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Sen. Elizabeth Warren. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democrats search for another Lost Cause

- The Washington Times

Union scouts have already discovered Robert E. Lee at the gates of the city, lining up the gallant Pelham’s artillery to fire the opening round, and Stonewall Jackson and Jeb Stuart are expected to arrive on a night train from the Shenandoah Valley.

Illustration on diplomatic options for North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Red-teaming’ the diplomatic option in Korea

Should President Trump meet personally with Kim Jong-un? John Glover, a graduate student at George Mason University wrote an article advocating such a meeting and, frankly, I think that he’s on to something.

Trump's Go-ahead for Infrastructure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Repairing, updating and expanding infrastructure

One of the biggest barriers to investment in infrastructure all across the United States is the long, costly, and unpredictable permitting process. If you have any doubts, just consider the Keystone XL pipeline extension.

Hatred of the Jews returns with a flourish

Anti-Semitism and white supremacy are far from dead in the United States of America. That’s what this past weekend’s violence told the world.

Related Articles

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America's sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear -- again -- that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Illustration on North Korea's backing down by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Armageddon postponed

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un appears to have blinked and President Trump can claim a foreign policy victory and justification for his strategy.

Illustration of Paul Nitze     The Washington Times

The road not taken to nuclear disarmament

Why have so many been so shocked by this latest episode of brinkmanship over the threat of a nuclear war with the unhinged dictatorship in North Korea? It is worth remembering that we have had plenty of warning that such a horrific showdown was headed our way. Indeed, 18 years ago, America's leading authority on nuclear arms strategy explicitly laid out the stark risks that faced us unless we changed our ways.

Jihad Axis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Qatar crisis

Qatar's role in undermining the stability of the Sunni Islamic world is undisputed, and is on a par with that of Iran. Qatar has used the Doha-based Al Jazeera media network to conduct a propaganda war against its Sunni rivals, and also provided massive funding for terrorist militias to undercut its less-jihadist Sunni neighbors.

This June 23, 2015, file photo shows a carving depicting confederates Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis, in Stone Mountain, Ga. Democratic front-runner for governor Stacey Abrams posted several tweets Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, saying the carving at the tourist attraction Stone Mountain Park and other Confederate statues and monuments around the state should be removed. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

Freedom for the speech we hate

Last weekend, serious violence broke out in Charlottesville, Virginia, when a group of white supremacist demonstrators was confronted by a group of folks who were there to condemn the message the demonstrators had come to advance. The message was critical of the government for removing a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee from a public place.

Real progress in regulatory reform

It's true. A full seven months after President Trump's inauguration and the convening of a new Congress, there is a sense of frustration that not enough has been accomplished. Hopefully, when Congress and the president get back to Washington in September, we'll see solid progress on measures to cut taxes and reform the tax code, and to replace Obamacare with a more market-oriented system. Not to mention passage of a budget and action on the debt ceiling.

Illustration on men and women in the workplace and attitudes on gender roles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scapegoats, dupes and gulls

Identity politics has gone over the top, and the flood of intolerance is drenching everyone. What began as a campaign to re-right injustice has created injustice. What was meant to change attitudes toward intolerance has become intolerance enthroned.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

The deadly impact of identity politics

In the aftermath of the horror of the Charlottesville riot, there's been less condemnation by the media and the left of the neo-Nazi that is charged with murdering Heather Heyer and injuring at least 19 others than there has been of President Trump.

Illustration on U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

A new strategy for Afghanistan: change course, quit the fight

It has been reported in recent days that President Trump has angrily rejected the latest recommendation from his national security staff for a new Afghan war strategy. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, in other venues, has claimed the reason for the delay is that forming strategy is "hard work."

Illustration on the need for a U.S. comprehensive peace strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

In search of a grand U.S. strategy

Richard Nixon's rapprochement with China, the end of the Cold War, President Obama's outreach to "the Muslim world," the growth of the (largely American-funded) United Nations -- weren't such developments supposed to lead to a safer world, one in which the "international community" would embrace "universal values" and pursue common interests -- peace and security key among them?