliability and durability of our electrical grid. In Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by Hurricane Maria, reports indicate that it will take months -- or even as long as a year -- for the power to be fully restored.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The problem with Obamacare subsidies

Late last week, President Trump signed an executive order directing the secretaries of the Treasury and health and human services to cease making payments to health care insurance companies in behalf of the more than 6 million Americans who qualify for these payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

Saving the nation from the left's bullies

As we've all been understandably focused on Hollywood's Weinstein dumpster fire, a number of stories have emerged exposing the left's continuing culture war, despite its meltdown in the film industry.

Illustration on the failure to "contain" Russia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How America has failed to contain Russia

Seventy years ago, George Kennan's "Sources of Soviet Conduct" set the course for U.S. containment policy toward the Soviet Union. Following the Soviet Union's collapse and a decade of economic turmoil which resulted in reduced Russian regional as well as global influence, President Vladimir Putin began implementing a national security strategy to resurrect Russia's great power status. He wanted Russia to be perceived as equal in stature to the United States and to ensure western ideals of freedom, liberty, and democracy would not threaten his regime security.

Pope Francis acknowledges the applause of the audience after he delivered his speech during the visit to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on the occasion of the World Food Day, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017.(AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

When interfaith bonding rings false

Pope Francis has become a rock star with refugees -- his hip picture on Caritas.org looks like a still from a Beyonce video. The Catholic Church kicked off its two-year "Share The Journey" campaign on Sept. 27, 2017.